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HISTORY

The film includes intermittent voice-over narration by Lillo Brancato as “Calogero Anello” at age seventeen.
       The following statements appear before end credits: “dedicated to the memory of Robert De Niro, Sr.,” and, “thanks to Sammy Cahn, his lyrics will live forever.” End credits also include “Special thanks” to: “New York City Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre & Broadcasting; International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees; N.Y.C. Police Department, Movie/T.V. Unit; Bob Materasso & Jimmy Lauer, Explosives Unit of the N.Y.C. Fire Department; Joseph Vrana, Deputy Borough Engineer, Bureau of Traffic, D.O.T; Ralph Rosa, Deputy Chief of Signals, Bureau of Traffic, D.O.T; George Dellis, Community Board One; Kathy Mace, 30th Avenue Merchants Association; Residents and Merchants of 30th Avenue, Astoria, Queens; Residents and Merchants of Gravesend Neck Road, Brooklyn; the Belmont Italian American Playhouse.” Thanks are also given to: “Lorenzo and Rose Palminteri; Rose Pascarelli; Mary Kaufman; Dan Lauria; Peter Brant; Peter Rosenthal; Nancy Friedman; Bert Schneiderman; Scotty Fleischer; Bill Nisselson; Stefanie Sacripante; Frank Schulz; Louis D’Agostino; Bryan Unger; Thomas R. O’Donnell, Sr.; Thomas J. O’Donnell, Jr.; Terry Casaletta; Lowell Williams; Maxine Selim; Susan Rose; Chuck Zito; Gino and Dominick Broccoli; Don K. Reed/WCBS-FM 101; Mickey Mantle; the Charalambos Panagiotakos family; Rocco Postiglione & Louise; St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church; Monsignor Ryan; Gregory Pagoulatos; Sophia’s Beauty Salon; Maissa’s Bagel Cafe; Sorriso Pork Store; Fruit Shine Market; Drago Funeral Home; Vaccaro Bakery; Mrki’s Place; China House; Five Boro Enterprises; the Magri Family; Plasterpatch; Antonio & Juana Piccirillo; R&D TV Services; Sheprin Enterprises; John Suric; ECUA Car Service; Flick City Video; Grand Ave. Meat & Poultry, Inc.; Dan Quinn; 44th Street Laundromat; Steve Martini & Astoria Federal Savings & Loan Assoc.; Mario Lalicata; ... More Less

The film includes intermittent voice-over narration by Lillo Brancato as “Calogero Anello” at age seventeen.
       The following statements appear before end credits: “dedicated to the memory of Robert De Niro, Sr.,” and, “thanks to Sammy Cahn, his lyrics will live forever.” End credits also include “Special thanks” to: “New York City Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre & Broadcasting; International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees; N.Y.C. Police Department, Movie/T.V. Unit; Bob Materasso & Jimmy Lauer, Explosives Unit of the N.Y.C. Fire Department; Joseph Vrana, Deputy Borough Engineer, Bureau of Traffic, D.O.T; Ralph Rosa, Deputy Chief of Signals, Bureau of Traffic, D.O.T; George Dellis, Community Board One; Kathy Mace, 30th Avenue Merchants Association; Residents and Merchants of 30th Avenue, Astoria, Queens; Residents and Merchants of Gravesend Neck Road, Brooklyn; the Belmont Italian American Playhouse.” Thanks are also given to: “Lorenzo and Rose Palminteri; Rose Pascarelli; Mary Kaufman; Dan Lauria; Peter Brant; Peter Rosenthal; Nancy Friedman; Bert Schneiderman; Scotty Fleischer; Bill Nisselson; Stefanie Sacripante; Frank Schulz; Louis D’Agostino; Bryan Unger; Thomas R. O’Donnell, Sr.; Thomas J. O’Donnell, Jr.; Terry Casaletta; Lowell Williams; Maxine Selim; Susan Rose; Chuck Zito; Gino and Dominick Broccoli; Don K. Reed/WCBS-FM 101; Mickey Mantle; the Charalambos Panagiotakos family; Rocco Postiglione & Louise; St Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church; Monsignor Ryan; Gregory Pagoulatos; Sophia’s Beauty Salon; Maissa’s Bagel Cafe; Sorriso Pork Store; Fruit Shine Market; Drago Funeral Home; Vaccaro Bakery; Mrki’s Place; China House; Five Boro Enterprises; the Magri Family; Plasterpatch; Antonio & Juana Piccirillo; R&D TV Services; Sheprin Enterprises; John Suric; ECUA Car Service; Flick City Video; Grand Ave. Meat & Poultry, Inc.; Dan Quinn; 44th Street Laundromat; Steve Martini & Astoria Federal Savings & Loan Assoc.; Mario Lalicata; Mr. & Mrs. Lynch; Fresh Look Laundromat; Coffey’s Corner Cafe; the Faculty and Students of William Bryant High School; Dur-All Aluminum; Ed Madary & Aqueduct Racetrack; Angel & Margery Cordero; John Karikas of “Johnny’s Reef,” City Island; Vincent of Vincent Costumes; Peggy Farrell of The Costume Shop, Inc.; Nan Richard; Vincent of B&G Clothing; Maria Ficalora; Doris Raymond; BLS Limousine Service, N.Y.; Paul Change; Helen Hortter/Pepsi-Cola Entertainment; Bulova Watch Corporation; Elaine Wnukowski; Frederick Wildman & Sons, Ltd./Folonari Wine; Stella D'Oro; Frank’s Bike Shop; Centre Firearms; Westclox/Seth Thomas; Swisher International, Inc.; Kathryn Rodger/AIM Promotions; Ed Weinstein/Marion & Co.; Lee Montero & Keith Plaza Associates; the Gus Sclafani Company; John Volpi & Company, Inc.; Auricchio Cheese Company; American Roland Food Corporation; Moretti Beer; Pabst Beer; Bertolli, USA; Eden Foods, Inc.; Ferrara Food Company; Retail Coffee Division of Tetley, Inc.; Allenric Food Distributors, Inc.; Asaro Brothers Company; Filippo Berio; Mr. Nick De Krechewo of Downstairs Records; D’Arrigo Brothers Company of New York, Inc.; Avanti Cigars; Joan Winters; Banfi Vintners Distributors; Richard Gaeta of New York Newsday; Delicato Vineyards; Mr. Vincent Sanders; Relic Records; the Estate of Rocky Marciano; Grandma and the Woo Woo Lady.”
       “Album Covers, 45-RPM Single Picture Sleeves and Photographs used by permission of: The Four Tops; Marvin Gaye; Brenda Holloway; The Isley Brothers; Smokey Robinson; Diana Ross; The Temptations; Tammi Terrell; Jr. Walker & The All-Stars; Stevie Wonder; Walter Gaines; Freddie Gorman; Warren More; Roland White; Mary Wilson; Dwayne A. Brown; IMG Music, Nashville, TN; Bertelsmann Music Group, New York; Motown Record Company.” End credits also acknowledge: “The Supremes and The Temptations are Registered Trademarks of Motown Record Company, L.P., Hollywood, CA, 90028”; “Major League Baseball trademarks depicted in this motion picture were licensed by Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.”; and, “Original Stage Production of A Bronx Tale Directed by Mark W. Travis, performed at Theatre West, Los Angeles and Playhouse 91, New York.”
       A 28 Feb 1991 DV article stated that the story of A Bronx Tale was based on the childhood experiences of Chazz Palminteri, who performed it as a five-minute monologue at Los Angeles, CA’s Theatre West in 1989. Through collaborations with theater director Mark Travis, A Bronx Tale became a one-man stage show, which Palminteri performed in Los Angeles before opening at New York City's Playhouse 91 on 10 Dec 1989. Although an unnamed studio reportedly offered him $1 million for the story rights, Palminteri declined, opting to write the screenplay himself and “fight” to star in the role of “Sonny.” In 1989, the 3 May DV reported that Palminteri had been signed by the William Morris Agency and began writing the script. A year later, the 25 Aug 1990 Screen International named the project as the first film directed by Robert De Niro, who would also star and produce under his company, Tribeca Productions. The 28 Feb 1991 DV stated that De Niro had seen Palminteri’s stage production several times in both New York and Los Angeles. Principal photography was originally expected to begin in May 1991.
       According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Lillo Brancato was invited to audition for the role of teenage Calogero at the Belmont Italian-American Playhouse after being spotted at Jones Beach State Park for his resemblance to De Niro. Taral Hicks was selected from 3,000 actresses for the part of “Jane” after attending an initial casting call and fifteen callbacks in NY.
       In 1992, the 11 May Var announced a new production start date of Jul 1992. A 14 May 1992 HR item noted that the $14 million project would be co-produced by Gatien Productions, Universal Pictures, and the European pay-television service, Le Studio Canal Plus. According to the 15 Jul 1991 HR, Universal and Le Studio Canal Plus had formed a deal to “jointly finance the production and marketing of mainstream feature films for international audiences,” with Universal handling domestic distribution. However, a 9 Sep 1993 HR article stated that Savoy Pictures acquired the project as their first feature film in Mar 1991, due to Universal’s discomfort with the increasing budget. Despite earlier claims that the cost escalated throughout pre-production, producer Jane Rosenthal told the 8 Sep 1993 HR that the picture was originally budgeted at $19 million, which Universal felt was too high. The film’s cost totalled $22 million.
       Various HR production charts indicated that principal photography was frequently postponed throughout Aug 1992, until filming finally began in early Sep 1992. A 21 Dec 1992 Var explained that the delays were caused when De Niro broke his foot and experienced complications obtaining his bus driver’s license. Although the story is set in the Bronx outside New York City, filming took place on 30th Avenue in Astoria, Queens, due to the location’s resemblance to Palminteri’s childhood home. The 9 Sep 1993 HR stated that additional problems were caused by seasonal weather issues related to the delayed start date, faulty period buses, and emergency dental procedures required when nine-year-old Francis Capra lost a tooth. Production took a break for the Christmas 1992 holiday and later resumed for one week of interior filming.
       The 18 Mar 1993 Long Beach Press-Telegram stated that the soundtrack for A Bronx Tale was the first release by Tribeca’s record label, Tribeca Music.
       According to the 16 Sep 1993 HR, the North American premiere took place 14 Sep 1993, as part of the Toronto Festival of Festivals. The film was scheduled to be screened in New York City and Los Angeles before opening 29 Sep 1993 in 1,000 theaters. The 8 Sep 1993 HR reported a conflicting opening date of 1 Oct 1991. The 24 Nov 1993 HR stated that Savoy Pictures took a $3.2 million “write-off” on the film.
       The 7 Oct 1993 LAT stated that stage director Mark Travis sued filmmakers, alleging that he helped develop the story from Palminteri’s five-minute monologue and wrote the first draft of the feature film screenplay, but was ultimately omitted from a verbal contract guaranteeing him ten percent of the script’s $1.5 million sale. The outcome of the lawsuit could not be determined. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
3 May 1989.
---
Daily Variety
28 Feb 1991.
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Hollywood Reporter
15 Jul 1991
p. 1, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 1992
p. 9, 96.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 1992
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Sep 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 1993
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Sep 1993
p. 5, 30.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Sep 1993
p. 3, 34.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 1993.
---
Long Beach Press-Telegram
18 Mar 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
29 Sep 1993
Section F, p. 1, 6.
Los Angeles Times
7 Oct 1993.
---
New York Times
29 Sep 1993
Section C, p. 13, 17.
Screen International
25 Aug 1990.
---
Variety
11 May 1992.
---
Variety
21 Dec 1992.
---
Variety
27 Sep 1993
p. 35, 38.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Doo Wop Group (Street):
[and]
Doo Wop Group (School):
Satan's messengers:
[and]
Chez Bippy customers:
Jockeys:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
a Savoy Pictures release
Price Entertainment in association with Penta Entertainment presents
a Tribeca production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Asst prod
Exec prod
WRITER
Scr
based on his play
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Key grip
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Panaglide op
Video playback
Best boy elec
Elec
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Company grip
Shop elec
Addl cam op
Addl cam op
Addl cam asst
Addl cam asst
Addl cam asst
Panavision® cameras provided by
Lighting & grip package provided by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboards
Art dept coord
Art dept prod asst
Art dept prod asst
FILM EDITORS
Assoc picture ed
1st asst picture ed
Asst picture ed
Apprentice picture ed
Negative cont
Avid™ non-linear editing provided by
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
Key const grip
Scenic chargeman
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Best boy dresser
On set dresser
1st dresser
Asst prop master
Cam scenic
Best boy const grip
Const grip
Const grip
Const grip
Const grip
Const grip
Const grip
Const grip
Const foreman
Shop foreman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
2d scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic shop person
Scenic shop person
Dresser
Dresser
Dresser
Dresser
Dresser
Dresser
Dresser
Dresser
Set dec prod asst
Const shop prod asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Asst to the cost des
Asst to the cost des
Asst to the cost des
Asst to the cost des
Asst to the cost des
Asst to the cost des
Asst to the cost des
Ward supv
Ward supv
Costumer
Seamstress
Seamstress
Addl ward
Addl ward
Addl ward
Ward prod asst
Select ward provided by
Select ward provided by
Select ward provided by, JMS/Strutters
Select ward provided by
Select ward provided by
Custom shirts by
of L. Allmeier
MUSIC
Orig mus
Mus supv
Exec mus consultant
Exec mus coord
Asst mus supv
Mus office coord
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Theme orch & cond by
Mus rec eng
Mus rec eng
Score rec at
NYC
Digital mus editing system provided by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
1st asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
ADR eng
ADR boom
Foley rec
Foley walker
Sd transfers
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
1st asst spec eff
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Main and end titles des by
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Key makeup and hair supv
Makeup and hair for Mr. De Niro
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
2d makeup
Addl makeup
Addl makeup
Addl hair
Addl hair
Addl hair
Addl hair
Wigs made by
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Post prod supv
Scr supv
Asst to Mr. De Niro
Prod office coord
Loc mgr
Prod auditor
Asst prod office coord
Asst loc mgr
Principal casting assoc
Bronx casting assoc
Extras casting
Extras casting asst
Extras casting asst
Principal casting asst
Tech consultant
Unit pub
Asst auditor
Asst auditor
Accounting asst
Prod assoc
Prod secy
Office prod asst
Office prod asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Asst to Ms. Rosenthal
Prod asst to Mr. De Niro
Prod asst to Mr. Palminteri
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Black Filmmakers Foundation trainee
Post prod office coord
Post prod accountant
Post prod intern
Security
Shop mgr
Parking coord
Catering
Asst chef
Helper
Craft service
Craft service
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Picture car coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Addl set prod asst
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Prod intern
Picture car asst
Picture car asst
Picture car asst
Picture car asst
Picture car asst
Picture car asst
Payroll provided by
Legal services provided by
Completion guarantee provided by
Insurance provided by
Insurance provided by
Offices and screening rooms provided by
Tech coord
Picture cars provided by
Animals provided by
Children's tutoring provided by
Sports audio courtesy of
Comics used by permission of
New York, NY
STAND INS
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt player
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Film processing by
N.Y.
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play A Bronx Tale by Chazz Palminteri (production date undetermined).
SONGS
"Streets Of The Bronx," written by Butch Barbella, performed by Cool Change, published by Bella-Teri Music
"I Wonder Why," written by Ricardo Weeks, Ade Olayinka, performed by Dion & The Belmonts, published by 3 Seas Music Publishing Co., under license from CEMA Special Markets
"Little Girl Of Mine," written by Morris Levy, Herbert Cox, performed by The Cleftones, published by Longitude Music Co., courtesy of EMI Records Ltd. and Rhino Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
+
SONGS
"Streets Of The Bronx," written by Butch Barbella, performed by Cool Change, published by Bella-Teri Music
"I Wonder Why," written by Ricardo Weeks, Ade Olayinka, performed by Dion & The Belmonts, published by 3 Seas Music Publishing Co., under license from CEMA Special Markets
"Little Girl Of Mine," written by Morris Levy, Herbert Cox, performed by The Cleftones, published by Longitude Music Co., courtesy of EMI Records Ltd. and Rhino Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Same Old Song And Dance," written by Bobby Worth, Sammy Cahn, Jimmy Van Heusen, performed by Frank Sinatra, published by Leonard - Worth Songs, Cahn Music Co. and Barton Music Corp., All rights on behalf of Cahn Music administered by WB Music Corp., courtesy of Capitol Records under license from CEMA Special Markets
"Don't You Know?" written by Bobby Worth, performed by Della Reese, published by Alexis Music, Inc., courtesy of The RCA Records Label of BMG Music
"Don't You Just Know It," written by Huey "Piano" Smith, performed by Bobby Marchan and The Clowns, published by Cotillion Music, Inc., administered by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., courtesy of Ace Records, by arrangement with Reel Beats
"Flamenco Sketches," written by Miles Davis, performed by Miles Davis, published by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp. & Jazz Horn Music, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"For Your Precious Love," written by Jerry Butler, Arthur Brooks, Richard Brooks, performed by Jerry Butler, published by Sunflower Music Inc., courtesy of Vee-Jay Limited Partnership
"Ain't That A Kick In The Head," written by James Van Heusen, Sammy Cahn, performed by Dean Martin, published by Maraville Music Corp., courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"Sole Malato," written by Domenico Modugno, Richard Pazzaglia, performed by Domenico Modugno, published by Edizioni Curci S.R.L., courtesy of Carosello Records & Tapes
"Ruby," written by Mitchell Parish and Heinz Roemheld, performed by Adam Wade, used by permission of EMI Miller Catalog Inc., courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"A Beautiful Morning," written by Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati, Jr., performed by The Rascals, used by permission of Purple Records Dist. Corp./Fun City Music Corp./Delicious Apple Music Corp., courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Tell It Like It Is," written by George Davis, Lee Diamond, copyright 1966, performed by Aaron Neville, published by Conrad Music, a division of Arc Music Corp. & Olrap Publishing Co., Inc., courtesy of Par-Lo Enterprises, Inc., by arrangement with Celebrity Licensing, Inc.
"I Need Your Lovin," written by Don Gardner, Morris Levy, Clarence Lewis and James McDougal, performed by Don Gardner and Dee Dee Ford, published by Longitude Music Co./Pete Music, courtesy of Arista Records, Inc.
"Bustalk," written by Robert M. Watson, performed by Bobby Watson, published by Lafiya Music, Bobby Watson appears courtesy of Columbia Records
"I Only Have Eyes For You," written by Harry Warren, Al Dubin, performed by Gerry Niewood, published by Warner Bros. Inc.
"Ninety-Nine And A Half (Won't Do), written by Steve Cropper, Eddie Floyd, Wilson Pickett, copyright 1966, performed by Wilson Pickett, published by Irving Music, Inc., administered in the U.S. & Canada: Pronto Music, Inc., courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"When Joanna Loved Me," written by Robert Wells, Jack Segal, performed by Tony Bennett, published by Wells Music Inc. and Helton Music, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Say It (Over And Over Again)," written by Jimmy McHugh, Frank Loesser, performed by John Coltrane, published by Famous Music Corporation, courtesy of MCA Records
"Come Together," words and music by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, performed by The Beatles, copyright 1969, rights controlled and administered by Music Corporation of America, Inc., under license from Northern Songs, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"Ten Commandments of Love," written by Marshall Paul, copyright 1958 (Renewed), performed by The Moonglows, published by Arc Music Corporation, courtesy of MCA Records
"I Only Have Eyes For You," written by Harry Warren, Al Dubin, performed by The Complexions, published by Warner Bros. Inc.
"I Only Have Eyes For You," written by Harry Warren, Al Dubin, performed by The Flamingos, published by Warner Bros. Inc., courtesy of EMI Records Ltd. and Rhino Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"To Be With You," written by Nick Jiminez, William Torres, performed by Joe Cuba Sextette, published by Aurea Music, Secco Records by special arrangement with Timeless Entertainment Corp.
"Cleo's Mood," written by Autry Dewalt, Willie Woods, Harvey Fuqua, performed by Jr. Walker and The All Stars, published by Stone Agate Music, courtesy of Motown Record Company L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
"Hawg For You," written by Otis Redding, performed by Otis Redding, published by Irving Music, Inc., courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Nights In White Satin," written by Justin Hayward, performed by The Moody Blues, published by Essex Music Inc., courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets
"Baby I Need Your Loving," written by Brian Holland, Edward Holland, Lamont Dozier, performed by The Four Tops, published by Stone Agate Music, courtesy of Motown Record Company L.P., by arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
"You Really Got Me," written by Ray Davies, performed by The Kinks, published by Jayboy Music Inc., courtesy of Rhino Records
"All Along The Watchtower," written by Bob Dylan, performed by The Jimi Hendrix Experience, published by Dwarf Music, courtesy of Elber B.V.
"I'm So Proud," written by Curtis Mayfield, performed by The Impressions, published by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., courtesy of MCA Records
"Strange Brew," written by Felix Pappalardi, Gail Collins, Eric Clapton, performed by Cream, published by Eric Clapton and Windfall Music, all rights on behalf of Eric Clapton, administered by Unichappell Music, Inc., courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets
"It's A Man's Man's Man's World," written by James Brown, Betty Newsome, performed by James Brown, published by Dynstone Publishing Co., Clamike Music., all rights on behalf of Dynstone Publishing Co., administered by Unichappell Music, Inc., courtesy of Polygram Special Markets
"Cristo Redentor," written by Duke Pearson, performed by Donald Byrd, published by Gailantcy Music Co., courtesy of Blue Note Records, a division of Capitol Records, Inc., courtesy of Reprise Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"That's Life," written by Dean Kay, Kelly Gordon, performed by Frank Sinatra, published by PolyGram International Publishing Inc., courtesy of Reprise Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Streets Of The Bronx," written by Butch Barbella, vocal performance by Cool Change, Bells & String Orchestra conducted by Stephen Endelman, published by Bella-Teri Music
"Ave Maria," written by Franz Schubert, performed by the Daughters of St. Paul, Boston, MA, arranged by Kurt Kaiser, courtesy of Daughters of St. Paul.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 September 1993
Premiere Information:
Toronto premiere: 14 September 1993
Los Angeles opening: 29 September 1993
New York opening: week of 29 September 1993
Production Date:
began late August or early September 1992
Copyright Claimant:
BT Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 October 1993
Copyright Number:
PA659530
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Duration(in mins):
121
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32537
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1960, Italian-American bus driver Lorenzo Anello lives with his wife, Rosina, and son, Calogero, in the Fordham area of the Bronx, New York. At age nine, Calogero develops an interest in the lives of various neighborhood mobsters led by a Mafia boss named Sonny. When Rosina catches Calogero spying on Sonny at the bar next door, Lorenzo warns him to stay on their front stoop. The boy agrees, but he and his friends continue to watch the mobsters argue on the street. Calogero witnesses Sonny defending a friend by murdering a man over a disputed parking space. When police ask him to identify the killer in a line-up, Calogero lies and says Sonny was not responsible. One afternoon, one of Sonny’s men offers Lorenzo a job, but he chooses not to get involved with mobsters for fear of losing his job with the city. Feeling increasingly guilty about his decision to lie, Calogero attends confession. After Sonny invites Calogero inside to talk, the boy begins serving coffee at the bar and participating in the Mafia’s basement dice games, which earn him hundreds of dollars and the nickname, “C.” Despite his wife Rosina’s suggestion that they keep the winnings, Lorenzo angrily marches into Sonny’s bar and returns the cash. He attempts to defend his honor as a “working man” by reminding his son that people remain loyal to Sonny out of fear, not love. Over the next eight years, Calogero disobeys his promise to stay away from the Mafia and befriends Sonny as he gains prominence within the community. Seventeen-year-old Calogero accompanies Sonny to the racetrack and spends time with his peers at a social club called “Deuces Wild,” ... +


In 1960, Italian-American bus driver Lorenzo Anello lives with his wife, Rosina, and son, Calogero, in the Fordham area of the Bronx, New York. At age nine, Calogero develops an interest in the lives of various neighborhood mobsters led by a Mafia boss named Sonny. When Rosina catches Calogero spying on Sonny at the bar next door, Lorenzo warns him to stay on their front stoop. The boy agrees, but he and his friends continue to watch the mobsters argue on the street. Calogero witnesses Sonny defending a friend by murdering a man over a disputed parking space. When police ask him to identify the killer in a line-up, Calogero lies and says Sonny was not responsible. One afternoon, one of Sonny’s men offers Lorenzo a job, but he chooses not to get involved with mobsters for fear of losing his job with the city. Feeling increasingly guilty about his decision to lie, Calogero attends confession. After Sonny invites Calogero inside to talk, the boy begins serving coffee at the bar and participating in the Mafia’s basement dice games, which earn him hundreds of dollars and the nickname, “C.” Despite his wife Rosina’s suggestion that they keep the winnings, Lorenzo angrily marches into Sonny’s bar and returns the cash. He attempts to defend his honor as a “working man” by reminding his son that people remain loyal to Sonny out of fear, not love. Over the next eight years, Calogero disobeys his promise to stay away from the Mafia and befriends Sonny as he gains prominence within the community. Seventeen-year-old Calogero accompanies Sonny to the racetrack and spends time with his peers at a social club called “Deuces Wild,” where the boys smoke cigarettes, catcall women, and debate about the neighborhood’s growing African-American population. While riding on his father’s bus route one afternoon, Calogero locks eyes with a pretty African-American girl, and is instantly smitten. Later, Sonny schools him on the lessons of political philosopher Niccolo Machiavelli and reminds him to always make himself “available” for his friends. One day at school, Calogero sees the girl from the bus, but resists talking to her while surrounded by his friends. Once alone, she introduces herself as Jane Williams and invites him to the movies the next day. He walks her home, but is forced to stop one block away from her house to prevent being seen together by a group of confrontational African-American boys standing outside. Later, one of Calogero’s friends viciously beats two black boys bicycling down their street while Calogero tries in vain to stop them. Sonny warns him not to get involved with their racist antics, and encourages him to pursue a relationship with Jane even though his father disapproves. Borrowing Sonny’s convertible for his date with Jane, Calogero finds she is irate because her brother Willy was a victim of the previous day’s beatings. Although the young Italian denies his involvement, Willy identifies him as one of the assailants, which angers Calogero and prompts him to use a racial slur. Disgusted, Jane leaves, and the boy returns home. Lorenzo sees his son driving Sonny’s car, and lectures him about the danger of his loyalty to Sonny. That night, Sonny yells at Calogero for returning his car with a faulty engine, but Lorenzo intervenes. Sonny’s men punch Lorenzo in the stomach and drive away as Calogero meets up with his friends, who vow revenge on the African-American boys for spattering their social club with raw eggs. Although he does not approve of their actions, Calogero is afraid of being called a coward and goes along with their plan. However, Sonny pulls him out of the car before they leave the neighborhood. Afterward, Calogero runs into Jane, who apologizes for the misunderstanding and kisses him when he declares his desire to be with her. Suddenly remembering that his friends still intend to carry out their plan, Calogero gets into his car with Jane and drives to stop them. He arrives too late, and finds that his friends were killed when a Molotov cocktail exploded in their car. Realizing he owes Sonny for saving his life, he runs back to his neighborhood to thank him. As Calogaro wades through the crowd inside Sonny’s bar, the son of the man Sonny shot eight years earlier discreetly sidles up to crime boss and shoots him in the head. At the funeral, a mourner named Carmine approaches Calogero at the casket and introduces himself as the man whose life Sonny saved during the same parking space dispute. As Carmine leaves Calogero alone, Lorenzo arrives to offer thanks that Sonny watched over his son through the years. Together, father and son leave the funeral parlor and walk home as a “doo-wop” group sings under the light of the streetlamp. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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