Look Who's Talking Now (1993)

PG | 96 mins | Comedy, Romance | 5 November 1993

Director:

Tom Ropelewski

Producer:

Jonathan D. Krane

Cinematographer:

Oliver Stapleton

Production Designer:

Michael Bolton

Production Company:

TriStar Pictures
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HISTORY

Opening credits are superimposed over footage of canine sperm fertilizing an egg, which, according to the 20 Oct 1993 HR, was the reason for the film’s PG-13 rating.
       End credits include “Special Thanks to: City of Vancouver; Pacific National Exhibition; Bridge Studiosdios; NBC; NBA Entertainment, Inc.”
       Look Who’s Talking Now is the third film in TriStar Pictures’ series starring Kirstie Alley and John Travolta, following Look Who’s Talking (1989, see entry), and Look Who’s Talking Too (1990, see entry). Although Look Who’s Talking Too was not well received by domestic audiences, producer-writer Leslie Dixon told the 20 Oct 1993 HR that its financial success overseas prompted the studio to move ahead with a third installment, tentatively titled Look Who’s Talking 3 and Look Who’s Talking III. Because Alley did not want to do another sequel, filmmakers initially developed a script in which “Mollie Ubriacco,” had died, leaving her children to find a new wife for Travolta’s character, “John.” However, executives felt that Mollie’s death was inappropriate for a family film, and director Tom Ropelewski, who previously worked with Alley on his debut feature, Madhouse (1990, see entry), convinced her to return. Alley accepted, since she was preparing to end her run as “Rebecca Howe” on the NBC Television Network situational comedy, Cheers (30 Sep 1982—20 May 1993) around the time of production. The 3 Feb 1993 LADN reported that the updated script was expected to be completed that week. A 12 May 1993 Var brief stated that Alley and Travolta were each paid ... More Less

Opening credits are superimposed over footage of canine sperm fertilizing an egg, which, according to the 20 Oct 1993 HR, was the reason for the film’s PG-13 rating.
       End credits include “Special Thanks to: City of Vancouver; Pacific National Exhibition; Bridge Studiosdios; NBC; NBA Entertainment, Inc.”
       Look Who’s Talking Now is the third film in TriStar Pictures’ series starring Kirstie Alley and John Travolta, following Look Who’s Talking (1989, see entry), and Look Who’s Talking Too (1990, see entry). Although Look Who’s Talking Too was not well received by domestic audiences, producer-writer Leslie Dixon told the 20 Oct 1993 HR that its financial success overseas prompted the studio to move ahead with a third installment, tentatively titled Look Who’s Talking 3 and Look Who’s Talking III. Because Alley did not want to do another sequel, filmmakers initially developed a script in which “Mollie Ubriacco,” had died, leaving her children to find a new wife for Travolta’s character, “John.” However, executives felt that Mollie’s death was inappropriate for a family film, and director Tom Ropelewski, who previously worked with Alley on his debut feature, Madhouse (1990, see entry), convinced her to return. Alley accepted, since she was preparing to end her run as “Rebecca Howe” on the NBC Television Network situational comedy, Cheers (30 Sep 1982—20 May 1993) around the time of production. The 3 Feb 1993 LADN reported that the updated script was expected to be completed that week. A 12 May 1993 Var brief stated that Alley and Travolta were each paid $2 million to reprise their roles.
       According to a 3 Aug 1993 DV article, filmmakers decided against having Bruce Willis return as the voice of the “Ubriaccos’” toddler son, “Mikey,” and instead wrote a script that included the inner monologue of the family’s two dogs, “Rocks” and “Daphne.” Meryl Streep was originally attached to provide the voice of Daphne, but was forced to drop out of negotiations when she agreed to star in The River Wild (1994, see entry).
       The 8 Jun 1993 HR indicated that principal photography began on 22 Apr 1993 in the Vancouver, Canada, area, which doubled for Manhattan and upstate New York. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, scenes were shot at Mount Seymour Demonstration Forest, Vancouver International Airport, Bowen Island, and Bridge Studios in Burnaby, Canada.
       All animal action was monitored by a member of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Although the dogs that portrayed Rocks and Daphne were trained for two months prior to production, certain scenes were not performed as planned. Instead of reshooting the material, Ropelewski told the 18 Oct 1993 HR that he and Dixon rewrote the dialogue to reflect footage filmed on the set, and required Diane Keaton and Danny DeVito to re-record some of their lines.
       According to the 20 Oct 1993 HR, production cost roughly $19.5 million, which was considered “well below” the average $28.9 million budget of studio pictures at the time.
       A 16 Aug 1993 Var article reported that Sony Pictures chairman Peter Guber hoped to capitalize on the international success of Jordy Lemoine, a five-year-old French “singing sensation,” by including the toddler in the film. Because co-writer Leslie Dixon was unable to complete a script rewrite in time for production, Travolta, Alley, David Gallagher, and Tabitha Lupien filmed a music video for the song, “It’s Christmas, C’est Noel,” which played over end credits for the film’s release in certain foreign territories.
       Look Who’s Talking Now opened in 1,800 theaters on 5 Nov 1993, and received overwhelmingly negative reviews. The 30 Dec 1993 Boston Herald reported a domestic box-office gross of $10 million, making it the lowest earning film in the franchise. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Boston Herald
30 Dec 1993
Entertainment, p. 32.
Daily Variety
21 Apr 1993.
---
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jun 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1993
p. 11, 16.
Los Angeles Daily News
3 Feb 1993
LA Beat.
Los Angeles Times
5 Nov 1993
Calendar, p. 14.
New York Times
5 Nov 1993
Section C, p. 12.
Variety
12 May 1993.
---
Variety
16 Aug 1993
p. 1, 46.
Variety
15 Nov 1993
p. 31.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
TriStar Pictures Presents
A Jonathan D. Krane Production
A Tom Ropelewski Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
DGC trainee
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
"B" cam op
"B" cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Elec best boy
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Rigging grip
Still photog
Cam systems by
2d unit dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Graphic artist
Storyboard artist
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec buyer
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Props buyer
Mikey's artwork by
Const coord
Const foreman
Head painter
Greensman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus ed
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
ADR ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Supv Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Post prod facilities
Culver City, California
Sd mixer
Boom op
Boom op
VISUAL EFFECTS
Flying eff supv
Flying eff shop foreman
Flying eff head rigger
Spec eff coord
Visual eff coord
Spec visual eff and titles by
Visual eff supv, SPI
Exec prod, SPI
Plate supv, SPI
Prod, SPI
Prod coord, SPI
Asst prod coord, SPI
Assoc prod, SPI
Dir of photog, SPI
Cam asst, SPI
Computer graphics anim, SPI
Computer graphics anim, SPI
Computer graphics anim, SPI
Computer graphics anim, SPI
Computer graphics anim, SPI
Computer graphics anim, SPI
Computer graphics anim, SPI
Previsualization anim, SPI
Opticals, SPI
Ed supv, SPI
Sr film rec, SPI
DANCE
Tabitha Lupien's dance coach
Ballroom rehearsal partner
MAKEUP
Key makeup artist
Asst makeup artist
Key hairstylist
Asst hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Animals supplied & coord by
Digital film scanning provided by
Asst cost des
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Accounts clerk
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Scr supv
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Children's set supv
Tabitha Lupien's dance coach
Unit pub
Group ADR coord
Casting
Casting
Extras casting
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
First aid/Craft service
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Jonathan D. Krane
Asst to Tom Ropelewski
Asst to Tom Ropelewski
Asst to Fitch Cady
Asst to John Travolta
Asst to Kirstie Alley
Asst to Kirstie Alley
Catering
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Amy Heckerling.
SONGS
"Hound Dog," written by Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of The RCA Records Label of BMG Music
"I'm Henry The VII, I Am," written by Fred Murray & R. P. Weston
"Wipe Out," written by Robert Berryhill, Patrick Connolly, Jim Fuller & Ron Wilson, performed by The Surfaris, courtesy of MCA Records
+
SONGS
"Hound Dog," written by Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of The RCA Records Label of BMG Music
"I'm Henry The VII, I Am," written by Fred Murray & R. P. Weston
"Wipe Out," written by Robert Berryhill, Patrick Connolly, Jim Fuller & Ron Wilson, performed by The Surfaris, courtesy of MCA Records
"Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town," written by J. Fred Coots & Haven Gillespie
"The Chipmunk Song," written by Ross Bagdasarian, performed by The Chipmunks, courtesy of EMI Records USA, A division of ERG, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"I'm Flying," written by Carolyn Leigh & Mark Charlap
"Please Come Home For Christmas," written by Charles Brown & Gene Redd, produced by Phil Galdson, performed by Jonell Mosser, courtesy of Karambolage Records/MCA Records
"The Very Thought Of You," written by Ray Noble
"Little Drummer Boy," written by Harry Simeone, Katherine Davis & Henry Onorati, performed by Hoodoo Gurus
"Witchcraft," written by Carolyn Leigh & Cy Coleman
"Have A Little Faith In Me," written and performed by John Hiatt, courtesy of A&M Records, Inc.
"Sleigh Ride," written by Mitchell Paris & Leroy Anderson, produced by Jeff Pescetto, performed by PHD, courtesy of Karambolage Records/MCA Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 November 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 5 November 1993
Production Date:
began 22 April 1993
Copyright Claimant:
TriStar Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
12 November 1993
Copyright Number:
PA677928
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
96
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32666
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While preparing her two rambunctious children for school, Mollie Ubriacco coaches her husband, James, for an upcoming job interview to fly private jets for an international costmetics firm. However, it is James’s “corny” sense of humor that charms the uptight CEO, Samantha D’Bonne, and secures him the position as her personal pilot. That same day, Mollie loses her job as an accountant due to company cutbacks. With no prospective interviews, she accepts a job working as a holiday elf alongside a department store Santa Claus. The Ubriaccos’ son, Mikey, asks “Santa” for a dog for Christmas, but later sneaks into the break room and catches the actor without his beard. Distraught to learn Santa Claus is not real, Mikey becomes morose. Despite Mollie’s objections, James takes Mikey to the pound to pick out a pet dog. There, he selects a mutt on his way to be euthanized, and decides to name him “Rocks.” However, they return home to find that James’s boss, Samantha, has decided to give them Daphne, her prissy, purebred poodle, who forms an immediate attachment to the Ubriaccos’ daughter, Julie. Mollie is furious, but agrees to keep both dogs until they decide which would be better suited for their family. While Daphne is well trained, Rocks rummages through the garbage, drinks from the toilet, urinates in the apartment, and chews on Mollie’s shoes. Meanwhile, Samantha requires James to take her on several overseas trips, causing Mollie to become jealous. After an extended jaunt to Paris, France, James treats Mollie and her mother, Rosie, to dinner at a fancy restaurant. They run into Samantha, who plainly flirts with James in front of them. When Mollie voices objection ... +


While preparing her two rambunctious children for school, Mollie Ubriacco coaches her husband, James, for an upcoming job interview to fly private jets for an international costmetics firm. However, it is James’s “corny” sense of humor that charms the uptight CEO, Samantha D’Bonne, and secures him the position as her personal pilot. That same day, Mollie loses her job as an accountant due to company cutbacks. With no prospective interviews, she accepts a job working as a holiday elf alongside a department store Santa Claus. The Ubriaccos’ son, Mikey, asks “Santa” for a dog for Christmas, but later sneaks into the break room and catches the actor without his beard. Distraught to learn Santa Claus is not real, Mikey becomes morose. Despite Mollie’s objections, James takes Mikey to the pound to pick out a pet dog. There, he selects a mutt on his way to be euthanized, and decides to name him “Rocks.” However, they return home to find that James’s boss, Samantha, has decided to give them Daphne, her prissy, purebred poodle, who forms an immediate attachment to the Ubriaccos’ daughter, Julie. Mollie is furious, but agrees to keep both dogs until they decide which would be better suited for their family. While Daphne is well trained, Rocks rummages through the garbage, drinks from the toilet, urinates in the apartment, and chews on Mollie’s shoes. Meanwhile, Samantha requires James to take her on several overseas trips, causing Mollie to become jealous. After an extended jaunt to Paris, France, James treats Mollie and her mother, Rosie, to dinner at a fancy restaurant. They run into Samantha, who plainly flirts with James in front of them. When Mollie voices objection to Samantha’s obvious advances, James insists she can trust him to remain faithful. At home, Rocks accidentally destroys Daphne’s doghouse. In revenge, Daphne chews a pair of Mollie’s most expensive shoes, knowing she will blame it on Rocks and have him sent back to the pound. As Christmas approaches, Mollie and the children become increasingly unhappy with the amount of time James spends away from home. One night, Rocks unlocks the apartment door so Daphne can relieve herself. As the two dogs explore the city, Daphne enjoys the freedom of wandering without a leash and reconsiders her prejudice against Rocks. Realizing he is more intelligent than he seems, Daphne teaches him commands, such as “sit” and “beg,” to impress Mollie. Just when they have become friends, Mollie finds the shoe Daphne destroyed and forces Rocks to sleep on the patio. On Christmas Eve, Samantha tells James about a critical business deal and insists he fly her to meet an associate, Mr. Conti, at his mountain cabin upstate. Once there, she plants a falsified fax message from Mr. Conti reporting that he will be delayed until the following morning. James is determined not to miss his family’s Christmas celebration, but a violent blizzard deters his efforts to leave. Unable to get any information from Samantha’s secretary about her husband’s whereabouts, Mollie calls Mr. Conti’s office and learns that the executive is actually in the Bahamas with his family. Finally convinced that James and Samantha are having an affair, Mollie bursts into tears, upsetting the children. Although Rosie convinces her daughter that James would never cheat on her, Mollie tricks Samantha’s secretary into revealing the location of the cabin and sets off with the children and dogs. On the way, Mollie loses control of the car and careens over a snow bank into a ravine. A wolf appears, but Rocks comes to their defense and chases it away. Picking up James’s scent, Rocks runs toward the cabin while Daphne searches for help. Meanwhile, Samantha attempts to seduce James by asking for dance lessons, but James sees through the ruse and scorns her lack of morals. Just then, Rocks scratches at the door, and James follows the dog back in the direction of the car. When they arrive, however, the family has already been picked up and taken to the ranger station. As they continue their search, Rocks and James encounter the spurned wolf, now accompanied by its pack. Rocks scares them off before leading James the rest of the way to the station. The Ubriaccos are happily reunited, and Daphne is overjoyed to see Rocks is still alive. Knowing the mutt was responsible for saving her husband’s life, Mollie agrees to keep both dogs. Suddenly, the park ranger picks up an unknown radio broadcast similar to the sound of sleigh bells, which reaffirms Mikey’s belief in Santa Claus. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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