Unlawful Entry (1992)

R | 111 mins | Drama | 26 June 1992

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HISTORY

The 26 Apr 1991 DV announced that Largo Entertainment’s next production would be Unlawful Entry, a psychological thriller that would begin principal photography late summer 1991 in Los Angeles, CA.
       Articles in the 7 Jun 1992 LAT and the 22 Jun 1992 HR reported that the film features a scene in which actor Ray Liotta’s character, police officer Pete Davis, viciously beats an African American suspect. The scene was written prior to the Rodney King beating by Los Angeles, CA, police officers on 3 Mar 1991. Although filming took place after that incident, director Jonathan Kaplan stated that he tried “to ignore it because the movie’s not really about that.” However, the officers’ acquittal on 29 Apr 1992 and the subsequent Los Angeles, CA, riot changed the “atmosphere” regarding urban violence in films. The scene was considered essential to the plot and could not be eliminated, but Kaplan and producer Charles Gordon edited out most of the “lengthy” beating.
       An item in the 7 May 1992 HR announced that Largo Entertainment moved the film’s release date from Fall 1992 to 26 Jun 1992 to open on 1,200 to 1,500 screens.
       End credits include the following statement: “Clip from ‘Later With Bob Costas’ courtesy of the National Broadcasting Company, ... More Less

The 26 Apr 1991 DV announced that Largo Entertainment’s next production would be Unlawful Entry, a psychological thriller that would begin principal photography late summer 1991 in Los Angeles, CA.
       Articles in the 7 Jun 1992 LAT and the 22 Jun 1992 HR reported that the film features a scene in which actor Ray Liotta’s character, police officer Pete Davis, viciously beats an African American suspect. The scene was written prior to the Rodney King beating by Los Angeles, CA, police officers on 3 Mar 1991. Although filming took place after that incident, director Jonathan Kaplan stated that he tried “to ignore it because the movie’s not really about that.” However, the officers’ acquittal on 29 Apr 1992 and the subsequent Los Angeles, CA, riot changed the “atmosphere” regarding urban violence in films. The scene was considered essential to the plot and could not be eliminated, but Kaplan and producer Charles Gordon edited out most of the “lengthy” beating.
       An item in the 7 May 1992 HR announced that Largo Entertainment moved the film’s release date from Fall 1992 to 26 Jun 1992 to open on 1,200 to 1,500 screens.
       End credits include the following statement: “Clip from ‘Later With Bob Costas’ courtesy of the National Broadcasting Company, Inc.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
26 Apr 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 1992
p. 8, 24, 30.
Los Angeles Times
7 Jun 1992
p. 21, 23.
Los Angeles Times
26 Jun 1992
p. 1.
New York Times
26 Jun 1992
p. 10.
Variety
22 Jun 1992
p. 43.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Largo Entertainment Presents
In Association With JVC Entertainment
A Charles Gordon Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Line prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Aerial D.P.
Arriflex® cam and lenses provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Set des
Prop master
Asst props
Asst props
Const coord
General foreman
Loc foreman
Stage foreman
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Labor foreman
Const office coord
Stand-by painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
Set costumer
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Boom person
Cable person
Sd des & supv
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Post prod sd services and re-rec facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Visual consultant
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc liaison
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst to Mr. Gordon
Asst to Mr. Levy
Asst to Mr. Kaplan
Asst to Mr. Liotta
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Caterer
Caterer
Cook driver
Craft service
Animal trainer
Asst animal trainer
Police coord
Tech adv
Tech adv
Tech adv
Helicopter pilot/Gyrosphere
Set security
Set security
1st aid
Post prod asst
Post prod asst
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Negative and print film
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
“Pa La Ocha Tambo,” written and performed by Eddie Palmieri, courtesy of Sonido, Inc.
“National Crime Awareness Week,” (Alfred Hitchcock Presents Mix), written by Ron Mael and Russell Mael, performed by Sparks, courtesy of Virgin Music America
“Everybody’s Free To Feel Good,” written by Nigel Swanson and Tim Cox, performed by Rozalla, courtesy of Pulse-8 Records Ltd.
+
SONGS
“Pa La Ocha Tambo,” written and performed by Eddie Palmieri, courtesy of Sonido, Inc.
“National Crime Awareness Week,” (Alfred Hitchcock Presents Mix), written by Ron Mael and Russell Mael, performed by Sparks, courtesy of Virgin Music America
“Everybody’s Free To Feel Good,” written by Nigel Swanson and Tim Cox, performed by Rozalla, courtesy of Pulse-8 Records Ltd.
“Don’t Go To Strangers,” written and performed by J.J. Cale, courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets, a division of PolyGram Group Distribution, Inc.
“Just A Little Dream,” written and performed by Eddie Palmieri, courtesy of Intuition Records, Inc.
+
PERFORMERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
26 June 1992
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 26 June 1992
Production Date:
began late summer 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Largo Entertainment
Copyright Date:
24 June 1992
Copyright Number:
PA577065
Physical Properties:
Sound
Lucasfilm Ltd. THX Sound System
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo SR™ in selectred theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
111
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31866
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

A burglar breaks into the new home of nightclub entrepreneur Michael Carr and his wife, Karen, who works as a teacher. The burglar holds Karen at knifepoint before escaping. When Officers Pete Davis and Roy Cole respond to the call, Michael mentions he plans on getting a gun, but Karen objects. The officers agree with her, and Pete Davis offers to help the couple get a new security system. He stops by when he is off-duty to supervise the installation, and enters their code, “Pyramid,” into the system. Michael and Karen are appreciative of his support and invite him to stay for dinner. Michael Carr confides that he felt helpless when Karen was held hostage, and wishes he had a chance to beat up the intruder. Pete laughs and offers to take Michael on a ride-along the following evening. After the ride-along shift ends, Pete drops off his partner, Roy Cole, and drives Michael to a remote, decrepit building. Revealing he has tracked the burglar to this address, Pete drags the suspect outside and offers Michael the chance to beat him up. Shocked, Michael refuses, and watches in horror as Pete severely beats the man. At home, Michael informs Karen about the evening’s events and declares he does not want to see Pete again. Karen thinks her husband is overreacting, and is relieved the burglar has been arrested. The next day, Pete Davis unexpectedly visits Karen to relate his version of the evening’s events. He insists the suspect resisted arrest, and declares he will do whatever it takes to protect himself and those with him. ... +


A burglar breaks into the new home of nightclub entrepreneur Michael Carr and his wife, Karen, who works as a teacher. The burglar holds Karen at knifepoint before escaping. When Officers Pete Davis and Roy Cole respond to the call, Michael mentions he plans on getting a gun, but Karen objects. The officers agree with her, and Pete Davis offers to help the couple get a new security system. He stops by when he is off-duty to supervise the installation, and enters their code, “Pyramid,” into the system. Michael and Karen are appreciative of his support and invite him to stay for dinner. Michael Carr confides that he felt helpless when Karen was held hostage, and wishes he had a chance to beat up the intruder. Pete laughs and offers to take Michael on a ride-along the following evening. After the ride-along shift ends, Pete drops off his partner, Roy Cole, and drives Michael to a remote, decrepit building. Revealing he has tracked the burglar to this address, Pete drags the suspect outside and offers Michael the chance to beat him up. Shocked, Michael refuses, and watches in horror as Pete severely beats the man. At home, Michael informs Karen about the evening’s events and declares he does not want to see Pete again. Karen thinks her husband is overreacting, and is relieved the burglar has been arrested. The next day, Pete Davis unexpectedly visits Karen to relate his version of the evening’s events. He insists the suspect resisted arrest, and declares he will do whatever it takes to protect himself and those with him. Later, Michael Carr and his lawyer, Roger Graham, host a private event for potential nightclub investors. While Michael and Roger talk with interested businessmen, Karen chats with her co-worker, Penny. Pete Davis arrives, and Penny flirts with him, suggesting he visit their elementary school to speak with students. Pete interrupts Michael’s conversation, and charms the investors with a few security ideas. Michael pulls him aside and orders Pete to leave. Pete angrily watches from outside as Michael kisses his wife and toasts the club’s success. Pete impresses Penny and Karen when he visits their classroom and interacts with the students. Afterward, he invites Karen for a cup of coffee and learns about her background. Pete declares he will always be a true friend. Secretly, Pete mounts a campaign against Michael, cancelling credit cards and having his car “booted” for supposedly unpaid parking tickets. At their home, Michael and Karen Carr are making love when the security alarm goes off. He grabs his new gun, locks her in the bathroom for safety, and searches the house. The alarm company calls for their code as Michael discovers their cat, Tiny, probably tripped the alarm. Karen is angry that he purchased a gun without consulting her. He apologizes, but admits he felt powerless when she was attacked, and does not want it to happen again. They resume making love, but are interrupted by Pete’s arrival in their bedroom. Michael believes Pete is behind his recent troubles and may have tripped the alarm. However, Pete claims he was merely responding to the alarm call. Michael calls his lawyer, Roger Graham, and asks how to stop a “psycho” police officer. He meets with police Captain Russell Hayes, who questions Michael’s complaint against the highly-decorated officer. Hayes promises to investigate, but notes that Michael Carr has no proof against Pete Davis. Later, Roger Graham informs Michael that Pete is questioning their investors, making it seem as if Michael is under investigation. Roger avises Michael to pay Pete off. Michael offers Pete a $5,000 bribe, but he refuses. He reveals details from his conversation with Karen and threatens to shoot Michael, but leaves instead. Michael questions Karen about her relationship with Pete, and she insists they merely had a friendly conversation after his classroom visit. Michael turns to Pete’s partner, Roy Cole, for help, and reveals that Pete threatened to shoot him. Roy confronts Pete, who insists he is the best man for Karen. Roy declares the romance is a fantasy, and gives his partner twenty-four hours to go on stress leave and seek help, or Roy will inform their superiors. As they patrol that evening, Pete instigates a chase after a drug dealer named Leon. They follow Leon to his apartment, where Pete shoots Roy, plants the murder weapon in Leon’s hand, and then kills the drug dealer with Roy’s gun. In the aftermath, Pete claims to have been searching outside, while Roy entered the apartment and was killed. Meanwhile, police receive a tip that Michael Carr is a drug dealer. They search the Carr home, find drugs in Michael’s office, and arrest him. Michael’s assets are tied up in the nightclub, and he cannot afford the $250,000 bail. Pete visits Michael in jail and promises to take good care of Karen. At the house, fellow teacher, Penny, is staying with Karen until Michaels return. While Karen takes a nap, Penny is surprised when Pete knocks on the French doors to the backyard, carrying groceries. She will not let him in, and he leaves the groceries by the door. Thinking Pete is gone, Penny disarms the alarm system and opens the door. As she reaches for the groceries, Pete grabs her arm. Meanwhile, Michael is allowed access to a telephone. He calls Karen and learns their telephone is off the hook. Roger Graham puts up his home as collateral for Michael’s bail, and rushes to the police station to free Michael, who insists on driving home. He speeds through a red light and is pursued by a motorcycle cop. He races around a corner, jumps out, and runs away while Roger waylays the officer. At the Carr home, Karen comes downstairs and is shocked to find Pete cooking dinner. He claims he sent Penny home, and declares they can now admit their love for each other. She convinces him to put his gun in a drawer, and as he continues to cook, she goes to bring her cat, Tiny, inside. As she moves to the front door, she notices Tiny hiding in a closet and discovers Penny’s dead body. Karen hides her shock as Pete joins her. He wants to make love, but she insists on changing into something more attractive. She searches for Michael’s gun, but Pete enters the room holding it. Karen kisses him, gets the weapon, and aims it at him. She shoots, but Pete has emptied the gun. He is furious that she would try to kill him, and calls her a “whore.” As he attempts to rape her, his car alarm blares outside. He handcuffs Karen in the bathroom, and rushes outside to silence the alarm. Michael runs inside to rescue Karen. When they sneak downstairs, Pete breaks through the glass doors and the security alarm goes off. As the two men fight, Karen hides in the upstairs bathroom. Pete knocks Michael down as the alarm company calls. He pretends to be Michael and uses the code “Pyramid.” However, Michael has changed the code. Pete puts a gun to his head, drags Michael upstairs, and threatens to kill him unless Karen leaves with Pete. She grabs a glass object, opens the door, and smashes Pete on the head. The gun flies free and Michael hits Pete, knocking him downstairs. Michael picks up the gun and goes downstairs with Karen. Pete appears lifeless, but as they move toward the door, the officer stands. Michael empties the gun into Pete, killing him. The couple sits on the front steps to wait for police. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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