Leprechaun (1993)

R | 92 mins | Horror, Comedy | 8 January 1993

Director:

Mark Jones

Writer:

Mark Jones

Producer:

Jeffrey B. Mallian

Cinematographer:

Levie Isaacks

Production Designer:

Naomi Slodki

Production Company:

Trimark Pictures
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HISTORY

On 19 Nov 1990, Var named Leprechaun as one of four $2—$7 million projects intended to expand Moviestore Entertainment’s efforts in motion picture production. The following year, a 9 Aug 1991 DV news item reported that the property had been acquired by Vidmark Entertainment, a direct-to-video distribution company. Although the 8 Jan 1993 LAT claimed the film only received theatrical bookings after performing well with test audiences, a 25 Aug 2014 EW article clarified that Vidmark had since been “rechristened” as Trimark Pictures to reflect founder Mark Amin’s desire to produce low-budget theatrical features.
       A 15 Oct 1991 HR production chart indicated that filming began 28 Oct 1991 in Los Angeles, CA. The 23 Dec 1991 HR announced the conclusion of principal photography, with release planned for Mar 1992. EW reported a final cost of less than $1 million.
       According to a 30 Apr 1992 DV advertisement, a three-day engagement at the Loek’s Studio 28 Theatre in Grand Rapids, MI, yielded a box-office gross of $12,561. The film also performed well in Baton Rouge, LA, earning $6,682.
       Despite Trimark’s confidence in the picture’s potential, the 8 Jan 1993 HR stated that the 18 Sep 1992 wide release was delayed to avoid competition with several other horror films opening that fall. During this time, Trimark built an extensive $4.5 million advertising campaign, which included promotional tie-ins with Domino’s Pizza, Subway Sandwiches, professional sports teams, and the distribution of a Leprechaun comic book to be handed out at Cineplex Odeon, General Cinema, AMC, Mann, and United ... More Less

On 19 Nov 1990, Var named Leprechaun as one of four $2—$7 million projects intended to expand Moviestore Entertainment’s efforts in motion picture production. The following year, a 9 Aug 1991 DV news item reported that the property had been acquired by Vidmark Entertainment, a direct-to-video distribution company. Although the 8 Jan 1993 LAT claimed the film only received theatrical bookings after performing well with test audiences, a 25 Aug 2014 EW article clarified that Vidmark had since been “rechristened” as Trimark Pictures to reflect founder Mark Amin’s desire to produce low-budget theatrical features.
       A 15 Oct 1991 HR production chart indicated that filming began 28 Oct 1991 in Los Angeles, CA. The 23 Dec 1991 HR announced the conclusion of principal photography, with release planned for Mar 1992. EW reported a final cost of less than $1 million.
       According to a 30 Apr 1992 DV advertisement, a three-day engagement at the Loek’s Studio 28 Theatre in Grand Rapids, MI, yielded a box-office gross of $12,561. The film also performed well in Baton Rouge, LA, earning $6,682.
       Despite Trimark’s confidence in the picture’s potential, the 8 Jan 1993 HR stated that the 18 Sep 1992 wide release was delayed to avoid competition with several other horror films opening that fall. During this time, Trimark built an extensive $4.5 million advertising campaign, which included promotional tie-ins with Domino’s Pizza, Subway Sandwiches, professional sports teams, and the distribution of a Leprechaun comic book to be handed out at Cineplex Odeon, General Cinema, AMC, Mann, and United Artists theater chains.
       Leprechaun was released on videocassette on 28 Apr 1993, just a few months after its theatrical run. A 19 Apr 1993 Var brief noted that it was the first video rental to use an anti-piracy encryption developed by Macrovision.
       Despite largely negative contemporary reviews, Leprechaun has achieved “cult” status among horror film fans, and Warwick Davis reprised his role for five sequels: Leprechaun 2 (1994, see entry); Leprechaun 3 (1995); Leprechaun 4: In Space (1997); Leprechaun: In the Hood (2000); and Leprechaun: Back 2 tha Hood (2003). In 2014, WWE Studios and Lionsgate Films “rebooted” the series with Leprechaun: Origins (see entry).
       End credits state: “The producers wish to thank the following: Creative Entertainment Services; The Coca-Cola Company; Dunn-Edwards Corporation; Sure Grip International; NFL Properties; Ocean Spray; Valencia Studios; Big Sky Ranch; Tapia Park; Galpin Ford; Converse; Reebok; LA Gear; Lee Jeans; Allen and Allen; Justin Boots; Design by Robyn; Virgin Airlines; Valley Hilton; Reel to Reel, Inc.; Saugus Cafe, Saugus, CA; Magic Clippers, Saugus, CA”; and, “Producers special thanks to the following: George Lucas; Vice-President Dan Quayle; Congressman Mel Levine; Elmy Bermejo; June Lockhart; Debra Early; Jim Ball; Nick Thiel; Sammy Montoya; Glen A. Larson; Norm Prescott; Joe Ruby; Cami Winikoff; Jim Keegan; Bruce David Eisen, Esq.; Andrew Hersh; Karen Dare; Jonathon; Ellen Phillips; Diane Hall; Sally Packard; Ann August; Alona Tripet and Uncle Sal.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
9 Aug 1991.
---
Daily Variety
30 Apr 1992.
---
EW
25 Aug 2014.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Dec 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 1993
p. 3, 57.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jan 1993
p. 16, 36.
Los Angeles Times
8 Jan 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
11 Jan 1993
Calendar, p. 3.
New York Times
9 Jan 1993
Section I, p. 17.
Variety
19 Nov 1990.
---
Variety
18 Jan 1993
p. 77.
Variety
19 Apr 1993.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Trimark Pictures Presents
A Mark Jones Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Supv prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Rigging key grip
Rigging crew elec
Rigging crew elec
Generator op
Generator op
Crane op
1st asst cam, Addl photog
2d asst cam, Addl photog
Loader, Addl photog
Gaffer, Addl photog
Best boy rigger, Addl photog
Elec, Addl photog
Elec, Addl photog
Elec, Addl photog
Key grip, Addl photog
Key rigging grip, Addl photog
Best boy grip, Addl photog
Grip, Addl photog
Grip, Addl photog
Grip, Addl photog
Grip, Addl photog
Elec and grip equip
Dollys
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Story board artist
Addl artwork
Addl artwork
Art asst
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
Post prod supv
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Prop master
Scenic dresser
Leadman
Swing man
COSTUMES
Cost des
Key ward
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Post sd supv
Eff des ed
Dial ed
ADR ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Sd asst
Sd asst
Little girls voice
Little boys voice
Sd mixer, Addl photog
Sd asst, Addl photog
Ed facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Sculpture and painting
Mold maker
Mold maker
Fabrication
Animatronics by
Machinist
Opticals and titles
Opt line-up
Opt cam
Opt cam
Spec eff anim
Crew chief
MAKEUP
Leprechaun makeup
Key makeup artist
Asst makeup
Asst makeup
Leprechaun makeup and des
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Exec in charge of prod
Scr supv
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst casting
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Jones
Asst to Mr. Mallian
Asst to Mr. Prescott
Asst to Mr. Price
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Driver
Water truck driver
Honeywagon driver
Honeywagon driver
Shotmaker driver
Catering
Craft service
Craft service
Bug wrangler
First aid
Studio teacher
Travel arrangements
Travel arrangements
Scr supv, Addl photog
Prod asst, Addl photog
Prod asst, Addl photog
Honeywagons
Honeywagons
Helicopter
Pilot
Payroll service
Insurance
Insurance
Completion guaranty provided by
Completion guaranty provided by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
Stunt performer
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
SOURCES
SONGS
"Four Leaf Clover," written by Andrew Keresztes, produced by Kevin Kiner and Andrew Keresztes, publisher Kay & EM Music/BMI.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
8 January 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 8 January 1993
Production Date:
28 October--December 1991
Physical Properties:
Sound
Recorded in Ultra-Stereo®
Color
Lenses
Camera and lenses provided by Panavision
Prints
Filmed on Eastman Color Negative Film
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31759
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After attending his mother’s funeral in his native Ireland, modest farmer Daniel O’Grady returns home to North Dakota in a limousine while guzzling a bottle of expensive whiskey. Calming his wife’s concern about his extravagant spending, O’Grady reveals he acquired a large satchel of gold by following and capturing a leprechaun. Although she dismisses his story as a drunken fable, Mrs. O’Grady later hears a singing, childlike voice emanating from her husband’s suitcase. When a leprechaun emerges, Mrs. O’Grady staggers backward and breaks her neck on the basement stairs. Terrified to see the leprechaun in his home, O’Grady shoots a gun while holding up a four-leaf clover, which weakens the little man’s power. He stuffs the leprechaun into a crate, but suffers a stroke before he can burn it. Ten years later, J. D. Redding rents the O’Grady farmhouse to spend the summer with Tory, his spoiled teenage daughter from Los Angeles, California. Disgusted by the cobwebs and dirt, Tory hurriedly makes arrangements to stay at a nearby hotel, and bumps into Nathan Murphy, a handsome young man who is repainting the house. When Nathan mocks her for leaving, Tory decides to stay, intent to disprove his sexist belief that girls are easily scared. That afternoon, she goes to the basement in hope of finding Nathan and making amends. He startles her, and Tory stumbles against the crate, rousing the leprechaun from its sleep. Intrigued by the box, Nathan suggests they open it, but a yell from his dim-witted friend, Ozzie Jones, distracts them. Upstairs, they discover that Ozzie has dumped a can of blue paint on his head, and he retreats to the bathroom to clean up. While ... +


After attending his mother’s funeral in his native Ireland, modest farmer Daniel O’Grady returns home to North Dakota in a limousine while guzzling a bottle of expensive whiskey. Calming his wife’s concern about his extravagant spending, O’Grady reveals he acquired a large satchel of gold by following and capturing a leprechaun. Although she dismisses his story as a drunken fable, Mrs. O’Grady later hears a singing, childlike voice emanating from her husband’s suitcase. When a leprechaun emerges, Mrs. O’Grady staggers backward and breaks her neck on the basement stairs. Terrified to see the leprechaun in his home, O’Grady shoots a gun while holding up a four-leaf clover, which weakens the little man’s power. He stuffs the leprechaun into a crate, but suffers a stroke before he can burn it. Ten years later, J. D. Redding rents the O’Grady farmhouse to spend the summer with Tory, his spoiled teenage daughter from Los Angeles, California. Disgusted by the cobwebs and dirt, Tory hurriedly makes arrangements to stay at a nearby hotel, and bumps into Nathan Murphy, a handsome young man who is repainting the house. When Nathan mocks her for leaving, Tory decides to stay, intent to disprove his sexist belief that girls are easily scared. That afternoon, she goes to the basement in hope of finding Nathan and making amends. He startles her, and Tory stumbles against the crate, rousing the leprechaun from its sleep. Intrigued by the box, Nathan suggests they open it, but a yell from his dim-witted friend, Ozzie Jones, distracts them. Upstairs, they discover that Ozzie has dumped a can of blue paint on his head, and he retreats to the bathroom to clean up. While drying his hair, Ozzie hears a child’s voice in the basement and unknowingly brushes the four-leaf clover from the top of the crate. The leprechaun bursts free and pounces on Ozzie, demanding to know the whereabouts of his gold. Ozzie scurries upstairs to tell his friends, but they are unable to find evidence of the creature he described. Just then, a rainbow appears in the sky, and Ozzie follows its arc, accompanied by Nathan’s younger brother, Alex. At the end of the rainbow, Ozzie finds a piece of gold and accidentally swallows the coin while biting it to prove its authenticity. Alex discovers a bag containing ninety-nine additional coins, and proposes they save the money for an operation that will “fix” Ozzie’s brain to make him smarter. Meanwhile, outside the house, the leprechaun scratches Tory’s leg and severely bites J. D.’s hand. As Nathan takes them to the hospital, Ozzie and Alex have the coin appraised by a pawnshop owner, who agrees to inspect it further. Once the boys leave, the leprechaun kills the proprietor by jumping on him with a pogo stick. He steals a toy racecar from the shop, but is soon pulled over by a police officer who believes he is a child wearing a mask. The leprechaun maims the officer and steals his gun before chasing him into the forest and breaking his neck. Returning to the house, the leprechaun rummages through the kitchen looking for his remaining gold coins. Tory, Alex, and Ozzie are frightened by the disturbance, but Nathan goes outside to investigate. He gets his leg caught in an animal trap set by the leprechaun, who taunts him and runs away until Nathan fires his shotgun. Ozzie calls the police station, but the officers laugh at his fanciful story and disregard his plea for help. After staunching the blood from Nathan’s wound, Tory gets back in the truck to return to the hospital, but finds the engine will not start. When Alex gets out to look under the hood, the leprechaun attacks in his tiny car and knocks the truck on its side. The friends flee to the house and slam the door, severing the leprechaun’s hand. Despite all they have seen, Tory still doubts the creature is a leprechaun until Alex tells her about the gold they hid in a well. Tory retrieves the satchel and gives it to the leprechaun, who is overjoyed to have his treasure returned. After counting the coins, however, he realizes he is still missing the piece Ozzie swallowed, and returns to terrorize them. Nathan shoots the leprechaun, but the gold has restored his magical abilities and he revives. Ozzie suggests they consult O’Grady, who moved into a nursing home after his stroke and would likely know how to kill the leprechaun. There, O’Grady instructs them to find a four-leaf clover, and Tory races back to the house to search for one. Meanwhile, Alex configures a trap in the barn, but the leprechaun attacks him. Once Tory finds a clover, Alex uses a slingshot to shoot the plant into the leprechaun’s mouth, causing his body to melt and tumble into the well. When the skeletal remains attempt to crawl back out, Nathan fills the well with gasoline and sets it on fire. As police arrive to investigate the explosion and Tory reunites with her father, the voice of the leprechaun echoes from the well, vowing to continue the search for every piece of his gold. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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