Life with Mikey (1993)

PG-13 | 91 mins | Comedy | 4 June 1993

Director:

James Lapine

Writer:

Marc Lawrence

Cinematographer:

Rob Hahn

Editor:

Robert Leighton

Production Designer:

Adrianne Lobel

Production Company:

Touchstone Pictures
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HISTORY

       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that after five years working as a writer and supervising producer on the hit television series, Family Ties (NBC, 22 Sep 1982—14 May 1989), Marc Lawrence decided to write a feature film script about a character facing similar changes in his career. Although former Family Ties star Michael J. Fox was selected as the “ideal” choice to portray “Michael Chapman,” a 24 Apr 1991 DV brief reported that Eddie Murphy had previously expressed interest in the role, which consequently stopped Walt Disney Pictures from putting the project into turnaround.
       According to a 19 Aug 1992 HR story, producer Scott Rudin began working with Lawrence in 1989. Incorrectly referring to the film by the title Waiting for Mickey, a 24 Apr 1992 Screen International brief announced the involvement of Australian director Michael Pattinson and producer Donald De Line. Neither were involved in the final film. HR also announced that Broadway playwright James Lapine had been hired to direct. As a result, several members of the cast and crew had theater backgrounds or collaborated with Lapine on previous stage productions.
       A 2—8 Jul 1992 Hollywood Drama-Logue item advertised an 11 Jul 1992 casting call for child actors in Hollywood, CA, and indicated that the character of “Angie Vega” had originally been named “Phoebe.” The 18 Aug 1992 HR noted that casting sessions were also held at the Walt Disney studios in Burbank, CA, as well as locations in Los Angeles and San Francisco, CA; New York City; Boston, MA; Chicago, IL; and Atlanta, GA. According ... More Less

       Production notes in AMPAS library files state that after five years working as a writer and supervising producer on the hit television series, Family Ties (NBC, 22 Sep 1982—14 May 1989), Marc Lawrence decided to write a feature film script about a character facing similar changes in his career. Although former Family Ties star Michael J. Fox was selected as the “ideal” choice to portray “Michael Chapman,” a 24 Apr 1991 DV brief reported that Eddie Murphy had previously expressed interest in the role, which consequently stopped Walt Disney Pictures from putting the project into turnaround.
       According to a 19 Aug 1992 HR story, producer Scott Rudin began working with Lawrence in 1989. Incorrectly referring to the film by the title Waiting for Mickey, a 24 Apr 1992 Screen International brief announced the involvement of Australian director Michael Pattinson and producer Donald De Line. Neither were involved in the final film. HR also announced that Broadway playwright James Lapine had been hired to direct. As a result, several members of the cast and crew had theater backgrounds or collaborated with Lapine on previous stage productions.
       A 2—8 Jul 1992 Hollywood Drama-Logue item advertised an 11 Jul 1992 casting call for child actors in Hollywood, CA, and indicated that the character of “Angie Vega” had originally been named “Phoebe.” The 18 Aug 1992 HR noted that casting sessions were also held at the Walt Disney studios in Burbank, CA, as well as locations in Los Angeles and San Francisco, CA; New York City; Boston, MA; Chicago, IL; and Atlanta, GA. According to production notes, newcomer Christina Vidal was not cast until two weeks before the start of production.
       Although an 11 Aug 1992 HR production chart listed a Sep 1992 start date, production notes confirm that principal photography began 19 Oct 1992 in Toronto, Canada. Interiors and a few exterior shots were filmed at the Cinevillage Studio Complex, Lakeshore Studios, and various existing locations. Remaining exteriors were completed when the production moved to New York City for an additional ten days, beginning 23 Dec 1992. Locations included the American Museum of Natural History, the Seagram Building, Lord & Taylor department store, Times Square, Wollman Rink in Central Park, and the Upper West Side. Principal photography concluded 4 Jan 1993.
       The 8 Jun 1993 DV announced the film’s seventh-place box-office debut, with a gross of $3,606,279. After three weeks in theaters, the 5 Jul 1993 issue of People magazine reported that Life with Mikey had earned a meager $9.3 million, and likely caused Universal Pictures to delay the release of Michael J. Fox’s starring vehicle, For Love or Money, from summer to early Oct 1993. Despite this “poor performance,” a 15 Nov 1993 LAT brief noted that Disney referred to the film as a “big hit” in promotional materials for its release on home videocassette.
      End credits include the following acknowledgment: “The producers wish to thank the Toronto Film Liaison Office, the Ontario Film Development Corporation, the City of Toronto and the New York Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1991.
---
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1993.
---
Hollywood Drama-Logue
2-8 Jul 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Aug 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 1992
p. 1, 16.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Jun 1993
p. 8, 91.
Los Angeles Times
4 Jun 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
15 Nov 1993.
---
New York Times
4 Jun 1993
Section C, p. 8.
People
5 Jul 1993.
---
Screen International
24 Apr 1992.
---
Variety
14 Jun 1993
pp. 54-55.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And Introducing
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures Presents
A Scott Rudin Production
A James Lapine Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
3d asst dir
Unit prod mgr, New York crew
2d asst dir, New York crew
2d asst dir, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
2d 2d asst dir, New York crew
DGA trainee, New York crew
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Gaffer
Best boy elec
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Addl photog, New York crew
1st asst cam, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Best boy elec, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Best boy grip, New York crew
Dolly grip, New York crew
Still photog, New York crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Art dir, New York crew
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Addl film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Asst ed (Toronto)
Asst ed (Toronto)
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dressing buyer
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Standby painter
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Set dec, New York crew
Leadman, New York crew
Prop master, New York crew
Asst prop master, New York crew
COSTUMES
Ward supv
Ward supv
Costumer to Mr. Fox
Set costumer
Ward supv, New York crew
Ward supv, New York crew
Costumer to Mr. Fox, New York crew
MUSIC
Orig score by
Mus supv
Mus consultant
Mus orch and cond by
Mus scoring mixer
Orch contractor
Mus preparation
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
ADR ed
Foley supv & mixer
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Foley artist
Re-rec mixer
ADR mixer
FX and Foley prod at
Re-rec at
Sd mixer, New York crew
Boom op, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Makeup artist to Mr. Fox
Key hairstylist
Hairstylist to Mr. Fox
Makeup artist, New York crew
Hairstylist, New York crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to Scott Rudin
Asst to James Lapine
Asst to Teri Schwartz
Asst to Marc Lawrence
Asst to Michael J. Fox
Scr supv
Asst loc mgr
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Toronto casting
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Extras casting
Prod asst
Prod asst
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Tutor
Unit pub
Prod auditor
1st asst accountant
Post prod accountant
Loc mgr, New York crew
Loc mgr, New York crew
Prod coord, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Transportation coord, New York crew
Transportation capt, New York crew
Extras casting, New York crew
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Addl stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor® coord
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Cold Enough To Snow," music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, performed by Jennifer Warnes, Jennifer Warnes appears courtesy of Private Music
"Life With Mikey Theme," music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Jack Feldman
"Hark! The Herald Angels Sing," arranged and performed by Betty
+
SONGS
"Cold Enough To Snow," music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, performed by Jennifer Warnes, Jennifer Warnes appears courtesy of Private Music
"Life With Mikey Theme," music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Jack Feldman
"Hark! The Herald Angels Sing," arranged and performed by Betty
"Feels Like Christmas," written by Cyndi Lauper, Rob Hyman and Eric Bazilian, performed by Cyndi Lauper, courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Kids," written by Lee Adams and Charles Strouse
"Everything's Coming Up Roses," written by Stephen Sondheim and Jule Styne
"Miss Otis Regrets (She's Unable To Lunch Today)," written by Cole Porter
"Give My Regards To Broadway," written by George M. Cohan, courtesy of Statler Records/Art Stone Theatrical
"Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah," written by Ray Gilbert and Allie Wrubel
"Dance For Me," written by Peter Amato
"A Spoonful Of Sugar," written by Richard Sherman and Robert Sherman
"Anything Goes," written by Cole Porter
"You're A Grand Old Flag," written by George M. Cohan, courtesy of Statler Records/Art Stone Theatrical
"Flying Blind," written by Marc Ferrari and Tommy Thayer
"Happy Birthday To You," written by Patty S. Hill and Mildred J. Hill
"Lullaby Of Broadway," written by Al Dubin and Harry Warren.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 June 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 4 June 1993
Production Date:
19 October 1992--4 January 1993
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures an accepted alternative of the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
10 June 1993
Copyright Number:
PA612885
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®; Produced and distributed on Eastman Film
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32490
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Still clinging to the fame of his hit television sitcom, Life with Mikey, former child actor Michael Chapman struggles to maintain the New York City child talent agency he co-owns with his brother, Ed. One afternoon, Ed brings Michael to a commercial set to see their prized client, a bratty twelve-year-old named Barry Corman. The boy feels that Michael has not been supportive enough of his career as a breakfast cereal spokesman, but Michael refuses to appease him with an apology. Frustrated by his brother’s attitude, Ed considers quitting the business to pursue a more stable job that will support his family. Although Michael promises to pull his weight, he spends the weekend absorbed in his own faded stardom, appearing at a fan convention and watching old episodes of his television show. On Thanksgiving Day, a ten-year-old girl steals Michael’s wallet, and he chases her into an Upper West Side subway station. Pulling out a switchblade knife, she kicks him in the shin and runs away. Michael emerges from the station to find the girl telling an elaborate story to a crowd of wealthy onlookers, tearfully claiming that she pickpockets money so she can buy Christmas presents for her impoverished family. Impressed by her acting abilities, Michael introduces himself and searches for his business card, but by the time he looks up, she has disappeared. Sometime later, the girl calls his office, agreeing to return his wallet. They meet at a diner, and she introduces herself as Angie Vega, an orphan living with her teenaged sister in Brooklyn. Offering to represent ... +


Still clinging to the fame of his hit television sitcom, Life with Mikey, former child actor Michael Chapman struggles to maintain the New York City child talent agency he co-owns with his brother, Ed. One afternoon, Ed brings Michael to a commercial set to see their prized client, a bratty twelve-year-old named Barry Corman. The boy feels that Michael has not been supportive enough of his career as a breakfast cereal spokesman, but Michael refuses to appease him with an apology. Frustrated by his brother’s attitude, Ed considers quitting the business to pursue a more stable job that will support his family. Although Michael promises to pull his weight, he spends the weekend absorbed in his own faded stardom, appearing at a fan convention and watching old episodes of his television show. On Thanksgiving Day, a ten-year-old girl steals Michael’s wallet, and he chases her into an Upper West Side subway station. Pulling out a switchblade knife, she kicks him in the shin and runs away. Michael emerges from the station to find the girl telling an elaborate story to a crowd of wealthy onlookers, tearfully claiming that she pickpockets money so she can buy Christmas presents for her impoverished family. Impressed by her acting abilities, Michael introduces himself and searches for his business card, but by the time he looks up, she has disappeared. Sometime later, the girl calls his office, agreeing to return his wallet. They meet at a diner, and she introduces herself as Angie Vega, an orphan living with her teenaged sister in Brooklyn. Offering to represent her, Michael falsifies a resumé and takes her to a cookie commercial audition, where he charms the star-struck casting director into letting Angie read for the role. Angie’s frankness with the company owner, Mr. Corcoran, wins her the part, and Michael has Angie’s sister sign the commercial contract on her behalf. Angie convinces Michael to let her stay at his apartment until the commercial is complete, and the two clash once Angie moves into his bedroom and attempts to repair his messy living habits. When she refuses to return to school, Michael tells her about his isolated and unhappy experience being tutored on the Life with Mikey set. Angie relents, and Michael walks her to school the next morning. She returns with a swollen black eye—the result of a cafeteria fight with another student—that she poorly conceals with makeup. On the day of the Corcoran commercial shoot, Angie struggles to hide her thick Brooklyn accent while reading her lines, but after several dozen takes, completes the work to Mr. Corcoran’s approval. In the few weeks before Christmas, Angie films several more television spots and develops a close relationship with Michael. When she gets into another fight at school, Michael is called in to speak with her teacher, who informs him that Angie has problems expressing herself among the other children. Realizing he is Angie’s only trusted guardian, Michael throws her a party at the agency so she can socialize with other young clients, but the gesture leaves her embarrassed when she realizes he invited a boy she likes. Michael restores her confidence with an inspiring pep talk, and Angie enjoys the rest of the evening. The next day, Michael and Ed are summoned to Mr. Corcoran’s office, assuming that the businessman plans to make Angie his national spokesperson. In the meeting, however, they learn that Angie’s father is still alive and living in an upstate rehabilitation center, invalidating the contract signed by her sister. Since the commercials are now unairable, Corcoran threatens to sue the Chapmans if they cannot obtain the proper signature by the end of the day. Determined to save the business, Michael drives upstate to speak with Angie’s father, who consents to her showbusiness career, but harbors many regrets about his troubled relationship with his daughter. Michael returns home and suggests Angie move back in with her sister. Upon learning that he met her father, Angie complies, calling Michael a “has-been” who needs to straighten out his life. Over the next few days, Michael and Angie return to their separate routines, but are miserable without each other’s company. On Christmas Eve, Barry Corman’s mother stops by the office to announce that Barry plans to act on his long-standing threat to sign with a competing agency. After the meeting, Michael learns that Angie has been caught shoplifting at Lord & Taylor department store. When he goes to the store to talk to her, one of the employees excitedly notices Angie’s cookie commercial airing on the breakroom television. They decide to let her go, and Angie agrees to spend the remainder of the holiday with her father. Barry’s departure eventually causes the Chapman agency to close, but Angie, aware of the boy’s attraction to her, convinces him to return to Chapman. Although Ed welcomed the chance to start a new career, he begrudgingly accepts Michael’s plea to extend their partnership. Officially back in business, Michael signs a promising new client with an impressive singing voice, and the children celebrate. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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