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HISTORY

       Producers Donovan Leitch and Josh Richman told the Aug 1992 Village Voice they were inspired by friend and actor Sean Penn to make The Last Party: “It’s an attempt to raise voter awareness among young Americans, a hip and cool alternative to typical network programming.” They established an office in New York City and began shooting on Super-16mm film. Principal photography began in New York City on 15 Jun 1992, according to the 14 Jul 1992 HR and 24 Jul 1992 DV. The centerpieces for the film were the Democratic National Convention, held at New York’s Madison Square Garden on 13 – 16 Jul 1992, and the Republican National Convention, held at the Astrodome in Houston, TX, on 17 – 20 Aug 1992. An early alternate title for the film was Youth for Truth, the 14 Jul 1992 DV noted. According to the 18 Jun 1993 HR, the film’s $800,000 budget was financed exclusively by biotechnology entrepreneur Samuel D. Waksal, who is credited as an executive producer.
       The 15 Sep 1992 DV reported that the producers had already shot ninety percent of their documentary and planned to finish by accompanying the Bill Clinton campaign and wrapping production in the candidate’s home town, Little Rock, AR, on 3 Nov 1992. However, the trip to Little Rock was not included in the film. Donovan Leitch hoped to have the movie in theaters by Jan 1993, in time for the U.S. presidential inauguration day, and to sell edited thirty- to sixty-minute versions to television cable channels HBO and MTV, but ultimately the film was released ... More Less

       Producers Donovan Leitch and Josh Richman told the Aug 1992 Village Voice they were inspired by friend and actor Sean Penn to make The Last Party: “It’s an attempt to raise voter awareness among young Americans, a hip and cool alternative to typical network programming.” They established an office in New York City and began shooting on Super-16mm film. Principal photography began in New York City on 15 Jun 1992, according to the 14 Jul 1992 HR and 24 Jul 1992 DV. The centerpieces for the film were the Democratic National Convention, held at New York’s Madison Square Garden on 13 – 16 Jul 1992, and the Republican National Convention, held at the Astrodome in Houston, TX, on 17 – 20 Aug 1992. An early alternate title for the film was Youth for Truth, the 14 Jul 1992 DV noted. According to the 18 Jun 1993 HR, the film’s $800,000 budget was financed exclusively by biotechnology entrepreneur Samuel D. Waksal, who is credited as an executive producer.
       The 15 Sep 1992 DV reported that the producers had already shot ninety percent of their documentary and planned to finish by accompanying the Bill Clinton campaign and wrapping production in the candidate’s home town, Little Rock, AR, on 3 Nov 1992. However, the trip to Little Rock was not included in the film. Donovan Leitch hoped to have the movie in theaters by Jan 1993, in time for the U.S. presidential inauguration day, and to sell edited thirty- to sixty-minute versions to television cable channels HBO and MTV, but ultimately the film was released long after the inauguration. The producers also planned a music video, starring the Beastie Boys and Cypress Hill, and using scenes from the documentary, which they hoped would air on MTV in the last weeks of Oct 1992, just before the presidential election. Josh Richman told the 12 Jul 1992 LAT he hoped to include in the film concert footage of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and rapper Ice Cube from the Lollapalooza II concert tour, as well as an interview with New York City Mayor David Dinkins. However, the Lollapalooza footage and Dinkins interview did not appear in the final film.
       TThe 18 Jun 1993 HR reported that producers were unable to find a theatrical distributor until Triton Pictures agreed to release The Last Party in Aug 1993, seven months after Bill Clinton was sworn in as U.S. President. Greeted by mixed reviews, the film opened in New York City in one theater and made only $5,000, the 30 Aug 1993 DV noted, followed by a 10 Sep 1993 opening in one Los Angeles, CA, theater that garnered only $1,551 on its opening weekend, according to the 14 Sep 1993 DV. .
       End credits contain the following acknowledgments: “Thanks to Arthur Altschul, Jr.; Kim Alfano; Ken Anderson; Joe Bacon; Steve Barr; Elisabeth Benjamin; Natasha Benjamin; Clyde Blake; Noah Bogen; Ellin Burke; Adam Cahan; Richard Chacon; Mack Cole-Edelsack; Mario Cooper; Ronnie Dashev; Earl Davis; Mike Diamond; Casey DiFranco; Dana Drockman; Chris Drury; Dennis Dunbar; Don Epstein; Ted Gault; David Giffen; Michael Gordon; Richard Graddis; Rhoda N. Greenberg; Kevin Groome; Kim Harris; Adam Horovitz; Rachel Horovitz; Macammah Jacobovitz; Matt Jacobs; Karis Jagger; Chris Jansing; Dennis Jarvis; Milica Kastner; Kevin Kaufman; Jaynee Keyes; Dora Kovanza; Rick Krim; Lord Sri Krsna; Neel Lattimore; Patrick Lippert; Amy Lumet; Beverly Lund; Bruce Lynn; Darcy Marano; Dawn Martin; David Martin; Morgan Mason; Joe Mauceri; Traci McCarty; Otis McClay; Alan Miller; Michael Minns; Joe Monge; Micah Morrison; Muggs; Dee Dee Myers; Stephen Nagin; David Northrup; Guy Oseary; Erin O’Brien; George Pappas; Andrea Perlbinder; Phyllis Pollack; Elisa Price; Matthew Price; Susan Pyser; Barry Rebo; Bonnie Reiss; Heather Rem; Chantal Ribiero; Heidi Richman; Linda Ricks; Elizabeth Rogers; Jeff Rose; Mike Rothmiller; Danny Saber; Enid Sages; Paul Schaap; Peter Scher; Stephanie Scott; Tom Senning; John Silva; Richard Skeete; Ione Skye; Susanne Soderberg; Tim Spitzer; Josh Stein; Nina Streich; Bela Stulberger; Dave Surilnik; Adam Taylor; Tania Van Den Houten; Siri Von Reis; Debra Wakefield; Elana Waksal; Happy Walters; Irwin Young; Linda Young; Bob Zahn; Greg Zilboorg; Ruthie Zilboorg; Scott Zimmerman; Ethan Zindler.” Also, thanks are given to: “ACT-UP; Avid Technology, Inc.; Christian Coalition; Creative Coalition; College Democrats of America; Democratic National Committee; Gay Men’s Health Crisis; Greater Talent Agency; Houston Film Commission; New York Mercantile Exchange; New York City Mayor’s Office for Film and Television; Our Inner Children; Perot for President; Planet Hollywood; Planned Parenthood; Quicksilver Wetsuits; Republican National Committee; Reebok; RMZ Communications; Rock the Vote; Scholastic Kids Caucus; Southwest Equestrian Center; Spyder Surfboards; Teen Canteen; Trans American Video Services; Videomakers; Wilson Sporting Goods; Wireless Data Systems; Women’s Action Coalition; Young College Republicans.”

      The end credits contain a postscript: “After the election Mike Evans worked as a volunteer in The White House. He was later fired for allegedly selling counterfeit inaugural invitations.” Several principals are identified in captions throughout the film: “Patti Davis”; “Curtis Sliwa”; “Spike Lee”; “Jerry Brown”; “Joey DiPaolo Aids Activist”; “Roger Clinton”; AZ Rapper – Mob Style”; “Rev. Al Sharpton”; “Dave Mustaine Megadeth”; “Richard Lewis”; “Mike Evans DNC Volunteer”; “B-Real Rapper – Cypress Hill”; “G. Gordon Liddy”; ”Sean Penn”; “Mike Ruppert Former L.A.P.D. Narcotics”; “Sen. John Kerry (D) Massachusetts”; “Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R) California”; “Rev. Jerry Falwell”; “Mary Stuart Masterson”; “Oliver North”; “Willie D.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Sun-Times
10 Dec 1993
Features, p. 43.
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1992
p. 4.
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1992
p. 13.
Daily Variety
15 Sep 1992
p. 19.
Daily Variety
30 Aug 1993
p. 8.
Daily Variety
30 Aug 1993
p. 35.
Daily Variety
14 Sep 1993
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 1993
p. 3, 52.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Sep 1993
p. 6, 14.
Los Angeles Times
12 Jul 1992
Calendar, p. 26.
Los Angeles Times
10 Sep 1993
Calendar, p. 11.
New York Times
27 Aug 1993
p. 14.
Newsday (Long Island, NY)
27 Aug 1993
p. 71.
Variety
13 Sep 1993
p. 33.
Village Voice
Aug 1992
p. 62.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
Campaign Films Inc and The Athena Group Inc Present
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCERS
Prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
2d unit photog
Asst cam
Asst cam
Asst cam
Gaffer/Grip
Gaffer/Grip
Gaffer/Grip
Black and white
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
Asst ed
Negative matching
Negative matching, Immaculate Matching
MUSIC
Mus supv
SOUND
Sd ed
Sd mixer
Mixing facility
Mixing facility, Sync Sound
VISUAL EFFECTS
Main title des
Computer titles
Computer titles, DuArt Film Laboratories
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Office prod mgr
Field coord
Field coord
Driver
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod lawyer, Codikow & Carroll
Prod lawyer
News coord
Consultant
Super 8 transfers
Super 8 blowup
Super 8 blowup, Interformat
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by, DuArt Film Laboratories
SOURCES
SONGS
"Lighten Up," written by Adam Horovitz, Adam Yauch, Michael Diamond, Mark Nishita, performed by the Beastie Boys, published by PolyGram International Publishing, Inc. and Brooklyn Dust Music, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Give My Regards To Broadway," written by George M. Cohan, performed by Documentary Recordings, published by Hudson Bay Music Publishing, courtesy of Documentary Recordings
'Yodeling Mazurka," written by A. Runggaldier, performed by Rich Man Stuffs His Pants, published by Alpha Music/BMI, courtesy of Corelli/Jacobs Recording, Inc.
+
SONGS
"Lighten Up," written by Adam Horovitz, Adam Yauch, Michael Diamond, Mark Nishita, performed by the Beastie Boys, published by PolyGram International Publishing, Inc. and Brooklyn Dust Music, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Give My Regards To Broadway," written by George M. Cohan, performed by Documentary Recordings, published by Hudson Bay Music Publishing, courtesy of Documentary Recordings
'Yodeling Mazurka," written by A. Runggaldier, performed by Rich Man Stuffs His Pants, published by Alpha Music/BMI, courtesy of Corelli/Jacobs Recording, Inc.
"Jimmy James," written by Adam Horovitz, Adam Yauch, Michael Diamond, Mario Caldato, performed by the Beastie Boys, published by PolyGram International Publishing, Inc. and Brooklyn Dust Music, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Intoxication," written and performed by Robert Aaron, published by AZ's Favorite Music Publishing, courtesy of 8 Ball Records
"Shakey Ground," written by Jeffrey Bowen, Eddie Hazel, Al Boyd, performed by Roger Clinton, published by Jobete Music Co., Inc. and Stone Diamond Music Corporation
"Jump Around," written by Larry Muggerud, Erik Schrody, performed by House of Pain, published by MCA Music Publishing, a division of MCA, Inc. and T-Boy Music Publishing, Inc. c/o Lipservices, courtesy of Tommy Boy Music, Inc.
"Pass The Mic," written by Adam Horovitz, Adam Yauch, Michael Diamond, Mark Nishita, performed by the Beastie Boys, published by PolyGram International Publishing, Inc. and Brooklyn Dust Music, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Jazz Turbulence," written and performed by Groove Stalkers, published by Groove Stalkers, courtesy of the Shack Recording Studios
"Shadow," written by Daevid Allen & Kramer, performed by Daevid Allen, Kramer & David Licht, published by and courtesy of Shimmy-Disc Music
"Traitor," written and performed by Groove Stalkers, published by Groove Stalkers, courtesy of the Shack Recording Studios
"Tales From The Vienna Woods," written by Johann Strauss, performed by Dr. W. Aksal Rose & The Bouncers, published by Josef Weinberger/ASCAP, courtesy of Corelli/Jacobs Recording, Inc.
"Money In The Depths Of A Plagueless Man," written by Danny Saber, Sean Kennedy, performed by Proper Grounds, published by EMI Blackwood Music/Sean Kennedy Music/One-Eyed Egyptian, BMI, courtesy of Maverick Recording Company, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Don't Stop," written by Christine McVie, performed by Fleetwood Mac, published by Fleetwood Mac Music, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Hole In The Head, written by Larry Muggerud, Louis Freeze, performed by Cypress Hill, published by MCA Music Publishing, a division of MCA, Inc. and Cypress Funky Music and BMG Songs, Inc., courtesy of Ruffhouse Records/Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Thank You Music," written and performed by Kramer, published by Shimmy-Disc Music, courtesy of Shimmy-Disc
"Funky Boss," written by Adam Horovitz, Adam Yauch, Michael Diamond, Mark Nishita, performed by the Beastie Boys, published by PolyGram International Publishing, Inc. and Brooklyn Dust Music, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Summer Time," written by J. Sanders, performed by Johnathon Dana Gladstein, published by DeWolf Music/ASCAP, courtesy of Corelli/Jacobs Recording, Inc.
"Gimme Back My 15 Cents," written and performed by Rebby Sharp, published by Shimmy-Disc Music, courtesy of Shimmy-Disc
"Sizzle," written by R. Tilsley, performed by Goldberg & The Spitjobs, published by DeWolf/ASCAP, courtesy of Corelli/Jacobs Recording, Inc.
"My Girl," written by Smokey Robinson, Ronald White, performed by Papillon, published by Jobete Music Co., Inc.
"Down Our Way," written by Al Stedman, Fred Hughes, performed by The Spatterdashes, published by Shawnee Press, Inc.
"Die," written and performed by Willie D., published by N the Water Publishing, courtesy of Rap-a-Lot Records, Inc.
"I'm Goin' Out Like A Soldier," written and performed by Willie D., published by N the Water Publishing, courtesy of Rap-a-Lot Records, Inc.
"Zasca Coska," written and performed by Ruins, published by Magaibutsu Publishing, courtesy of Shimmy-Disc
"The Eyes Of Texas," written by C. Gross, T. Harrington, performed by Masters of Reality, published by Mudslide Music/ACME Music/Unbeknownst Music (BMI), courtesy of Delicious Vinyl
"Mind Tempest," written by Danny Saber, Sean Kennedy, performed by Proper Grounds, published by EMI Blackwood Music/Sean Kennedy Music/One-Eyed Egyptian, BMI
"You Got It All Wrong," written by P. Mata, performed by Sativa Luvbox, published by BMI/Gasoline Alley Music/Sexy Satellite Music, courtesy of Gasoline Alley/MCA.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Youth For Truth
Release Date:
27 August 1993
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 27 August 1993
Los Angeles opening: 10 September 1993
Production Date:
15 June - 3 November 1992
Copyright Claimant:
JEED, Inc. and Athena Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
10 August 1994
Copyright Number:
PA719693
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Black and White
gauge
Super 16mm
Duration(in mins):
94
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Actor Robert Downey, Jr., admits that he has spent his life seeking money and attention, but not truth. He admires Charlie Chaplin, whom he portrayed in Chaplin, because the comedian-filmmaker was both an entertainer and social critic. Born during the Vietnam War, Downey’s generation entered adulthood at a cynical time, distrusting the U.S. government. Now it is time for young people to correct the mess their parents made. Downey travels to the 1992 Democratic Convention at Madison Square Garden in New York City, where everyone talks about the “youth vote.” He asks candidate Bill Clinton if young people will be addressing the convention. Downey clowns onstage as technicians set up equipment, and does his “goat boy” walk, hopping in a crouch. He knows it looks silly, but he is the goat boy, ready to act foolish. A Tarot-reading friend turns up the “Fool” card and informs him that it represents the “young spirit.” Patti Davis, daughter of President Ronald Reagan, believes American society is similar to a dysfunctional family that refuses to confront its crises. Downey recalls his own family splitting up when he was twelve. His father, filmmaker Robert Downey, Sr., and sister moved to California, while he stayed in New York City with his mother. Downey’s father insists that voting in 1992 is crucial, and is proud that Robert is making a political documentary. Downey awakens in his hotel room and looks through a book of political terms as he sits in front of the television set. At the convention, he interviews Curtis Sliwa, the leader of ... +


Actor Robert Downey, Jr., admits that he has spent his life seeking money and attention, but not truth. He admires Charlie Chaplin, whom he portrayed in Chaplin, because the comedian-filmmaker was both an entertainer and social critic. Born during the Vietnam War, Downey’s generation entered adulthood at a cynical time, distrusting the U.S. government. Now it is time for young people to correct the mess their parents made. Downey travels to the 1992 Democratic Convention at Madison Square Garden in New York City, where everyone talks about the “youth vote.” He asks candidate Bill Clinton if young people will be addressing the convention. Downey clowns onstage as technicians set up equipment, and does his “goat boy” walk, hopping in a crouch. He knows it looks silly, but he is the goat boy, ready to act foolish. A Tarot-reading friend turns up the “Fool” card and informs him that it represents the “young spirit.” Patti Davis, daughter of President Ronald Reagan, believes American society is similar to a dysfunctional family that refuses to confront its crises. Downey recalls his own family splitting up when he was twelve. His father, filmmaker Robert Downey, Sr., and sister moved to California, while he stayed in New York City with his mother. Downey’s father insists that voting in 1992 is crucial, and is proud that Robert is making a political documentary. Downey awakens in his hotel room and looks through a book of political terms as he sits in front of the television set. At the convention, he interviews Curtis Sliwa, the leader of a youth security group called Guardian Angels. Sliwa is not convinced that young Americans’ sudden political involvement is a good thing, because they worship entertainers and superficiality. Downey interviews a couple of exotic dancers at Goldfingers men’s club. Showering nude, Vanessa Warner tells Downey she is a Republican. Outside Madison Square Garden, Downey feels intimidated by the Women’s Action Coalition marching against male supremacy. Former California Governor Jerry Brown, vying for a presidential nomination, says politics is driven by power, money, and glory, but needs a deeper connection to pull people together. African American activist Reverend Al Sharpton leads a chant of “Keep hope alive!” United for AIDS Action activists discuss how public and political apathy have prevented a cure for the disease. Joey DiPaolo, a thirteen-year-old activist who contracted AIDS, addresses a crowd. Inside Madison Square Garden, Roger Clinton, Bill Clinton’s brother, rehearses with a rock ‘n’ roll band, and tells Downey he straightened out his life because he realized he had to change. Outside, marijuana smokers call for legalization. “AZ” from the group Mob Style raps about surviving drugs and crime. Filmmaker Oliver Stone declares that nothing serious will be debated at the convention because corporations own the media, and only a “cataclysmic event” will shake people out of complacency. “AEVON TC5,” a young black man, complains about police harassment, while his friend, “DOZE TC5,” paints graffiti on walls and shows Downey his sketches. Both men say there is little hope for young black people in the poor neighborhoods. As policemen watch, Al Sharpton addresses a crowd and demands that criminal justice for black people be included in Bill Clinton’s agenda. Later, Sharpton and filmmaker Spike Lee watch a videotape of Malcolm X, discussing how racism is tied inextricably with economics. A homeless black man compares the vast difference between having a job and being out of work. Dave Mustaine, singer-guitarist for the heavy metal band Megadeth, believes America has declined. Visiting Wall Street, Downey talks about mercenary behavior with several young brokers at an outdoor restaurant; Steve Badagliacco and Suzanne Soderberg believe that money and greed “make the world go ’round.” Downey swims in a pond in front of the restaurant on a bet, shouting, “Greed is good.” New York Governor Mario Cuomo speaks on television about the failure of Ronald Reagan’s “trickle down” economics. Downey strips down to red underwear, runs through a park, and sits cross-legged as he talks to people about “getting back in touch with who I really am.” A young boy, Pasha Javaheni-Saatchi, tells Downey he looks stupid in his “jockeys.” As Bill Clinton speaks at the convention, Downey wanders backstage looking for a sandwich. Mike Evans, a Democratic National Committee volunteer, believes that Clinton does not have a prayer of being nominated because of his extra-marital affairs. People argue. Downey returns home to his wife, Deborah Falconer, in Los Angeles, California. He claims that as a prosperous married man, he has things to protect now. He practices firing at a gun range, where he meets former gang member “B-Real” from the hip-hop group Cypress Hill. When Downey stops where a rape took place only minutes earlier on Hollywood Boulevard, young street people sit around, complaining they have few shelters and discuss their hard times. For them, the Hollywood dream turned out to be a nightmare. Patti Davis criticizes father Ronald Reagan’s right-wing politics, but radio host and former “Watergate” figure G. Gordon Liddy claims that the U.S. must play “hard ball” because it has many enemies. Actor Sean Penn and other liberal activists, including Mike Ruppert, a former narcotics agent with the Los Angeles Police Department (L.A.P.D.), explain how covert U.S. operations in Central America have affected American cities. Massachusetts Democratic Senator John Kerry admits that the federal government lies. On a Southern California beach in Orange County, Representative Dana Rohrabacher claims U.S. covert actions are necessary because America is “up against bad guys.” Flying to Houston, Texas, in August for the Republican convention at the Astrodome, Downey visits Mike Evans, who is now working for the Republican National Committee. Downey notes that this convention looks more prosperous than the one in New York. Evangelist and Moral Majority leader Reverend Jerry Falwell believes that young people are undergoing a “spiritual awakening” that has energized the Republican party. African American rapper “TRQ,” raised by a father who owned a strip club, is now a Republican who favors abstinence until marriage. At a Republican picnic, several young people inform Downey that the press is liberal, and that the Democrats’ “political correctness” movement is worse than the McCarthyism of the 1950s. Actress Mary Stuart Masterson declares that she is tired of hearing conservatives moralize about abortion while fighting against easily available health care, sex education, and contraception, all of which would reduce abortions. An anti-abortion crowd confronts pro-choice protesters in front of a Planned Parenthood building. Right-wing political adviser and columnist Pat Buchanan speaks at the convention about the war for the soul of America, as Downey does his goat-boy dance around the convention floor. Outside, women protest, and Downey meets Susan Stepanski, a mother ashamed of relying on food stamps to feed her two children because her husband, Steve Stepanski, is unemployed. However, the couple’s next-door neighbors, Brian and Sarah Johnson, left the food stamp program because she and her husband were inspired to improve their lives, and now they feel more optimistic. Conservative operative Oliver North tells Downey that rapper “Ice-T’s” record, “Cop Killer,” puts police at risk and reveals a moral crisis within the entertainment business. Black people, including a Nation of Islam spokesman named Quanell X, carry a coffin and complain that white people ignore the problems of African Americans. Rapper “Wille D.” claims Rodney King, the black man whose videotaped beating by Los Angeles policemen sparked the city’s 1992 riots, is a “sell-out” because he called for peace at a time when African American despair was finally getting attention. Willie D. takes Downey to the run-down Houston neighborhood where whites “allow us to live,” and warns that if African Americans continue to be denied the American dream, they will make certain that white people cannot have it either. President George Bush accepts the nomination to be the Republican candidate for a second term. Downey is most impressed by the urgency of AIDS activists in New York and Texas, because they are literally “dying to tell the truth.” Later, he drives around Hollywood with his father, who thinks Bill Clinton will win the election and do “the right thing” because he idolizes John F. Kennedy. Mike Evans is now working for Bill Clinton’s campaign staff. Wondering if he is ready for the “transformation” that everyone is talking about, Downey votes on election day in November. That night, he watches television with his wife, his father, and his stepmother. Bill Clinton wins the election, and Robert Downey, Sr., announces that it feels like the 1960s again. Walking with his father, Downey does the goat walk. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.