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HISTORY

The film opens with sketch illustrations depicting the ending of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1938, see entry). The images are accompanied by voice-over narration of Dom DeLuise as the “Looking Glass”: “We all know the story of a maid named Snow White and how the good Dwarfs tried to hide her from sight. And who could forget how that wicked queen—the creep—gave Snow White the apple to cause eternal sleep. Poison is strong, but love stronger still. One day came a prince riding over the hill. With love in his heart, he reached out his hand. His touch woke Snow White and brought joy to the land. What follows now? A wedding! Well then, let all the Dwarfs be our seven best men! Good! Look! They rode into the sunset and through green clover. But that isn’t the end. No! Our story’s not over. So for those of you who feel perplexed and want to know what happens next, we are proud to present, for your fun and delight, the continuing story of the Prince and Snow White.”
       On 4 Aug 1986, People magazine reported that Joni Mitchell was cast to voice “Mother Nature” in an animated project for Filmation, which a 24 May 1993 DV article called an “unauthorized sequel” to Walt Disney Productions Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. A few days later, however, the 15 Aug 1986 HR announced Mitchell’s replacement by Phyllis Diller, and referred to the film by the working title, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfelles. Various Var items in fall 1987 suggested that the film was ... More Less

The film opens with sketch illustrations depicting the ending of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1938, see entry). The images are accompanied by voice-over narration of Dom DeLuise as the “Looking Glass”: “We all know the story of a maid named Snow White and how the good Dwarfs tried to hide her from sight. And who could forget how that wicked queen—the creep—gave Snow White the apple to cause eternal sleep. Poison is strong, but love stronger still. One day came a prince riding over the hill. With love in his heart, he reached out his hand. His touch woke Snow White and brought joy to the land. What follows now? A wedding! Well then, let all the Dwarfs be our seven best men! Good! Look! They rode into the sunset and through green clover. But that isn’t the end. No! Our story’s not over. So for those of you who feel perplexed and want to know what happens next, we are proud to present, for your fun and delight, the continuing story of the Prince and Snow White.”
       On 4 Aug 1986, People magazine reported that Joni Mitchell was cast to voice “Mother Nature” in an animated project for Filmation, which a 24 May 1993 DV article called an “unauthorized sequel” to Walt Disney Productions Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. A few days later, however, the 15 Aug 1986 HR announced Mitchell’s replacement by Phyllis Diller, and referred to the film by the working title, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfelles. Various Var items in fall 1987 suggested that the film was later renamed Snow White: The Adventure Continues.
       According to a 17 May 1993 LAT article, production was completed in 1988. Around this time, Disney sued Filmation, but was assured that the characters would not resemble those in Disney’s 1938 original.
       The 7 Feb 1989 DV stated that French cosmetics corporation L’Oreal created Paravision International, an entertainment branch intended to expand the company’s involvement in the film and television market. Paravision purchased rights to the Filmation library, and Filmation closed its production office in Reseda, CA.
       Items in the 9 Apr 1990 DV and 18 Apr 1990 Var suggested the involvement of Kel-Air Entertainment, but the company is not credited onscreen. The 24 May 1993 DV reported that the film was first reviewed by Var in Jun 1990 as “well-crafted but uninspired,” and an advertisement in AMPAS library files indicated the newest working title as Snow White in the Land of Doom.
       Following the dissolution of Filmation, the 11 Jun and 20 Jul 1993 HR announced that Texas-based 1st National Film Corp. purchased theatrical distribution rights for $1.3—$1.5 million. The 19 Nov 1990 Var claimed that funds were raised through a “stock swap,” which gave shareholders a stake in 1st National’s parent company, Power Capital. However, the already delayed 16 Jun 1990 release was once again postponed due to “lack of capital,” as 1st National attempted to entice merchandisers with rights to products such as a Nintendo video game, dolls, toys, comic books, and apparel. A 19 Sep 1991 DV news item stated that 1st National also acquired television distribution rights, which included a $7.3 million “minimum performance guarantee” and $17 million in projected sales.
       On 10 Mar 1993, HR announced that Continental Capital & Equity Corp. had replaced GICC Capital Corp. as a backer of the theatrical release, and would provide $6 million for prints and advertising costs. The 26 Apr 1993 Var stated that 1st National hoped to release the film on 1,200 screens, but so far had only booked commitments from 400 theaters. The 24 May 1993 DV stated that a total of $7.4 million was spent on promotional efforts, which included trailers and television advertisements. The article proposed that the delayed opening would help the company “cash in” on the recent success of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast (1991, see entry) and Aladdin (1992, see entry), as well as the studio’s upcoming re-release of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs on 2 Jul 1993.
       According to the 2 Jun 1993 DV, the film received negative reviews and grossed only $1.8 million during its opening weekend, causing 1st National’s stock to drop thirty-six percent. After ten days, the film earned $2.8 million, which the 11 Jun 1993 HR stated was cause for “substantial doubt” about 1st National’s future after the company estimated a figure closer to $15 million, which would recoup the film’s total production and advertising costs. By the following month, the 20 Jul 1993 HR listed cumulative earnings of $3.2 million. As a result, 1st National sold home video distribution rights to Spelling Entertainment Group’s Worldvision Enterprises Inc., with videocassette release scheduled for the 1993 holiday season. Due to fees and marketing costs, however, Worldvision was not expected to earn more than a few million dollars in revenue.
       In light of the film’s underwhelming box-office performance, the Securities & Exchange Commission filed a complaint against 1st National for knowingly “defrauding” investors by “inflating” the picture’s potential. Despite Disney’s lack of involvement, 1st National wrote letters to potential investors purporting the film’s status as a sequel that was projected to gross at least $122 million in theatrical and home video sales. The 29 Jun 1995 DV stated that the complaint was settled out of court.
       Although the original Nintendo video game was never released, Imagitec Design developed a version of the game for Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1994. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
7 Feb 1989.
---
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1989.
---
Daily Variety
9 Apr 1990.
---
Daily Variety
2 Nov 1990.
---
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1991.
---
Daily Variety
24 May 1993
p. 61.
Daily Variety
2 Jun 1993.
---
Daily Variety
29 Jun 1995.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 1993
p. 10, 14.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jun 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1993
p. 8, 77.
Los Angeles Times
17 May 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 May 1993
Calendar, p. 12.
New York Times
29 May 1993
Section I, p. 13.
People
4 Aug 1986.
---
Variety
21 Oct 1987.
---
Variety
18 Apr 1990.
---
Variety
19 Nov 1990.
---
Variety
26 Apr 1993.
---
Variety
29 May 1993
p. 9.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
As Scowl
As Snow White
As The Looking Glass
As Mother Nature
As Blossom
As Critterina and Marina
As Sunflower
As The Prince
+

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
As Scowl
As Snow White
As The Looking Glass
As Mother Nature
As Blossom
As Critterina and Marina
As Sunflower
As The Prince
As Lord Maliss
As Moonbeam and Thunderella
As Batso
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
1st National Film Corp. Release
A Milton Verret Presentation
Filmation Presents
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Supv dir
Prod mgr
Prod mgr
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Prod des
Prod des
Prod des
Prod des
Prod des
Prod des
Prod des
Prod des
Prod des
Graphic des
Model des
Model des
Model des
Model des
Model des
Model des
Storyboard supv
Storyboard supv
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst film ed
MUSIC
Mus comp and performed by
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd rec
Sd rec
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Re-rec mixing by
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff anim supv
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Spec eff anim
Asst spec eff anim
Asst spec eff anim
Asst spec eff anim
Asst spec eff anim
Head of spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to the prod
Vice president in charge of prod
Prod coord
Prod coord
Casting
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Film coord
Film coord
Film and video distributor coord
Prod comptroller
Asst prod comptroller
ANIMATION
Seq dir
Seq dir
Seq dir
Layout supv
Layout supv
Asst layout supv
Asst layout
Anim eff breakdown
Anim eff breakdown
Dir of col
Background supv
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background painter
Background des
Background des
Background des
Background des asst
Background des asst
Background des asst
Background des asst
Asst anim supv
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Key asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Asst anim
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Anim breakdown
Inbetweener
Inbetweener
Inbetweener
Inbetweener
Darkroom
Darkroom
Darkroom
Asst anim prod asst
Anim checking supv
Asst supv anim checking
Anim checking
Anim checking
Xerox supv
Xerox dept asst supv
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox processor
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Xerox checker
Ink and paint supv
Head of mark-up
Mark-up asst
Mark-up
Mark-up
Mark-up
Mark-up
Mark-up
Mark-up
Mark-up
Head of airbrush eff
Airbrush eff
Airbrush eff
Airbrush eff
Airbrush eff
Airbrush eff
Head of final checking
Final checking
Final checking
Ink and paint repairs
Ink and paint repairs
Ink and paint repairs
Head of paint lab
Paint lab asst
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Painter
Ink and paint prod asst
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Love Is The Reason," music and lyrics by John Lewis Parker, performed by Irene Cara
"Thunderella's Song," music by Richard Kerr, lyrics by Stephanie Tyrell
"Mother Nature's Song," music by Barry Mann, lyrics by Stephanie Tyrell, performed by Phyllis Diller
+
SONGS
"Love Is The Reason," music and lyrics by John Lewis Parker, performed by Irene Cara
"Thunderella's Song," music by Richard Kerr, lyrics by Stephanie Tyrell
"Mother Nature's Song," music by Barry Mann, lyrics by Stephanie Tyrell, performed by Phyllis Diller
"The Baddest," music by Ashley Hall, lyrics by Stephanie Tyrell, performed by Edward Asner.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfelles
Snow White in the Land of Doom
Snow White: The Adventure Continues
Release Date:
28 May 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 28 May 1993
Production Date:
completed 1988
Copyright Claimant:
1st National Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
25 May 1990
Copyright Number:
PAu001373993
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Animation
Duration(in mins):
74, 80 or 84
MPAA Rating:
G
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Shortly after the death of the wicked queen, peace returns to the kingdom and Snow White prepares to wed the Prince who saved her life. One day, the queen’s wizard brother, Lord Maliss, storms into the castle and demands to know his sister’s whereabouts. When the queen’s talking looking glass reveals that her jealousy of Snow White led to her demise, Lord Maliss vows to avenge her death by taking control of the land, which he dubs the “Realm of Doom.” He transforms himself into a dragon and flies away, followed by the queen’s supporters, a cigar-smoking owl named Scowl, and an innocent bat named Batso. Lord Maliss finds Snow White picking flowers on the way to the cottage owned by the Seven Dwarfs. He snatches her in his talons, but Scowl inadvertently gets in the way, causing the dragon to drop her in the forest. When the Prince challenges Snow White’s attacker, Lord Maliss returns to human form and uses magic to knock him unconscious. In her attempt to escape, Snow White becomes lost in the woods, but eventually locates the Dwarfs’ cottage. She faints from exhaustion just outside the door and awakens several hours later inside the house, which she realizes is empty. After exploring the property, she meets the Dwarfs’ female cousins, the Seven “Dwarfelles,” who took over the cottage after the Dwarfs moved away. Snow White explains her problem, and the Dwarfelles take her to Rainbow Falls to see Mother Nature. While each of the Dwarfelles—Muddy, Critterina, Blossom, Marina, Sunburn, and Moonbeam—control different elements of the natural world, the young Thunderella laments her failure to develop her power to command the weather. Mother Nature criticizes ... +


Shortly after the death of the wicked queen, peace returns to the kingdom and Snow White prepares to wed the Prince who saved her life. One day, the queen’s wizard brother, Lord Maliss, storms into the castle and demands to know his sister’s whereabouts. When the queen’s talking looking glass reveals that her jealousy of Snow White led to her demise, Lord Maliss vows to avenge her death by taking control of the land, which he dubs the “Realm of Doom.” He transforms himself into a dragon and flies away, followed by the queen’s supporters, a cigar-smoking owl named Scowl, and an innocent bat named Batso. Lord Maliss finds Snow White picking flowers on the way to the cottage owned by the Seven Dwarfs. He snatches her in his talons, but Scowl inadvertently gets in the way, causing the dragon to drop her in the forest. When the Prince challenges Snow White’s attacker, Lord Maliss returns to human form and uses magic to knock him unconscious. In her attempt to escape, Snow White becomes lost in the woods, but eventually locates the Dwarfs’ cottage. She faints from exhaustion just outside the door and awakens several hours later inside the house, which she realizes is empty. After exploring the property, she meets the Dwarfs’ female cousins, the Seven “Dwarfelles,” who took over the cottage after the Dwarfs moved away. Snow White explains her problem, and the Dwarfelles take her to Rainbow Falls to see Mother Nature. While each of the Dwarfelles—Muddy, Critterina, Blossom, Marina, Sunburn, and Moonbeam—control different elements of the natural world, the young Thunderella laments her failure to develop her power to command the weather. Mother Nature criticizes her incompetence, and ridicules the other Dwarfelles for misusing the powers she gave them. Although Snow White argues in their favor, Mother Nature decides to strip the Dwarfelles of their magical abilities. Moments later, Lord Maliss attacks in his dragon form, but Mother Nature protects them. Before he flies away, however, Maliss announces that the Prince is being held captive in the Realm of Doom. Giving the Dwarfelles one last chance to prove their worth, Mother Nature assigns them to accompany Snow White across the kingdom and save her beloved. On their journey, the group realizes they are being followed by a cloaked traveler, whom they call the “Shadow Man.” Watching their progress through the looking glass, Lord Maliss sends a pack of vicious horned dogs, which chase the Dwarfelles to the edge of a ravine. From the other side of the chasm, the Shadow Man knocks over a tree, creating a bridge for them to cross. Snow White thanks their savior for his help, but the Shadow Man runs away in shame after seeing his reflection in a puddle of water. Moments later, Lord Maliss appears, transforms into a dragon, and kidnaps Snow White once again. Back at the castle, Scowl and Batso decide to flee the realm to avoid Lord Maliss’s wrath, but notice the Dwarfelles assembled at the gate. Although Scowl hopes to win Lord Maliss’ approval by turning them in, the Dwarfelles easily escape the bird’s clutches. Inside, Lord Maliss disguises himself as the Prince and drags Snow White to a stone plinth, where he intends to turn her into a statue using his magic cape. The Shadow Man intervenes, but the evil wizard kills him. The Dwarfelles arrive, and Lord Maliss petrifies all except Thunderella, who finally summons powers enough to shock him with bolts of lightning. As he attempts to morph into a dragon, Snow White covers him with the cape, causing his body to solidify midway through the transformation. Snow White cries over the corpse of the Shadow Man, and her tears revive him. He sheds his cloak and reveals himself as the Prince, now freed from Lord Maliss’ crippling curse. Mother Nature grants the Dwarfelles permission to keep their powers, and proclaims that Scowl and Batso will train as their new apprentices. After inviting the Dwarfelles to their wedding, the Prince and Snow White kiss, looking forward to living happily ever after. +

GENRE
Sub-genre:
Animation, with songs


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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