Twin Peaks -- Fire Walk with Me (1992)

R | 134 mins | Drama | 28 August 1992

Director:

David Lynch

Producer:

Gregg Fienberg

Cinematographer:

Ron Garcia

Editor:

Mary Sweeney

Production Designer:

Patricia Norris

Production Company:

Ciby Pictures
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HISTORY

As announced in a 27 May 1991 Var news brief, Aaron Spelling Productions would revive the recently cancelled Twin Peaks television series (ABC, 8 Apr 1990—10 Jun 1991) as a feature film. Spelling previously considered continuing Twin Peaks as a syndicated series for U.S. and international distribution, but the $500,000-per episode cost of production was too high. The feature film project, a prequel titled Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, was set to begin shooting in Aug 1991, with Twin Peaks co-creator David Lynch attached as co-writer and director. However, the 12 Jul 1991 LAT announced the project was cancelled due to lack of interest from actor Kyle MacLachlan, whose character from the television series, “Special Agent Dale Cooper,” figured prominently in the screenplay. In the meantime, a dispute over film rights arose between Spelling Entertainment, Inc. and French producer and distributor CIBY 2000, whose founder, Francois Bouygues, had recently negotiated a $70-million three-picture deal with David Lynch.
       According to an 8 Aug 1991 HR brief, the project was in pre-production after Kyle MacLachlan agreed to five days of filming, a compromise that required his role be significantly reduced. CIBY 2000 was set to finance the estimated $12 million budget. A 16 Aug 1991 Screen International item noted that Spelling Entertainment retained ownership of international distribution rights, with the exception of France, to be handled by CIBY. The 14 Jun 1991 Screen International had previously reported the acquisition of international distribution rights by Twentieth Century Fox, although there was no further mention of that studio in AMPAS library production clippings. ... More Less

As announced in a 27 May 1991 Var news brief, Aaron Spelling Productions would revive the recently cancelled Twin Peaks television series (ABC, 8 Apr 1990—10 Jun 1991) as a feature film. Spelling previously considered continuing Twin Peaks as a syndicated series for U.S. and international distribution, but the $500,000-per episode cost of production was too high. The feature film project, a prequel titled Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, was set to begin shooting in Aug 1991, with Twin Peaks co-creator David Lynch attached as co-writer and director. However, the 12 Jul 1991 LAT announced the project was cancelled due to lack of interest from actor Kyle MacLachlan, whose character from the television series, “Special Agent Dale Cooper,” figured prominently in the screenplay. In the meantime, a dispute over film rights arose between Spelling Entertainment, Inc. and French producer and distributor CIBY 2000, whose founder, Francois Bouygues, had recently negotiated a $70-million three-picture deal with David Lynch.
       According to an 8 Aug 1991 HR brief, the project was in pre-production after Kyle MacLachlan agreed to five days of filming, a compromise that required his role be significantly reduced. CIBY 2000 was set to finance the estimated $12 million budget. A 16 Aug 1991 Screen International item noted that Spelling Entertainment retained ownership of international distribution rights, with the exception of France, to be handled by CIBY. The 14 Jun 1991 Screen International had previously reported the acquisition of international distribution rights by Twentieth Century Fox, although there was no further mention of that studio in AMPAS library production clippings.
       Principal photography began on 5 Sep 1991 in the Cascade Mountains in Washington state, where parts of the television series had been shot shot, as noted in a 5 Sep 1991 HR news item. The first days of filming took place in a recreational vehicle facility in Snoqualmie, WA, which doubled as the Fat Trout Trailer Park.
       During production, a 15 Sep 1991 Long Beach Press-Telegram item reported rumors that actor Kiefer Sutherland was involved in an altercation with another cast member, delaying the filming of Sutherland’s scenes until his facial wounds healed. Sutherland’s publicist and Snoqualmie police denied any knowledge of the incident.
       A 25 Feb 1992 DV item announced New Line Cinema had acquired North American distribution rights for an estimated $6 million. According to a 28 Aug 1992 LAT article, New Line purchased the rights without having seen the film.
On 16 May 1992,        Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me debuted at the Cannes Film Festival. Around the same time, it was theatrically released in Japan, months prior to the 28 Aug 1992 U.S. release. The television series was enjoying a surge of popularity there, as noted in a 2 Aug 1992 NYT article, despite only being aired on Wowow, a pay television satellite channel with only 900,000 subscribers. Japanese Twin Peaks fans were reportedly subscribing to Wowow just to see the series, or joining wait lists to rent or buy the series on home video. Twin Peaks merchandise, including baseball caps, T-shirts, and books, were also popular, and regular group tours to Snoqualmie were being arranged by Japan Travel Bureau. To promote the release of the feature film, titled Twin Peaks: The Last Seven Days of Laura Palmer in Japan, theatrical distributor Nippon Herald Films staged mock funerals for Laura Palmer at which Twin Peaks enthusiasts would pray at “Laura Palmer’s” coffin. As of 2 Aug 1992, Japanese box-office grosses amounted to $2.9 million.
       The U.S. premiere took place in Snoqualmie, at the first-ever Twin Peaks Festival, sponsored by New Line Cinema, on 14-16 Aug 1992. The weekend included Log Lady relays, a murder mystery dinner, and Laura Palmer look-alike and cherry pie-eating contests, according to the 18 May 1992 Var and 3 Aug 1992 HR. The event continued the following year as a fan-organized festival, as stated on the Twin Peaks Festival’s website, and still occurs annually as of the writing of this note (Jan 2016).
       Critical reception of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me was poor. A 28 Aug 1992 LAT article noted the film had been booed at the Cannes Film Festival, and industry insiders were calling it “an unqualified disaster.” New Line chose not to screen it for critics before its U.S. theatrical release. The 18 May 1992 DV and HR Cannes reviews were both negative, with HR describing the prequel as a “wearing experience” and main character “Laura Palmer” as “difficult to care about on any level.” Similarly, the 4 Sep 1992 L.A. Weekly review stated it was hard to know whether Lee’s performance was “terrible or a tour-de-force,” and, “Where the pitch of the TV show was grief laced with black whimsy, here it’s hysteria chafing against delirium.”
       Composer Angelo Baldalamenti received an Independent Spirit Award for Best Original Score, as noted in a 29 Mar 1993 LAT article. Actress Sheryl Lee, who reprised her role from the series as “Laura Palmer,” received an Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Actress.
       According to an 8 Mar 2002 article in Entertainment Today, in early 2000, New Line Home Video entered talks with French distributor MK2, which held certain home video distribution rights, to release over an hour of additional footage as part of a special DVD release of the film. However, talks “broke down,” and New Line claimed a North American DVD release could not be negotiated. David Lynch gave a different explanation, claiming that New Line did not want to pay the estimated $100,000 it would cost for him to oversee editing, mixing, and color correction of the extra footage. In Jul 2014, ninety minutes of excised scenes and outtakes were finally released on Blu-ray disc, as noted in the 17 Jul 2014 Var. A premiere screening, co-hosted by AFI, CBS Home Entertainment, and Paramount Home Media Distribution, took place at the Vista Theater in Los Angeles, CA.
       End credits note: “Accommodations provided by Red Lion Inn/Bellevue Center – Bellevue, Washington”; “Thanks to the Washington State Film & Video Office”; and, “Special Thanks to Pierre Edelman.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
25 Feb 1992.
---
Daily Variety
18 May 1992.
---
Entertainment Today
8 Mar 2002.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Aug 1991
p. 1, 22.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Sep 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 May 1992
p. 5, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 1992.
---
L.A. Weekly
4 Sep 1992.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
15 Sep 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Jul 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Aug 1992.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Aug 1992
Section F, p. 1, 14.
Los Angeles Times
31 Aug 1992
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
29 Mar 1993
Calendar, p. 6.
New York Times
2 Aug 1992.
---
New York Times
29 Aug 1992
p. 11.
Screen International
14 Jun 1991.
---
Screen International
16 Aug 1991.
---
Variety
27 May 1991.
---
Variety
18 May 1992
pp. 43-44.
Variety
18 May 1992.
---
Variety
17 Jul 2014.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring:
as Laura Palmer
[and]
as Leland Palmer
Also starring in alphabetical order:
and
as Special Agent Dale Cooper
Cast in order of appearance:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Francis Bouygues presents
A film by David Lynch
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Steadicam op
Key grip/Dolly grip
Best boy grip
Set grip
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Still photog
Grip & lighting equip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept receptionist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Apprentice ed
Ed intern
Post prod coord
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Const foreman
Lead carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Scenic artist
Painter
Painter
Prop master
COSTUMES
Prod and cost des by
Cost supv
Cost
MUSIC
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Guitar
Synthesizer performance by
Synthesizer performance by
Saxophone
Bass
Bass
Trumpet
Vibraphone
Vibraphone
Drums
Score mixer
The Power & The Glory
The Power & The Glory
The Power & The Glory
The Power & The Glory
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Utility sd
Sd des
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Machine room op
Machine room op
Dial & ADR ed
Foley eng
Foley eng
Prod sd ed
Prod sd ed
Prod sd ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Backwards ADR rec
ADR rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff/L.A.
Spec eff coord
Spec eff/Seattle
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
Spec eff crew
24 frame video displays
Video image crew
Titles and opticals by
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Hairstylist
Make-up asst
Make-up asst
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Supv coord
Seattle coord
Prod asst cam
Scr supv
Loc liaison
Loc asst
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Voice casting
Casting asoc
Extras casting L.A.
Casting asst
Cenex casting
Casting Seattle
Seattle casting
Extras casting Seattle
Unit pub
Prod controller
Prod accountant
Post prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Lynch/Frost chief operating officer
Asst to David Lynch
Asst to Ken Scherer
Asst to Mark Frost
Prod secy
Receptionist
D.G.A. trainee
Asst chef
Medic/Seattle
Medic/L.A.
Animals Seattle
Animals Los Angeles
Craft service/Seattle
Craft service/ L.A.
Security Seattle
Security Los Angeles
Travel arrangements
Completion bond provided by
STAND INS
Stand-in
Stunt coord
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
COLOR PERSONNEL
Film laboratory
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Twin Peaks: The Last Seven Days of Laura Palmer
Release Date:
28 August 1992
Premiere Information:
Cannes Film Festival screening: 16 May 1992
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 August 1992
Production Date:
began 5 September 1991
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Film by Fujicolor
Duration(in mins):
134
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
France, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31718
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Deer Meadow, Washington, the body of a young woman named Teresa Banks is found floating in Wind River. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agent Gordon Cole assigns special agent Chester “Chet” Desmond and another agent, Sam Stanley, to investigate. Gordon Cole presents Chester with a red-headed woman named “Lil,” who performs a dance, wearing a sour face and blinking both eyes to indicate they will have trouble with local authorities, who are hiding a secret. By walking in place, Lil warns that the investigation will require a lot of “legwork,” and her tailored dress, according to Chester, suggests that drugs are involved. At Deer Meadow police headquarters, Chester pushes past a sneering Deputy Cliff to confront Sheriff Cable, who expresses disdain for the FBI, but relinquishes a box of evidence. In the morgue behind the police station, Sam Stanley examines Teresa Banks’s body, and determines the young woman was killed by a blow to the back of the head. A mark on her left ring finger indicates she wore a ring, but it is missing. The men go to Hap’s diner, where Teresa worked nights. A middle-aged waitress named Irene suspects that Teresa, who was a drifter, had a cocaine habit. Chester and Sam visit the Fat Trout trailer park where Teresa Banks lived. Inside her trailer, they find a photograph of Teresa wearing a gold ring with a green stone. Sam goes to Portland, Oregon, to perform a more thorough examination of the body. When Chester returns to the trailer park, he finds Teresa’s green ring under Deputy Cliff’s trailer. Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, FBI special agent Dale Cooper informs Gordon Cole that it is February sixteenth, ... +


In Deer Meadow, Washington, the body of a young woman named Teresa Banks is found floating in Wind River. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agent Gordon Cole assigns special agent Chester “Chet” Desmond and another agent, Sam Stanley, to investigate. Gordon Cole presents Chester with a red-headed woman named “Lil,” who performs a dance, wearing a sour face and blinking both eyes to indicate they will have trouble with local authorities, who are hiding a secret. By walking in place, Lil warns that the investigation will require a lot of “legwork,” and her tailored dress, according to Chester, suggests that drugs are involved. At Deer Meadow police headquarters, Chester pushes past a sneering Deputy Cliff to confront Sheriff Cable, who expresses disdain for the FBI, but relinquishes a box of evidence. In the morgue behind the police station, Sam Stanley examines Teresa Banks’s body, and determines the young woman was killed by a blow to the back of the head. A mark on her left ring finger indicates she wore a ring, but it is missing. The men go to Hap’s diner, where Teresa worked nights. A middle-aged waitress named Irene suspects that Teresa, who was a drifter, had a cocaine habit. Chester and Sam visit the Fat Trout trailer park where Teresa Banks lived. Inside her trailer, they find a photograph of Teresa wearing a gold ring with a green stone. Sam goes to Portland, Oregon, to perform a more thorough examination of the body. When Chester returns to the trailer park, he finds Teresa’s green ring under Deputy Cliff’s trailer. Meanwhile, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, FBI special agent Dale Cooper informs Gordon Cole that it is February sixteenth, a day he has dreamt about. The long-lost FBI agent Phillip Jeffries stumbles into Gordon’s office, and babbles incoherently about a meeting he witnessed above a convenience store. Jeffries experiences flashbacks of a little person, known as the “Man from Another Place,” uttering the word “garmonbozia,” and talking about a green formica table, in a room with a young boy in a white mask, and a menacing man with long, gray hair. Jeffries declares, “We live inside a dream,” then disappears. Although guards in the lobby claim Jeffries never entered the building, Dale Cooper reviews security camera footage, insisting he was. Gordon Cole’s aide, Albert Rosenfeld, gets word that Chester Desmond has gone missing. Dale Cooper goes to the Fat Trout trailer park where he was last seen, and notices an empty lot. The landlord, Carl Rodd, explains that an older woman, Mrs. Chalfont, used to live there with her grandson. Dale Cooper speaks into a Dictaphone, informing his assistant, Diane, that he has a bad feeling about the Teresa Banks investigation. One year later, in Twin Peaks, Washington, beautiful high school student Laura Palmer cheats on her boyfriend, Bobby Briggs, with James Hurley in the janitor’s closet. After school, she is dismissive of Bobby, an obnoxious jock, and goes to the home of her best friend, Donna Hayward, who asks if she is going to see James or Bobby that night. Laura refuses to tell, claiming, “Night time is my time.” Donna wonders aloud if they were falling in space, would they slow down or go faster? Laura believes they would fall faster, and eventually burst into flames, and there would be no angels there to help. At home, drinking liquor and smoking a cigarette, Laura discovers several pages have been torn from her diary. She goes to see a man named Harold Smith, who encouraged her to write a diary. Laura suspects “Bob” stole the pages, but Harold argues that Bob is not real. Laura disagrees, insisting that Bob has been “having her” since she was twelve years old. Suddenly, Laura grips Harold’s shoulders, her face contorts into something monstrous, and she says, “Fire walk with me.” Returning to her normal self, Laura cries and begs Harold to hide her diary. Meanwhile, Dale Cooper predicts that Teresa Banks’s killer will strike again, and the victim will be a blonde, sexually promiscuous high school student who uses drugs, and is currently preparing “an abundance of food.” At the same time, Laura picks up “Meals on Wheels” for homebound Twin Peaks residents. Outside her car, she sees an older woman, Mrs. Chalfont, and her grandson, who wears the same white mask as the boy in deranged FBI agent Phillip Jeffries’ recollections. Mrs. Chalfont gives Laura a framed picture of an open door. Mrs. Chalfont’s grandson points out that “the man behind the mask is looking for the book with the pages torn out.” Laura rushes home and finds Bob, with the long gray hair Jeffries remembered, hiding in a bedroom. Fleeing in fear, she spies her father, Leland Palmer, and frets that Leland and Bob might be the same person. At dinner that night, Leland inspects Laura’s hands and declares them filthy. Laura’s chain-smoking mother, Sarah, weakly protests as Leland berates his daughter and suggests one of her “lovers” gave her the gold necklace she is wearing. Later that night, Leland comes into Laura’s bedroom, kisses her forehead, and tells her he loves her. Laura hangs the framed picture from Mrs. Chalfont. She dreams of being led through the doorway in the picture. In a room enclosed by a red curtain, Dale Cooper speaks to the Man from Another Place, who says, “I am the arm,” and presents Teresa Banks’s green ring. Dale warns Laura not to take the ring. She wakes up to find a dead girl named Annie Blackburn in her bed. According to Annie, the “good Dale” is stuck in “the lodge” and cannot leave. Laura gasps when she discovers the green ring in her hand. In the morning, however, she wakes up to find it gone. Laura’s boyfriend, Bobby, arranges with Jacques Renault, a French-Canadian nightclub proprietor, to buy $10,000 worth of cocaine. Curious to know what her friend does at night, Donna follows Laura to Jacques’s nightclub, the Bang Bang Bar. On her way in, Laura encounters a woman carrying a log, who warns, “When this kind of fire starts, it’s very hard to put out” and “all goodness is in jeopardy.” Inside, Donna realizes Laura has been moonlighting as a prostitute. Although Laura is reluctant to include her, Donna insists on joining her with her two clients. They go to an after-hours club, where Laura dances topless with Ronette Pulaski, another teenage prostitute. Meanwhile, Donna kisses one of the men and allows him to remove her top. Laura drags her out of the club. In the morning, Laura urges Donna not to become like her. Leland Palmer arrives at Donna’s house to pick Laura up. Seeing her and Donna together, he has a flashback of Laura and Ronette Pulaski in a motel room. He takes Laura to meet her mother for breakfast. While stuck in a traffic jam, Leland is accosted by one-armed man Philip Gerard, who rides in a truck. Unable to move, Leland revs his engine to drown out Gerard’s rant about a stolen can of corn and a formica table. He warns Leland, “The thread will be torn,” then shows Laura the green ring and shouts, “It’s him. It’s your father.” Laura covers her ears and screams. Taking refuge at a gas station, Leland asks, “Who am I?” and Laura cannot answer. Leland recalls sleeping with Teresa Banks, and asking her to arrange an orgy with her “friends.” However, when he showed up for the orgy, Leland spied Laura and Ronette waiting for him, and he fled. He remembers bludgeoning Teresa Banks and dumping her body in the river. Increasingly dependent on cocaine, Laura accompanies Bobby to meet a drug dealer, who turns out to be police deputy Cliff. As Cliff presents the bag of cocaine, he draws his gun, but Bobby pulls his own gun and shoots the deputy dead. Laura laughs maniacally as Bobby panics. Later that night, she snorts cocaine in her bedroom, while Leland forces Sarah Palmer to drink a glass of milk. Sarah passes out and dreams of a white horse standing in the living room. Laura becomes aroused when Bob creeps in through her bedroom window. As they have sex, however, Bob’s face transforms into Leland’s, and Laura screams. The next day, Laura goes to school in a daze. She meets James for a brief rendezvous that night, then goes to Jacques’s cabin for a cocaine-fueled orgy. Leland interrupts, attacking Jacques and dragging Laura and Ronette outside. He takes the girls to an abandoned train car, where Laura cowers in fear as Leland’s face transforms into Bob’s. Leland/Bob gives her a mirror, and Laura sees her own face transform into Bob’s. Philip Gerard, the one-armed man, arrives. As Ronette opens the door for him, Leland pushes her out. Gerard tosses the green ring at Laura, and she puts it on just before Leland/Bob stabs her to death. Afterward, he dumps her body in a lake. At the “lodge” where Annie Blackburn claimed Dale Cooper was trapped, Philip Gerard and the Man from Another Place watch as Leland’s body levitates, and Bob appears. Simultaneously, Gerard and the Man from Another Place say, “I want all my garmonbozia,” a word for pain and sorrow. Bob reaches into Leland’s wound and heals him. As Leland’s blood vanishes, someone eats a spoonful of canned corn, and a beast intones the name “Judy.” Now dead, Laura sits in the lodge. Dale Cooper places his hand on her shoulder. She sees an angel in the shadows, and laughs through her tears. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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