Fearless (1993)

R | 120 mins | Drama | 15 October 1993

Director:

Peter Weir

Writer:

Rafael Yglesias

Cinematographer:

Allen Daviau

Production Designer:

John Stoddart

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures
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HISTORY

The name of second unit director of photography Tom Connole is misspelled as "Tom Cannole."
       A 24 Aug 1992 Publishers Weekly item referenced the recent acquisition of Rafael Yglesias’s yet unpublished novel, Fearless, to be adapted by Spring Creek Productions for Warner Bros. Pictures. According to the 28 Apr 1992 HR and 24 Jul 1992 Screen International, the production used the working titles Joy Ride and Joyride before it reverted to the original title, Fearless.
       The 30 Nov 1992 DV stated that principal photography began on 24 Aug 1992 in San Francisco, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files list the following locations: an apartment on Russian Hill; a house in the Mission District; the Church of Saints Peter and Paul in North Beach; a rooftop in the financial district; a ferry on the bay; and an abandoned freeway ramp.
       After a month in San Francisco, the production spent a week shooting the airplane crash in Bakersfield, CA. An eighty-five-acre field of corn was planted specially for the film, and the aircraft was constructed from parts salvaged at the Aviation Warehouse junkyard. Assistance was provided by Pacific Gas and Electric, and forty members of the Kern County and Bakersfield fire departments. Principal photography concluded on locations around Los Angeles, CA, and on sound stages at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, CA.
       Following a limited engagement in just eight theaters beginning ... More Less

The name of second unit director of photography Tom Connole is misspelled as "Tom Cannole."
       A 24 Aug 1992 Publishers Weekly item referenced the recent acquisition of Rafael Yglesias’s yet unpublished novel, Fearless, to be adapted by Spring Creek Productions for Warner Bros. Pictures. According to the 28 Apr 1992 HR and 24 Jul 1992 Screen International, the production used the working titles Joy Ride and Joyride before it reverted to the original title, Fearless.
       The 30 Nov 1992 DV stated that principal photography began on 24 Aug 1992 in San Francisco, CA. Production notes in AMPAS library files list the following locations: an apartment on Russian Hill; a house in the Mission District; the Church of Saints Peter and Paul in North Beach; a rooftop in the financial district; a ferry on the bay; and an abandoned freeway ramp.
       After a month in San Francisco, the production spent a week shooting the airplane crash in Bakersfield, CA. An eighty-five-acre field of corn was planted specially for the film, and the aircraft was constructed from parts salvaged at the Aviation Warehouse junkyard. Assistance was provided by Pacific Gas and Electric, and forty members of the Kern County and Bakersfield fire departments. Principal photography concluded on locations around Los Angeles, CA, and on sound stages at Warner Bros. Studios in Burbank, CA.
       Following a limited engagement in just eight theaters beginning 15 Oct 1993, items in the 2 Nov 1993 and 8 Nov 1993 DV stated that Warner Bros. expanded the picture to 124 theaters and 749 theaters over the following weekends, bringing in cumulative earnings of $3.8 million to date. Several critics praised the performances by the principal actors, including Rosie Perez, who earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress in a Supporting Role.
       End credits include the following acknowledgments: “‘Les Fanatiques’, Rene Magritte, copyright 1992 © Herscovici/ARS New York; ‘Lequeu, An Architectural Enigma’/Duboy. MIY Press Publication; ‘The Ascent into the Empyream by Hieronymus Bosch Scala/Art Resource, New York”; “Works by Andy Goldsworthy, courtesy of Galerie LeLong”; “San Francisco Chronicle Masthead, copyright San Francisco Chronicle”; and, “The Producers gratefully acknowledge the help and support of The San Francisco Film and Video Arts Commission; The California Film Commission.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Nov 1992.
---
Daily Variety
2 Nov 1993.
---
Daily Variety
8 Nov 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1993
p. 5, 13.
Los Angeles Times
15 Oct 1993
Calendar, p. 4.
New York Times
15 Oct 1993
Section C, p. 12.
Publishers Weekly
24 Aug 1992.
---
Screen International
24 Jul 1992.
---
Variety
18 Oct 1993
p. 49.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Warner Bros. Presents
A Spring Creek Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
2d unit dir
2d unit 1st asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
Scr
Based upon his novel
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Chief lighting tech
Key grip
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Standby painter
Still photog
Aerial photog
2d unit dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Illustrator
Art dept coord
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed, Australian post prod unit
Asst film ed, Australian post prod unit
Asst film ed, Australian post prod unit
Asst film ed, Australian post prod unit
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dec
Lead, San Francisco
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Asst prop master
Greensman
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman, San Francisco
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Costumer
MUSIC
Orig mus comp and cond by
Mus ed
Mus rec and mixed by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cable person
Sd des, Australian post prod unit
ADR ed, Australian post prod unit
Dial ed, Australian post prod unit
Dial ed, Australian post prod unit
Dial ed, Australian post prod unit
Sd eff ed, Australian post prod unit
Sd eff ed, Australian post prod unit
Asst eff ed, Australian post prod unit
Asst eff ed, Australian post prod unit
Asst dial eff, Australian post prod unit
Asst dial ed, Australian post prod unit
Re-rec mixer, Australian post prod unit
Foley rec, Australian post prod unit
Foley artist, Australian post prod unit
Post prod supv, Australian post prod unit
Post prod facilities, Australian post prod unit
Sydney
Re-rec facilities, Australian post prod unit
Sydney
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec visual eff by
Visual eff supv
Introvision prod
Introvision prod
Introvision tech supv
Introvision art dept
Introvision cam
Title des by
Process compositing by
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter pilot
Spec des consultant
Loc mgr, Los Angeles
Loc mgr, San Francisco
Prod accountant
Scr supv
Prod assoc
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Extras casting, San Francisco & Bakersfield
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation co-capt
Asst prod accountant
Casting assoc
Asst to Ms. Weinstein
Asst to Ms. Weinstein
Asst to Ms. Forman & Mr. Beasley
Asst to Mr. Weir
Asst to Mr. Bridges
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Staff asst
Diaster/Rescue consultant
San Francisco Police liaison
Legal adv
Adv
Craft service
Catering by
First aid
Digital film services provided by
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Fearless by Rafael Yglesias (New York, 1993).
SONGS
"Lento Sostenuto Tranquillo Ma Cantabile" From Symphony No. 3 ("Symphony Of Sorrowful Songs"), written by Henryk Mikoł
aj Górecki, David Zinman, conductor, Dawn Upshaw, soprano, performed by London Sinfonietta, courtesy of Elektra Nonesuch, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Mai Nozipo," written by Dumisani Maraire, performed by Kronos Quartet with Dumisani Maraire: Ngoma, Hosho, courtesy of Elektra Nonesuch, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
+
SONGS
"Lento Sostenuto Tranquillo Ma Cantabile" From Symphony No. 3 ("Symphony Of Sorrowful Songs"), written by Henryk Mikoł
aj Górecki, David Zinman, conductor, Dawn Upshaw, soprano, performed by London Sinfonietta, courtesy of Elektra Nonesuch, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Mai Nozipo," written by Dumisani Maraire, performed by Kronos Quartet with Dumisani Maraire: Ngoma, Hosho, courtesy of Elektra Nonesuch, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Concerto No. 5 In E Flat For Piano And Orchestra," written by Ludwig van Beethoven, performed by Vladimir Ashkenazy and The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Zubin Meta, courtesy of Decca/London Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Markets
"Where The Streets Have No Name," written by Adam Clayton, Paul David Hewson, Laurence Mullen and David Evans, performed by U2, courtesy of Island Records Ltd.
"Sin Ella," written by Gipsy Kings, performed by Gipsy Kings, courtesy of Elektra Entertainment and Sony Music
"Christmas Festival," arranged by Leroy Anderson
"Polymorphia," written by Krzysztof Penderecki
"Jo's Song," written by Josephine Hinds.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Joyride
Joy Ride
Release Date:
15 October 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 October 1993
Production Date:
began 24 August 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP
Copyright Date:
10 December 1993
Copyright Number:
PA675675
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras and Lenses
Duration(in mins):
120
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32562
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Somewhere outside Bakersfield, California, a commercial airliner headed to Houston, Texas, crashes in a cornfield due to hydraulic failure. Survivor Max Klein, an architect, emerges from the wreckage and helps reunite a frantic mother and her infant son. Seemingly unaffected, Max dodges paramedics and sneaks away from the crash site with only minor scrapes. After spending the night in a nearby hotel, he rents a car and drives to Los Angeles to pay a surprise visit to his former high school girl friend, Alison, who he has not seen in twenty years. Over breakfast, he orders a bowl of fresh strawberries. Alison reminds him that he is severely allergic, but Max dismisses her concern and eats the fruit without suffering any side effects. FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) agents eventually track Max down and ask why he left the crash site without contacting his family, while a representative from the airline offers him complimentary train tickets back home to San Francisco. Despite his previous fear of flying and the trauma of the recent incident, he requests a plane ticket. In addition, the airline assigns him to the care of Dr. Bill Perlman, a psychiatrist who specializes in post-traumatic stress disorder. Dr. Perlman quickly concludes that Max is not of sound mind, and Max’s wife, Laura, is disturbed by his distant behavior. Upon returning home, Max is sent to speak with Norma Gordon, the widow of his best friend and business partner, Jeff, who was decapitated in the crash. Although he loved his friend, he speaks bluntly about his death, which upsets Nan further. A young boy from the plane named Byron Hummel publicly exposes Max as a “Good Samaritan” ... +


Somewhere outside Bakersfield, California, a commercial airliner headed to Houston, Texas, crashes in a cornfield due to hydraulic failure. Survivor Max Klein, an architect, emerges from the wreckage and helps reunite a frantic mother and her infant son. Seemingly unaffected, Max dodges paramedics and sneaks away from the crash site with only minor scrapes. After spending the night in a nearby hotel, he rents a car and drives to Los Angeles to pay a surprise visit to his former high school girl friend, Alison, who he has not seen in twenty years. Over breakfast, he orders a bowl of fresh strawberries. Alison reminds him that he is severely allergic, but Max dismisses her concern and eats the fruit without suffering any side effects. FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) agents eventually track Max down and ask why he left the crash site without contacting his family, while a representative from the airline offers him complimentary train tickets back home to San Francisco. Despite his previous fear of flying and the trauma of the recent incident, he requests a plane ticket. In addition, the airline assigns him to the care of Dr. Bill Perlman, a psychiatrist who specializes in post-traumatic stress disorder. Dr. Perlman quickly concludes that Max is not of sound mind, and Max’s wife, Laura, is disturbed by his distant behavior. Upon returning home, Max is sent to speak with Norma Gordon, the widow of his best friend and business partner, Jeff, who was decapitated in the crash. Although he loved his friend, he speaks bluntly about his death, which upsets Nan further. A young boy from the plane named Byron Hummel publicly exposes Max as a “Good Samaritan” for providing him comfort. Max flees to avoid the attention of the media, fearlessly walking through heavy traffic. Three months later, Max has embraced his near-death experience and considers it to be the best thing that has ever happened to him. At Dr. Perlman’s recommendation, he connects with Carla Rodrigo, the mother whose infant he rescued, but learns that the child died shortly after the crash. Plagued with guilt for failing to save her son, Carla has not left her room and refuses to speak to anyone about the accident. Max encourages her to attend church with him, and they develop a deep bond as he helps her return to a normal life. Laura worries that they have fallen in love, and Dr. Perlman observes that Max has become delusional in his efforts to “save” Carla because he has “beaten death.” Later, Carla attends a support group with the other survivors, but lashes out at the flight attendant who tried to help her baby during the crash. Meanwhile, Max’s lawyer, Steven Brillstein, attempts to get Max to fabricate the gruesome details of Jeff Gordon’s death to increase Nan’s compensation from the airline. Affected by the stress of lying, Jeff runs to the roof of the building and suffers an anxiety attack. To overcome his breakdown, he teeters dangerously on the ledge, testing the limits of his fear until he is confident that he will not fall. Laura watches from the doorway and tries to offer emotional support, but Max insists she cannot possibly understand him. During Thanksgiving dinner, Max scolds his son, Jonah, for prematurely excusing himself from the table to play video games. An argument ensues between Max and Laura, and Max declares that he does not care if their marriage is failing. As Christmas approaches, Max and Carla spend a day at a shopping mall, buying presents to honor the memory of their dead loved ones. In the parking lot, Carla admits that she let go of her child during the crash, and bursts into hysterical sobs. Determined to prove she was not at fault, Max straps her into the back seat of his car and instructs her to hold onto a toolbox, pretending it is her baby, as he drives headlong into a wall. When they make impact, the toolbox flies out of her hands and through the windshield, and Carla and Max are hospitalized. The experience is a breakthrough for Carla, who finally realizes there was nothing she could have done to save her son. While Max recovers in the intensive care unit, Carla tells Laura that she loves Max and thinks of him as her personal “angel.” Laura rejects this, reminding her that Max is just a man who is now failing in his responsibilities as a father and a husband. Realizing that Max has done all he can to help her, Carla reluctantly ends their relationship so he can take care of himself. Upon his release from the hospital, however, Max still struggles to connect with Laura and Jonah. Steven Brillstein eventually reaches a satisfactory settlement with the airline and arrives at the Klein household with a celebratory gift that contains a carton of fresh strawberries. Max eats one, but this time suffers an extreme allergic reaction and falls to the ground. As he chokes, he remembers his final moments on the plane, including his decision to leave his seat next to Jeff to sit with Byron, who was traveling alone. He recalls the faces of the other passengers, and relives the violent trauma of the crash. Although Laura performs mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, Max’s heart stops, and he imagines himself in the plane’s ruined fuselage, walking toward a blinding white light. Suddenly, Max revives, clutching at Laura and gasping, “I’m alive!” Relieved, they erupt into a fit of laughter and collapse on the floor in each other’s arms. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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