Equinox (1993)

R | 108 mins | Melodrama, Mystery | 16 June 1993

Director:

Alan Rudolph

Writer:

Alan Rudolph

Producer:

David Blocker

Cinematographer:

Elliot Davis

Editor:

Michael Ruscio

Production Designer:

Steven Legler

Production Company:

SC Entertainment International
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HISTORY

According to the 20 Sep 1991 HR, principal photography was set to begin on 27 Sep 1991 and would continue for six-weeks, with locations in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN.
       The 25 Oct 1991 HR reported that St. Paul merchants were petitioning the City Council with a complaint against filmmakers for adversely interrupting their businesses when they closed down several streets for filming. However, the film’s publicist argued that the production was boosting the local economy.
       On 27 Oct 1991, during the final week of production, director Alan Rudolph had to contend with crowds from a World Series baseball game at the Metrodome, two blocks away from filming locations, according to the 8 Nov 1991 HR. Five days after the Minnesota Twins won the World Series, a history-making storm covered the city in twenty-seven inches of snow in twenty-four hours. Despite the disruptions, Rudolph reportedly completed principal photography on time and under budget.
       The 18 Feb 1994 HR announced a lawsuit was filed by film investors Midland Bank PLC, against film processor Alpha Cine Laboratory Inc. The suit cited “breach of contract,” claiming film footage of Equinox was wrongfully given to SC Entertainment, despite the latter’s defaulting on a $4.4 million investment promised to Midland Bank PLC.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Her Grace Is All She Has,” “Bee! I’m Expecting You!” “I Cannot Meet The Spring Unmoved,” by Emily Dickinson, reprinted by permission of the publishers and the Trustees of Amherst College from The Poems of Emily Dickinson, Thomas H. Johnson, ed. Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University ... More Less

According to the 20 Sep 1991 HR, principal photography was set to begin on 27 Sep 1991 and would continue for six-weeks, with locations in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN.
       The 25 Oct 1991 HR reported that St. Paul merchants were petitioning the City Council with a complaint against filmmakers for adversely interrupting their businesses when they closed down several streets for filming. However, the film’s publicist argued that the production was boosting the local economy.
       On 27 Oct 1991, during the final week of production, director Alan Rudolph had to contend with crowds from a World Series baseball game at the Metrodome, two blocks away from filming locations, according to the 8 Nov 1991 HR. Five days after the Minnesota Twins won the World Series, a history-making storm covered the city in twenty-seven inches of snow in twenty-four hours. Despite the disruptions, Rudolph reportedly completed principal photography on time and under budget.
       The 18 Feb 1994 HR announced a lawsuit was filed by film investors Midland Bank PLC, against film processor Alpha Cine Laboratory Inc. The suit cited “breach of contract,” claiming film footage of Equinox was wrongfully given to SC Entertainment, despite the latter’s defaulting on a $4.4 million investment promised to Midland Bank PLC.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: “Her Grace Is All She Has,” “Bee! I’m Expecting You!” “I Cannot Meet The Spring Unmoved,” by Emily Dickinson, reprinted by permission of the publishers and the Trustees of Amherst College from The Poems of Emily Dickinson, Thomas H. Johnson, ed. Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, copyright © 1951, 1955, 1979, 1983, by the President and Fellows of Harvard College.” Also acknowledged: “Reginald Marsh’s Hudson Bay Fur Company, reproduced courtesy of the Columbia [sic] Museum of Art, Ohio: Howald Fund Purchase, 1956.” Additional acknowledgements include: “The Producer Wishes to Thank: The cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota Film Board, Moab Film Commission, Bernard Abrams, Harriet Reisman, Allan Schouela, Gina M. Resnick, Connie Simmons Spikerman, Keith Fleer, James Mulholland, Stewart Brookman, Don Schneider, Alan Salzman, Steven Ransohoff, Janet Zahn, Arthur F. Stribley, Heidi Buss, William Goldstein, Fuller-O’Brien Paints, Steve Debitzer, O’Brien Corporation, Lonnie Ramati, West Publishing Co., Frederick Leopold, Llyn Adalist, Silk Purse, Jody Silverman, Manfred Eicher.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 May 1992
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Sep 1992
p. 6, 38.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Oct 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1994.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 Jun 1993
p. 3.
New York Times
8 Sep 1993
p. 20.
Variety
25 May 1992
p. 53.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Nicolas Stiliadis and Syd Cappe
SC Entertainment International
A David Blocker production
A film by Alan Rudolph
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Steadicam/2d cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d cam/1st asst cam
Video assist op
Video playback op
Still photog
Key/Dolly grip
Best boy grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Rigging gaffer
Elec
Genny op
Addl grip/elec
Aerial cam
Asst aerial cam
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Asst art dir
Art dept intern
Art dept intern
Art dept intern
Art dept intern
Art dept intern
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
Assoc film ed
2d asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Loc ed asst
Loc ed asst
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
2d asst prop
Lead scenic artist
Const coord
On-set dresser
Lead person
Lead person
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Asst set dec
Asst set dec
Const foreman
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Scenic
Scenic
Const prod asst
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key costumer
Set costumer
Asst des/Seamstress
Costumer
SOUND
Supv re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv sd ed
Prod sd mixer
Boom person
Cable person
Dial/Foley ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec
ADR mixer
ADR rec
Looping group
Looping group, coord, Reel Talent
Sd post prod facilities
Sd post prod facilities, The Saul Zaentz Co. Film
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Asst spec eff
Visual eff supv
Motion control op
Motion control tech
Motion control eff
Split screen opticals
Titles & optical eff
Title des
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Key hairstylist
Asst makeup/hair
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Helicopter pilot
Unit mgr
Asst to Mr. Rudolph
Asst to Mr. Blocker
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Los Angeles coord
Loc mgr
Asst locs
Asst locs
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Picture car coord
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod controller
Asst prod accountant
Casting asst
Loc casting & extras
Video prod cam
Video prod cam
Video prod ed
Video post-prod services
Video post-prod services
Video prod sd
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Loc projectionist
Craft service
Craft service asst
First aid
Machine room supv/rec
Machine room op/projectionist
Moab loc asst
Prod legal services
Addl legal services
Addl legal services
Completion bond
Completion bond, Film Finances, Inc.
Insurance, Near North Insurance Brokerage, Inc.
Prod financing provided by
a Division of Imperial Bank
Partial financing provided by
Financing arranged in part by
SC Entertainment International prod controller
Asst to exec prods
Asst to exec prods
Post prod accounting
Post prod accounting, Prep Shoot Post
Computer systems consultant
Travel arrangements
Travel arrangements
Unit pub
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt coord
Stand-in
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col and dailies by
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“Once Upon A Time,” written and performed by Terje Rypdal, courtesy of ECM Records
“Eos,” written by Terje Rypdal, performed by Terje Rypdal and David Darling, courtesy of ECM Records
“Mirage,” written by Terje Rypdal, performed by Terje Rypdal and David Darling, courtesy of ECM Records
+
SONGS
“Once Upon A Time,” written and performed by Terje Rypdal, courtesy of ECM Records
“Eos,” written by Terje Rypdal, performed by Terje Rypdal and David Darling, courtesy of ECM Records
“Mirage,” written by Terje Rypdal, performed by Terje Rypdal and David Darling, courtesy of ECM Records
“Ambiguity,” written and performed by Terje Rypdal, courtesy of ECM Records
“Mystery Man,” written and performed by Terje Rypdal, courtesy of ECM Records
“Flight,” written and performed by Miroslav Vitous, Terje Rypdal & Jack DeJohnette, courtesy of ECM Records
“Og Hva Synes Vi Om Det,” written by Terje Rypdal, Bjorn Kjellemyr and Audun Kleive, performed by Terje Rypdal & The Chasers, courtesy of ECM Records
“Symphonic Dances - Opus 45,” written by Sergei Rachmaninov, performed by Reah Sadowsky
“Al Bine,” written and performed by Ali Farka Touré, courtesy of World Circuit Ltd., in association with Mango - A Polygram/Island Records Co.
“Don’t Blame Me,” written by Jimmy McHugh and Dorthy Fields
“Istoria Na Edna Lyubov,” written by Ivo Papasov, (published by Hamilcar Music ASCAP/PRS), performed by Ivo Papasov and His Orchestra, (featuring Maria Karafezieka), (courtesy of Hannibal Records, a division of Rykodisc, Inc.)
“I'm In The Mood For Love,” violin performance by John Helde, written by Jimmy McHugh and Dorthy [sic] Fields
“Left Alone,” written by Billie Holiday and Mal Waldron, performed by Archie Shepp & Dollar Brand, courtesy of Denon/Nippon Columbia Co., Ltd., by special arrangement with Warner Special Products
“Milonga Del Angel,” written and performed by Astor Piazzolla, from the Astor Piazzolla "Tango: Zero Hour," produced by Kip Hanrahan, courtesy of American Clave Records and Editorial Lagos S.R.I.
“Pachelbel Kanon,” written by Johann Pachelbel, performed by Daniel Kohialka & Andy Kulberg, courtesy of Li-Sem Enterprises
“Temptation,” written by Arthur Freed and Nacio Brown
Piano Pieces performed by Ken Payson, produced by Rick Krizman.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 June 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 16 June 1993
New York opening: 8 September 1993
Production Date:
27 September--early November 1991
Copyright Claimant:
SC Entertainment International
Copyright Date:
27 October 1993
Copyright Number:
PA644597
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
108
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31752
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

An elderly woman named Helena collapses on a city street, and gives a sealed letter she has carried with her for years to her friend for safe-keeping. Helena dies from pneumonia and is declared “unknown” when she arrives at the morgue. Aspiring writer Sonya Kirk, who works there, takes the letter from Helena’s personal belongings, and plans to use it as inspiration for a novel. The contents of the letter are slowly revealed, and Sonya begins investigating the details of Helena’s life. Elsewhere, introverted Henry Petosa dreams of traveling the world and escaping the chaotic city. Meanwhile, Henry’s twin brother, Freddy Ace, from whom he was separated at birth, works as a driver for a group of gangsters. Freddy goes to an Italian restaurant called the Villa Capri with fellow driver Richie Nunn, where, behind his boss’s back, they threaten owner, Eddie Gutierrez, to give them protection money. Afterward, Freddy gets into a fistfight with Richie Nunn. Henry is visited by his pretty neighbor, Rosie Rivers, who barges into his apartment and forces him to watch her infant son. Rosie, a prostitute, leaves for an hour to meet a client. Elsewhere, Freddy returns home to his wife, Sharon Ace, and their twin daughters. He makes love to his wife and celebrates his promotion to be Mr. Paris‘ personal driver. Rosie returns to Henry’s house and kisses him in gratitude. Sometime later, Henry goes to his job at Petosa & Son Garage, where he works as a mechanic for his father, Pete Petosa. His father wants to sell the garage and retire, and offers to give ... +


An elderly woman named Helena collapses on a city street, and gives a sealed letter she has carried with her for years to her friend for safe-keeping. Helena dies from pneumonia and is declared “unknown” when she arrives at the morgue. Aspiring writer Sonya Kirk, who works there, takes the letter from Helena’s personal belongings, and plans to use it as inspiration for a novel. The contents of the letter are slowly revealed, and Sonya begins investigating the details of Helena’s life. Elsewhere, introverted Henry Petosa dreams of traveling the world and escaping the chaotic city. Meanwhile, Henry’s twin brother, Freddy Ace, from whom he was separated at birth, works as a driver for a group of gangsters. Freddy goes to an Italian restaurant called the Villa Capri with fellow driver Richie Nunn, where, behind his boss’s back, they threaten owner, Eddie Gutierrez, to give them protection money. Afterward, Freddy gets into a fistfight with Richie Nunn. Henry is visited by his pretty neighbor, Rosie Rivers, who barges into his apartment and forces him to watch her infant son. Rosie, a prostitute, leaves for an hour to meet a client. Elsewhere, Freddy returns home to his wife, Sharon Ace, and their twin daughters. He makes love to his wife and celebrates his promotion to be Mr. Paris‘ personal driver. Rosie returns to Henry’s house and kisses him in gratitude. Sometime later, Henry goes to his job at Petosa & Son Garage, where he works as a mechanic for his father, Pete Petosa. His father wants to sell the garage and retire, and offers to give Henry money to travel. Freddy Ace begins driving Mr. Paris around town. Paris warns him against secretly conducting illegal business with Richie Nunn, and asks Freddy if it is true he grew up in an orphanage. Freddy confirms the information, but offers no further details. Russell Franks invites Henry to dinner with him and his sister, Beverly Franks. However, because of an awkward date with Beverly, during which they made love, Henry is reluctant to see her again. When he repeatedly telephones her and hangs up when she answers, Beverly suspects it is Henry calling. In time, Rosie returns to visit Henry, and surprises him by performing a sexual act on him. Afterward, Henry asks about her occupation as a prostitute, and encourages Rosie to leave Red, her pimp boyfriend, promising to take care of her. Shortly after, Red arrives and slaps Rosie in the face. Henry comes to her defense, and during their fistfight, he accidentally pushes Red down a flight of stairs. Worried that Red will retaliate, Rosie flees with her crying child. Meanwhile, Sonya Kirk learns that a man named Emmanuel sent the letter to Helena, and that he set up a “blind trust” account with an attorney named Jerome Hamner. Sonya pretends to be Helena’s biographer, and seeks a meeting with Jerome, but is told by his daughter, Judith Hamner, that her busy father has no time to meet with her. However, when Sonya possesses the secret codeword, “equinox,” to access the account, she is granted a meeting with Jerome. Sonya asks for his help in assembling Helena’s life story. Together, they determine that Emanuel and Helena were in love, but after she became pregnant with twins, Helena discovered that Emanuel already had a wife and children in Europe. Helena ended her relationship with Emanuel and gave the twins up for adoption, never knowing that Emanuel had left a $200,000 trust for her and the boys. Although Emanuel included the information to Helena in a letter, she never opened it. Soon after, Emmanuel died in a racecar accident. Sonya Kirk is curious what became of the sons, and agrees to track them down. Judith Hamner offers her a share of the retainer’s fee her father’s firm will receive when the trust is legally distributed. Meanwhile, Henry meets Russell and Beverly Franks for dinner at the Villa Capri. Russell is infatuated with waitress Anna Gutierrez, the owner’s daughter, and leaves his table to talk to her. While he is gone, Beverly asks Henry why he never called her after they slept together. Henry shares his confused feelings, and Beverly wonders if he is schizophrenic. Richie Nunn comes into the restaurant to threaten owner Eddie Gutierrez for money, and Russell witnesses the harassment. Richie Nunn sees Henry at a table and mistakes him for Freddy Ace. He shouts at the confused young man through the window, convinced that Freddy is conducting business without him. After dinner, Henry escorts Beverly home and frantically tries to make love to her. Beverly chastises him, demanding he slow down, and invites him over for dinner the following night. Elsewhere, Freddy kills Richie Nunn when he learns he was doing business behind Mr. Paris’s back. Henry returns home to see Rosie Rivers’ dead body being taken away on a gurney. Sonya Kirk researches adoption records and learns that one of Helena’s sons is named Henry Petosa. Meanwhile, Beverly cooks dinner for Henry, and he invites her to travel the world with him on the money he receives from the sale of his father’s business. Sometime later, Russell Franks shows Henry a gun, and tells him he plans to protect Anna, the waitress at the Villa Capri, from the gangsters harassing her and her father. Freddy is unhappy working for Mr. Paris. Sonya Kirk pretends to be writing a story about a garage owner and asks Pete Petosa if she can interview him. She learns that Pete never told his son, Henry, that he was adopted. Sometime later, Henry gives Beverly a necklace, and she professes her love. However, she is reluctant to go away with him. Henry meets Russell Franks at the Villa Capri, and tells him he loves his sister, Beverly, and is taking her away from the city. Meanwhile, Freddy Ace and a gangster named Virgil arrive at the Villa Capri, and Freddy notes that it is the night of the Autumnal equinox. In Eddie Gutierrez’s office, Anna tries to protect her father from Freddy’s bullying. When Virgil enters the dining room, Russell suspects he is a gangster, and forces Henry to give him his gun. Russell points the gun at Virgil, and a fistfight ensues. Henry joins in and also takes a beating from Virgil. Freddy sees the commotion from the other room, but continues his business. During the scuffle, Anna enters and shoots Virgil. Outside, Sonya Kirk walks toward the Villa Capri and hears the gunshot. Meanwhile, Freddy enters the dining room, and Anna points her gun at him. As Freddy hides behind a wall, he comes face to face with his twin brother, Henry. The two men stare at each other in surprise, as Anna shoots Freddy. She screams in horror at what she has done, and gives the gun to her father. Henry follows the injured Freddy into the alleyway, and watches him die. Henry runs to the garage, takes some money and leaves a note for his father. He drives to Beverly’s home and sounds the horn, shouting to her from the street. He insists they leave immediately, but Beverly begs him to come inside and talk to her. Henry shouts his love for her before driving away. Sometime later, Sonya Kirk tells Beverly about Freddy Ace’s death, and explains that he was Henry’s brother. Beverly worries that Henry will never return and weeps that she missed her chance to be with him. Elsewhere, Henry arrives at a diner in the desert. He sees a woman with twin sons, and becomes emotionally distraught. Beverly waits for Henry’s telephone call as he stands on the edge of a canyon. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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