Where the Day Takes You (1992)

R | 105 mins | Drama | 11 September 1992

Director:

Marc Rocco

Producer:

Paul Hertzberg

Cinematographer:

King Baggot

Production Designer:

Kirk Petruccelli

Production Company:

Night and Day Productions
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HISTORY

       The 23 Jul 1992 NYT reported that writer Michael Hitchcock was inspired to write the screenplay after volunteering at runaway youth shelters in the Hollywood, CA, area. Director Marc Rocco, the stepson of actor Alex Rocco, grew up in Hollywood and was familiar with the many homeless youth who congregated along Hollywood Boulevard. Rocco indicated most of the runaways were trying to escape some type of abuse, either sexual, physical, or emotional, and were chasing the dream of wealth and fame that Hollywood offered.
       In Feb 1991, Cinetel Films announced an agreement to produce Where The Day Takes You as the first picture in its development deal with Marc Rocco’s Yankee Entertainment Group, as reported in the 28 Feb 1991 DV. Writer Kurt Voss was busy rewriting Hitchcock’s original script, and later Rocco would also contribute to revisions.
       The film attracted rising acting talent including young actors Dermot Mulroney, Lara Flynn Boyle, Sean Astin, and Balthazar Getty in the four main roles, as well as Kyle MacLachlan, Ricki Lake, James Le Gros, Alyssa Milano, Nancy McKeon, and Laura San Giacomo in supporting roles. Will Smith had his first big-screen role portraying a crippled homeless man in a wheelchair, while David Arquette also made his big-screen debut, appearing as a young gay hustler in two scenes. Actor Christian Slater played a social worker in an unbilled cameo.
       Several other actors were announced as having signed, but did not stay with the project. The 28 Feb 1991 DV reported that Eric Stoltz would star with Drew Barrymore and Casey Siemaszko. The 17 May 1991 HR indicated ... More Less

       The 23 Jul 1992 NYT reported that writer Michael Hitchcock was inspired to write the screenplay after volunteering at runaway youth shelters in the Hollywood, CA, area. Director Marc Rocco, the stepson of actor Alex Rocco, grew up in Hollywood and was familiar with the many homeless youth who congregated along Hollywood Boulevard. Rocco indicated most of the runaways were trying to escape some type of abuse, either sexual, physical, or emotional, and were chasing the dream of wealth and fame that Hollywood offered.
       In Feb 1991, Cinetel Films announced an agreement to produce Where The Day Takes You as the first picture in its development deal with Marc Rocco’s Yankee Entertainment Group, as reported in the 28 Feb 1991 DV. Writer Kurt Voss was busy rewriting Hitchcock’s original script, and later Rocco would also contribute to revisions.
       The film attracted rising acting talent including young actors Dermot Mulroney, Lara Flynn Boyle, Sean Astin, and Balthazar Getty in the four main roles, as well as Kyle MacLachlan, Ricki Lake, James Le Gros, Alyssa Milano, Nancy McKeon, and Laura San Giacomo in supporting roles. Will Smith had his first big-screen role portraying a crippled homeless man in a wheelchair, while David Arquette also made his big-screen debut, appearing as a young gay hustler in two scenes. Actor Christian Slater played a social worker in an unbilled cameo.
       Several other actors were announced as having signed, but did not stay with the project. The 28 Feb 1991 DV reported that Eric Stoltz would star with Drew Barrymore and Casey Siemaszko. The 17 May 1991 HR indicated that actor Jonathan Silverman was part of the cast, while the 23 May 1991 DV said actress Ione Skye would also appear. While there was no direct explanation for why so many actors left the project before filming began, the 23 Jul 1992 NYT reported that many of the actors’ agents recommended they not do the film since the subject matter was controversial and the pay was very low. The actors who did appear in the film spent considerable time researching their roles on Hollywood Boulevard with real runaways.
       Principal photography began on 10 Jun 1991, according to the 23 Jul 1991 HR production chart. The film shot primarily in the Hollywood area, largely along Hollywood Boulevard, in addition to scenes shot at the Santa Monica Pier. The film had a budget of $2.8 million, the 30 Sep 1992 DV reported.
       Where The Day Takes You had its world premiere on 11 Jan 1992 at the Palm Springs International Film Festival, according to the 16 Jan 1992 DV review. It played at many film festivals before opening on ninety-three screens on 11 Sep 1992.
       End credits also state: “For his continued support, the filmmakers would like to express their heartfelt gratitude to Larry Estes. Special Thanks to: Chris Black; Bill Leopold; Judy Hofflund; Dani Sexton; Josh Lieberman, C.A.A.; Lisa Rocco; Kevin McCormick; Richard Rush; Bill Rojas; Donnie Roach; City of Hollywood; Teen Canteen; Covenant House California; Children of the Night; Meg Thomas; Baby Doc; Lynn Leslie; Lon Usher; L.A.P.D.; The Rocco Family; Larry Kasanoff; Ellen Steloff; Guy Riedel; Eric Woster; Mark Scroggs; Ralph and Ida Walters; Catherine Keener; Tim Moore.”
      End credits begin with the following statement: “Every 26 seconds a child runs away from home. Covenant House Hotline for Runaway/Homeless Youth 1-800-999-9999.” Additionally, end credits state: “Originally developed by Magnus Films"; “Filmed on location in Hollywood, California"; and a disambiguation of Matthew 19:14: “Suffer the little children to come unto me.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1991
p. 1, 24.
Daily Variety
23 May 1991.
---
Daily Variety
16 Jan 1992
p. 2, 19.
Daily Variety
30 Sep 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jul 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1992
p. 8, 160.
Los Angeles Times
11 Sep 1992
p. 13.
New York Times
23 Jul 1992
Section C, p. 17, 20.
New York Times
11 Sep 1992
p. 14.
Variety
20 Jan 1992
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Cinetel Films, Inc. Presents
A Paul Hertzberg Production
A Film by Marc Rocco
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Line prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-exec prod
WRITERS
Wrt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
2d unit dir of photog/Helicopter photog
Grip/Elec equip
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Graffiti artist
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed, Post Prod
2d asst ed, Post Prod
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
On set dresser
Lead scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Const coord
Const foreman
Set const
Const crew
Const crew
Const crew
COSTUMES
Ward asst
MUSIC
Orig score
Orig score performed by
Orig score performed by
Mus ed, Post Prod
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd mixer
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd ed, Post Prod
Supv sd ed, Post Prod
Sd ed, Post Prod
Sd ed, Post Prod
Sd ed, Post Prod
Sd ed, Post Prod
Asst sd ed, Post Prod
Asst sd ed, Post Prod
Apprentice sd ed, Post Prod
Foley artist, Post Prod
Foley artist, Post Prod
Re-rec mixer, Post Prod
Re-rec mixer, Post Prod
Rec, Post Prod
Rec, Post Prod
ADR/Foley mixer, Post Prod
Rec, Post Prod
Optical sd transfer
Dolby Stereo consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Titles & opticals
Spec eff equip
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Asst makeup
Key hairstylist
Tattoo des
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting dir
Exec in charge of prod
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Prod van driver
Driver
Driver
Honeywagon driver
Honeywagon driver
Honeywagon driver
Asst to Mr. Rocco
Asst to Mr. Hertzberg
Key prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Craft services
Caterer
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Insert car driver
Set security
Police tech adv
Helicopter pilot
Post prod coord, Post Prod
Legal services
Legal clearances
Post prod accounting
Post prod accounting
Post prod accounting
Completion guarantor
Completion guarantor
Insurance
Insurance
Prod finances
Prod finances
Pub for Marc Rocco and Phil McKeon
Payroll services
Tech adv
STAND INS
Stand-in
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Hazeltine timer
Telecine colorist
SOURCES
SONGS
“For What It’s Worth,” written by Stephen Stills, published by Cotillion Music, Inc., Ten East Music, Springalo Toones & Richie Furay Music, all rights administered by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp. (BMI), performed by Buffalo Springfield, courtesy of Atco/East-West Records America, by arrangement with Warner Special Products, new version performed by Mickey Thomas, produced by Mark Morgan and Marc Rocco
“No Surfing In Hell,” written by The Disciples, courtesy of Jason Sacks
“Precious Pain,” written and performed by Melissa Etheridge
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SONGS
“For What It’s Worth,” written by Stephen Stills, published by Cotillion Music, Inc., Ten East Music, Springalo Toones & Richie Furay Music, all rights administered by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp. (BMI), performed by Buffalo Springfield, courtesy of Atco/East-West Records America, by arrangement with Warner Special Products, new version performed by Mickey Thomas, produced by Mark Morgan and Marc Rocco
“No Surfing In Hell,” written by The Disciples, courtesy of Jason Sacks
“Precious Pain,” written and performed by Melissa Etheridge
“Occasionally,” written and performed by Melissa Etheridge, from the Island Records album “Melissa Etheridge” ℗
1988, produced by Craig Krampf, Kevin McCormick, Melissa Etheridge and Niko Bolas, published by MLE Music/Almo Music Corp. (ASCAP)
“Royal Station 4/16,” written and performed by Melissa Etheridge
“You Can Sleep While I Drive,” written and performed by Melissa Etheridge
“Testify,” written by Melissa Etheridge and Kevin McCormick, performed by Melissa Etheridge, from the Island Records album “Brave and Crazy” ℗
1989, produced by Kevin McCormick, Niko Bolas, Melissa Etheridge, published by MLE Music/Almo Music Corp. (ASCAP), used by permission of EMI Blackwood Music/This Way Out Music, Melissa Etheridge songs courtesy of Island Records.
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DETAILS
Release Date:
11 September 1992
Premiere Information:
World Premiere at Palm Springs International Film Festival: 11 January 1992
New York and Los Angeles openings: 11 September 1992
Production Date:
began 10 June 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Cinetel Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 April 1993
Copyright Number:
PA607432
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31462
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Los Angeles, California, a twenty-one-year-old man named “King” heads a loose-knit, unofficial “family” of runaway teens living on the streets of Hollywood. King has been homeless for the past seven years and is an older brother figure to the teens, giving them advice and protecting them. The “family” often sleeps under a bridge beside the Hollywood Freeway, an area they call “the Hole.” Other times the teens have enough money to get a motel room with four or five others. The teens beg for food money on the streets and engage in petty robbery. Sometimes they trade sex for drugs or a place to sleep for the night. For fun, King and the teens sometimes go a footbridge near the rail yard and jump onto the top of a train as it passes under. King advises the teens to avoid police, who will often pick them up for loitering in order to find out who they are and check their names against missing person reports. King does not want any of his “friends” to be sent back home, although he also admits he cannot trust them. King spent three months in jail for assaulting a man with a bottle. Although his bail was $500, none of the teens could raise that much money. Now that he is out on parole, King receives $10 a session for allowing a social worker to interview him for a report on homeless runaways. While in jail, King left an older teen named “Crasher” in charge, but Crasher could not keep the teens in line because they do not respect him as they do King. King becomes upset when he cannot find his ... +


In Los Angeles, California, a twenty-one-year-old man named “King” heads a loose-knit, unofficial “family” of runaway teens living on the streets of Hollywood. King has been homeless for the past seven years and is an older brother figure to the teens, giving them advice and protecting them. The “family” often sleeps under a bridge beside the Hollywood Freeway, an area they call “the Hole.” Other times the teens have enough money to get a motel room with four or five others. The teens beg for food money on the streets and engage in petty robbery. Sometimes they trade sex for drugs or a place to sleep for the night. For fun, King and the teens sometimes go a footbridge near the rail yard and jump onto the top of a train as it passes under. King advises the teens to avoid police, who will often pick them up for loitering in order to find out who they are and check their names against missing person reports. King does not want any of his “friends” to be sent back home, although he also admits he cannot trust them. King spent three months in jail for assaulting a man with a bottle. Although his bail was $500, none of the teens could raise that much money. Now that he is out on parole, King receives $10 a session for allowing a social worker to interview him for a report on homeless runaways. While in jail, King left an older teen named “Crasher” in charge, but Crasher could not keep the teens in line because they do not respect him as they do King. King becomes upset when he cannot find his girl friend, Devon, but takes a shine to a new girl, seventeen-year-old Heather from Chicago, Illinois. The other teens tell Heather the reason King likes her is that she looks like Devon. They also try to warn her off King by lying that he stabbed Devon in the stomach and killed her. One night, two of the teens, Greg Burtis from Los Angeles, who is addicted to amphetamines, and “Little J” from Boston, Massachusetts, who has a dangerous violent streak, break into a fancy car and steal the stereo. Little J also finds a gun in the car and pockets it. However, when they try to break into another car, its alarm sounds. The two run away, dropping the stolen car stereo in the process. Seventeen-year-old Greg Burtis goes to his drug dealer, Ted, looking for amphetamines. However, when Greg does not have any money, Ted sends him away. Greg goes back to his middle-class parents’ home, raiding his bedroom looking for money. However, Greg’s father has him arrested for stealing his stepmother’s jewelry. Rather than sending Greg to jail, a social worker arranges to place him in a drug rehabilitation house with other teens. Little J wants money to buy bullets for the pistol he stole from the car. A gay hustler arranges an encounter for him with a middle-aged gay man named Charles. Little J admits he first had sex with another man, his uncle, at age eleven, and a girl at age twelve. After the encounter with Charles, Little J buys bullets and practices shooting at glass bottles, all the while screaming about the “faggot” he just had sex with. One night, Tommy Ray White comes to the Hole looking for King. Tommy Ray begins kicking King and pulls a knife on him. Little J shoots Tommy Ray in the back, killing him. The other teens scatter to get away from the crime scene. Heather takes the badly beaten King to nearby Santa Monica where she begs for money on the pier, making $30, enough for them to get a motel room for the night. The two make love multiple times and in chatting after sex, Heather admits she ran away from home because her brother was molesting her. The next day, King suggests they return to the pier to beg for money so they can stay in the motel again. However, Heather says she actually did not get any money from panhandling on the pier. She paid for the motel room with money she brought with her from Chicago. Meanwhile, trying to avoid police after the shooting, Little J returns to Charles looking for a place to stay. Charles agrees to let him stay at his condominium for a few days, but he later finds Little J’s gun and demands that he leave. Little J punches Charles and knocks him out with a flower vase, then leaves. Greg Burtis checks himself out of rehab and goes to Ted for drugs. When Ted demands cash, Greg robs a liquor store. Returning to Ted’s apartment, he buys drugs, but also adds that he has not slept in four days because of all the amphetamines in his system. Ted gives him an injection to help him calm down and sleep, but advises that he must reduce the amount of “speed” he is taking each day. Back in Hollywood, Crasher tells King that police are looking for him in connection to Tommy Ray’s death. Crasher plans on taking a bus to Dallas, Texas, and invites King and Heather to join him. They like the idea of starting fresh in a new town. Greg wakes up wallowing in his own vomit. The injection Ted gave him was heroin, a drug Greg has never used before. Ted tells Greg he must pay cash for his drugs from now on. Greg gives Ted $20 for a dose of amphetamines. King and Heather come to Ted’s inviting Greg to leave town with them. Greg is too high to be on the streets at the moment, but promises to join them at the bus station at noon the next day. King feels guilty that he told Greg everything would be alright, when he cannot guarantee it. Heather assures him it is fine, saying they all look up to him. She also confesses that she loves King. That night, as Greg walks down a side street, police stop him. When he runs away, the cops arrest him. They question Greg about King and he tells them everything he knows. Later, Greg returns to Ted, who hugs him and tells him that he did the right thing regarding the police. Greg steals heroin from Ted, injects himself and overdoses. He dies in Ted’s apartment, and Ted throws Greg’s body in a dumpster. King and Heather find Little J at the freeway underpass and invite him to join them on the bus to Dallas. For one final night of fun, King, Heather and Little J go to the footbridge and jump onto the train top as it passes. The next day the three get on the bus, but are distressed when Greg does not show up. Just before the bus leaves, King goes to look for Greg. However, police arrive at the bus station looking for King. When Little J sees police holding King at gunpoint, he pulls out his pistol and aims at them. King tries to push Little J’s arm down, but police fire and King is killed. Nine months later, Heather is waiting when Little J is released from jail. The two leave together and start panhandling for money along Hollywood Boulevard.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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