Mad Dog and Glory (1993)

R | 97 mins | Comedy-drama, Romance | 5 March 1993

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HISTORY

Although not included in music credits, Bill Murray’s character, “Frank Milo,” sings lyrics to the Irwin Levine and L. Russell Brown song, “Knock Three Times.”
       On 14 Jul 1989, DV announced that Richard Price was set to produce Mad Dog and Glory along with Glenn Gordon Caron, who would also direct. A 4 Jul 1990 Var news item named Martin Scorsese as executive producer, marking the filmmaker’s third time working with Price following The Color of Money (1986, see entry) and New York Stories (1989, see entry).
       A few months later, however, the 15 Sep 1989 LAHExam reported that Caron had quit the project after struggling to find two suitable lead actors with similar availability for filming. Among those considered were Michael Keaton and Richard Dreyfuss, who both reportedly passed on the picture.
       According to a 14 May 1991 HR article, John McNaughton stepped in to replace Caron after Scorsese approached him with the script. The 9-16 Jun 1993 issue of Time Out (London) stated that longtime Scorsese collaborator Robert De Niro read for both “Wayne Dobie” and Frank Milo. Although Milo, the intimidating gangster, was considered the more obvious choice, De Niro decided to play shy photographer Wayne instead, and suggested Bill Murray to star opposite him in what the 14 May 1991 HR noted was the actor’s first attempt at a dramatic role since the “critical and box office bomb,” The Razor’s Edge (1984, see entry). Items in AMPAS library files indicate that De Niro also recommended Kathy Baker, his co-star from 1989’s Jacknife (see ... More Less

Although not included in music credits, Bill Murray’s character, “Frank Milo,” sings lyrics to the Irwin Levine and L. Russell Brown song, “Knock Three Times.”
       On 14 Jul 1989, DV announced that Richard Price was set to produce Mad Dog and Glory along with Glenn Gordon Caron, who would also direct. A 4 Jul 1990 Var news item named Martin Scorsese as executive producer, marking the filmmaker’s third time working with Price following The Color of Money (1986, see entry) and New York Stories (1989, see entry).
       A few months later, however, the 15 Sep 1989 LAHExam reported that Caron had quit the project after struggling to find two suitable lead actors with similar availability for filming. Among those considered were Michael Keaton and Richard Dreyfuss, who both reportedly passed on the picture.
       According to a 14 May 1991 HR article, John McNaughton stepped in to replace Caron after Scorsese approached him with the script. The 9-16 Jun 1993 issue of Time Out (London) stated that longtime Scorsese collaborator Robert De Niro read for both “Wayne Dobie” and Frank Milo. Although Milo, the intimidating gangster, was considered the more obvious choice, De Niro decided to play shy photographer Wayne instead, and suggested Bill Murray to star opposite him in what the 14 May 1991 HR noted was the actor’s first attempt at a dramatic role since the “critical and box office bomb,” The Razor’s Edge (1984, see entry). Items in AMPAS library files indicate that De Niro also recommended Kathy Baker, his co-star from 1989’s Jacknife (see entry), to play “Lee.” After several months auditioning actresses in Los Angeles, CA; Chicago, IL; and New York City, Uma Thurman was cast as “Glory,” despite her being somewhat younger than was originally intended for the role. The 13 Jul 1991 HR stated that De Niro spent several weeks researching with the New York Police Department’s Crime Scene Unit. However, the 10 Jun 1991 Var announced that the previously New York City-set production was forced to film in Chicago due to scheduling demands.
       A 16 Jul 1991 HR production chart indicated that principal photography began the previous day. Locations included The Warehouse nightclub, where scenes in Milo’s comedy club were filmed; Bravissimo! Italian restaurant; Club Lago; the White Palace Grill; and a greystone apartment building in the Lincoln Park neighborhood, which doubled as the exterior of Wayne’s home.
       Shortly after its 5 Mar 1993 opening, the 3 May 1993 DV reported that Mad Dog and Glory had completed its theatrical run with less than $11 million in domestic earnings. Although reception of the film was mixed, critics consistently praised De Niro and Murray for their strong performances in roles that were considered “against type.”
       End credits state: “Special thanks to: Michael Burchette/The Mayfair Regent Hotel; Barbara Kogen/The Ambassador East Hotel; Paul Petraitis; Cinecenter, Chicago; Z Post; The Honorable Mayor Richard M. Daley, Mayor of City of Chicago; State of Illinois Film Office/Suzy Kellett, Al Cohn, Richard Moskal; Chicago Film Office/Charles Geocaris; and the following technical advisors: Wayne Barney, Jerry Donohue, John Manca, Rich Malloy, Hal Sherman, Lt. James Wood.” Acknowledgements also note: “The Major League Baseball trademarks depicted in this program were licensed by Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.” and, “Frankenstein Meets The Wolfman (Audio) and Law and Order and The Munsters footage courtesy of MCA/Universal.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1989.
---
Daily Variety
3 May 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1991
p. 1, 22.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jul 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Mar 1993
p. 10, 80.
LAHExam
15 Sep 1989
Section A, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
5 Mar 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
New York Times
5 Mar 1993
Section C, p. 3.
Time Out (London)
9-16 Jun 1993
p. 28.
Variety
4 Jul 1990.
---
Variety
10 Jun 1991.
---
Variety
1 Mar 1993
p. 56.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Universal Pictures presents
a Martin Scorsese Barbara De Fina production
a John McNaughton film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam/Steadicam op
Chicago gaffer
Chicago best boy
Best boy
Elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Generator op
Addl photog
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Arriflex cams by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept asst
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
1st asst ed
2d asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Swing gang
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const coord
Carpenter foreman
Head scenic painter
Scenic paint lead
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Muralist
Standby painter
Wayne's photographs
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Set costumer
Set costumer
Asst to costumers
MUSIC
Mus scoring mixer
Orch contractor
Addl mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Foley supv
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley artist
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Boom op
Sd cableman
Dolby Stereo consultant
Post prod facilities
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Addl opticals
Main title des
MAKEUP
Mr. De Niro's make-up and hair
Mr. Murray's make-up
Ms. Thurman's make-up and hair
Key hair stylist
Spec make-up
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst
Asst to Ms. DeFina
Asst to Mr. Scorsese
Asst to Mr. McNaughton/Mr. Jones
Asst to Mr. De Niro
Asst to Mr. Murray
Mr. De Niro's personal fitness trainer
Key tech adv
Medic
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Transportation coord
Transportation co-capt
Co-capt and cam truck
Casting asst
Extras casting
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt person
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
COLOR PERSONNEL
Lab coord/Technicolor
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Hand On The Pump," written by Lawrence Muggerud, Louis Freeze and Brett Bouldin, performed by Cypress Hill, courtesy of Ruffhouse/Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"That Old Black Magic," written by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer, performed by Louis Prima and Keely Smith, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl," written by Willy DeVille, performed by Mink DeVille, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
+
SONGS
"Hand On The Pump," written by Lawrence Muggerud, Louis Freeze and Brett Bouldin, performed by Cypress Hill, courtesy of Ruffhouse/Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"That Old Black Magic," written by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer, performed by Louis Prima and Keely Smith, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Mixed Up, Shook Up Girl," written by Willy DeVille, performed by Mink DeVille, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Love And Happiness," written by Al Green and Mabon Hodges, performed by Al Green, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., under license from PolyGram Special Markets
"Iceblink Luck," written by Elizabeth Fraser, Robin Guthrie and Simon Raymonde, performed by Cocteau Twins, courtesy of 4 A.D./Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Twice As Hard," written by Chris Robinson and Rick Robinson, performed by Black Crowes, courtesy of Def American/Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Oh Girl," written by Eugene Record, performed by The Chi-Lites, courtesy of Brunswick Special Markets, a division of Score Productions, Inc.
"Midnight Train To Georgia," written by James Weatherly, performed by Gladys Knight & The Pips, courtesy of Essex Entertainment, Inc., by arrangement with Celebrity Licensing, Inc.
"Just A Gigolo/I Ain't Got Nobody," written by Irving Caeser, Leo Naello Casucci, Spencer Williams, Roger Graham, performed by Louis Prima, courtesy of Capitol Records, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets.
+
PERFORMERS
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DETAILS
Release Date:
5 March 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 5 March 1993
Production Date:
began 15 July 1991
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios, Inc.
Copyright Date:
23 June 1993
Copyright Number:
PA626674
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
97
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31990
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While working the night shift, Chicago, Illinois crime scene photographer Wayne Dobie is sent to inspect a double homicide with his partner, Mike, who jokingly calls Wayne “Mad Dog” for his consistently mild-mannered demeanor. Afterward, Wayne stops in a nearby convenience store and encounters the killer holding gangster Frank Milo at gunpoint behind the counter. Wayne timidly convinces the murderer to spare Frank’s life and only draws his gun once the felon flees. Sarcastically critiquing Wayne’s abilities as a police officer, Frank Milo quickly slips out of the store. As he groggily trudges back to his apartment, Wayne bumps into his neighbor, Lee, but declines her invitation to have coffee. Later, Mike comforts Wayne about the incident and encourages the forlorn bachelor to seek companionship. When Mike leaves, a man named Harold passes Wayne a mysterious invitation to his boss’s standup comedy club, but refuses to disclose the name of his employer. Hoping to avoid another evening alone, Wayne attends the event, and is surprised when Frank Milo takes the stage. After his set, Frank reveals his therapist urged him to thank Wayne for saving his life. As they spend the evening drinking together, Wayne gives Frank tips for his comedy routine and confesses his desire to pursue photography as an art. Realizing Wayne is lonely and insecure, Frank sends the club cocktail waitress, Glory, to spend the week with him as his companion. The waitress reveals she provides “personal services” to help her brother pay off a debt to Frank. Taking pity on her, Wayne reluctantly lets her stay. As they become acquainted, Glory discusses her failed ambition to become an actress and notices that Frank’s lackey, Harold, ... +


While working the night shift, Chicago, Illinois crime scene photographer Wayne Dobie is sent to inspect a double homicide with his partner, Mike, who jokingly calls Wayne “Mad Dog” for his consistently mild-mannered demeanor. Afterward, Wayne stops in a nearby convenience store and encounters the killer holding gangster Frank Milo at gunpoint behind the counter. Wayne timidly convinces the murderer to spare Frank’s life and only draws his gun once the felon flees. Sarcastically critiquing Wayne’s abilities as a police officer, Frank Milo quickly slips out of the store. As he groggily trudges back to his apartment, Wayne bumps into his neighbor, Lee, but declines her invitation to have coffee. Later, Mike comforts Wayne about the incident and encourages the forlorn bachelor to seek companionship. When Mike leaves, a man named Harold passes Wayne a mysterious invitation to his boss’s standup comedy club, but refuses to disclose the name of his employer. Hoping to avoid another evening alone, Wayne attends the event, and is surprised when Frank Milo takes the stage. After his set, Frank reveals his therapist urged him to thank Wayne for saving his life. As they spend the evening drinking together, Wayne gives Frank tips for his comedy routine and confesses his desire to pursue photography as an art. Realizing Wayne is lonely and insecure, Frank sends the club cocktail waitress, Glory, to spend the week with him as his companion. The waitress reveals she provides “personal services” to help her brother pay off a debt to Frank. Taking pity on her, Wayne reluctantly lets her stay. As they become acquainted, Glory discusses her failed ambition to become an actress and notices that Frank’s lackey, Harold, is following them to ensure Wayne is happy. After having dinner, Wayne runs into Mike. The men discuss Wayne’s rapport with his neighbor, Lee, who is seated at the bar with her abusive boyfriend. Knowing the man is also a police officer, Wayne watches in awe as Mike stands up for Lee and urges her boyfriend to leave her alone. The next day, Wayne wonders if acting on his attraction to Glory would make her a prostitute. While watching a movie on television, Glory puts Wayne’s arm around her shoulders, and he considers kissing her. Sensing his interest, she pulls him into an intimate embrace, but Wayne becomes aroused too quickly and cannot perform. Glory insists he is a “sweet man” anyway, and the two spend the remainder of the evening taking photographs around the city. When they return home, Glory undresses and they make love several times. Wayne eventually leaves for work, where he is assigned to photograph a crime scene at an Italian restaurant. Unable to contain his glee, he puts money into the jukebox and surprises his associates by singing along to Louis Prima’s “Just A Gigolo" and "I Ain’t Got Nobody.” At the police station, Wayne walks in on Frank entertaining the other officers with his comedy routine. He rebuffs Frank’s friendly banter, which the gangster takes to mean Glory is not doing her job. During their last few days together, Wayne admits he loves Glory and tells Frank about their romance, hoping she does not have to return to his employ. Frank responds poorly to the news and sends Harold to Wayne’s apartment, where Mike fights for Glory on his friend’s behalf. Frank then offers to sell her for $40,000, provided Wayne can produce the money within three days. After telling Glory she has been freed from her contract to Frank, he secretly attempts to raise the funds, but comes up $12,500 short. Before long, Glory realizes the truth and decides she would rather leave than be considered someone else’s property again. Moments after she walks away, Frank arrives to punish Wayne for not settling up their agreement. With the rest of the police squad standing by, Wayne provokes a fight and gradually overtakes Frank by smashing his head against the front stoop. Glory returns, offering to end the dispute by leaving with her former boss. Fed up with their antics, Frank decides to let them both go, but expresses regret that he and Wayne could not be friends. Mike congratulates “Mad Dog” for standing up for himself, as Glory slings her bag over her shoulder. Although Wayne assumes she plans to move on with her life, Glory takes his hand and leads him upstairs to the apartment. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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