The Night We Never Met (1993)

R | 99 mins | Romantic comedy | 30 April 1993

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HISTORY

       The surname of camera trainee Richard Shirabella is misspelled as “Shiarella.”
       According to a 29 Apr 1993 HR article, writer-playwright Warren Leight began working on the screenplay in 1987 for director Susan Seidelman and Orion Pictures. As Seidelman became involved with other projects, she opted to serve as associate producer as replacement directors were considered and the film was proposed to several studios. Although Leight hoped to be hired to make his feature directorial debut, he was frequently called away to complete other writing assignments before a deal could be made. Filmmakers considered expediting production by working in Pittsburgh, PA, or Toronto, Canada, but both Leight and producer Michael Peyser, a former associate producer on Woody Allen’s films Broadway Danny Rose (1984, see entry) and The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985, see entry), insisted on using authentic locations that matched the New York City setting.
       The 4 Aug 1990 Screen International reported the casting of Tim Robbins, with filming scheduled to begin in Oct 1990. However, the 18 Aug 1990 Screen International announced that the project, then in development at Hemdale Film Corporation, was delayed until early 1991. Laura San Giacomo and Harry Connick, Jr. were attached to star, but they do not appear in the final film, and Hemdale’s involvement was not noted in any later sources.
       Following another failed attempt to strike a production deal in Mar 1992, Leight received an offer from New York City’s One Dream Theatre Co. to stage a live reading of the screenplay with various actor and writer friends. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that actor Matthew Broderick received ... More Less

       The surname of camera trainee Richard Shirabella is misspelled as “Shiarella.”
       According to a 29 Apr 1993 HR article, writer-playwright Warren Leight began working on the screenplay in 1987 for director Susan Seidelman and Orion Pictures. As Seidelman became involved with other projects, she opted to serve as associate producer as replacement directors were considered and the film was proposed to several studios. Although Leight hoped to be hired to make his feature directorial debut, he was frequently called away to complete other writing assignments before a deal could be made. Filmmakers considered expediting production by working in Pittsburgh, PA, or Toronto, Canada, but both Leight and producer Michael Peyser, a former associate producer on Woody Allen’s films Broadway Danny Rose (1984, see entry) and The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985, see entry), insisted on using authentic locations that matched the New York City setting.
       The 4 Aug 1990 Screen International reported the casting of Tim Robbins, with filming scheduled to begin in Oct 1990. However, the 18 Aug 1990 Screen International announced that the project, then in development at Hemdale Film Corporation, was delayed until early 1991. Laura San Giacomo and Harry Connick, Jr. were attached to star, but they do not appear in the final film, and Hemdale’s involvement was not noted in any later sources.
       Following another failed attempt to strike a production deal in Mar 1992, Leight received an offer from New York City’s One Dream Theatre Co. to stage a live reading of the screenplay with various actor and writer friends. Production notes in AMPAS library files stated that actor Matthew Broderick received the script from a friend in the Naked Angels Theater Group in 1991. According to the 20-26 May 1993 issue of Drama-Logue, Leight suggested Broderick consider the role of “Brian McVeigh,” but the actor instead chose to play “Sam Lester.” He agreed to participate in the reading, and Leight contacted actress Annabella Sciorra through a mutual acquaintance. Miramax Films co-chairman Harvey Weinstein was in attendance and immediately offered to fund the project for $4 million, serving as executive producer. Although the figure was lower than other potential offers, Leight was willing to accept Weinstein’s terms, which enabled him to direct the picture. Since the now-bankrupt Orion still owned rights to the screenplay, Leight quickly negotiated a deal that enabled him to begin five weeks of preproduction on 15 Sep 1992, followed by a thirty-four day shooting schedule.
       A 13 Oct 1992 HR production chart listed an expected start date of 21 Oct 1992, but the 27 Oct 1992 HR indicated that filming began a day later, on 22 Oct 1992. The 22 Jan 1993 Screen International stated that production concluded before the Christmas holiday in Dec 1992, with a final cost of $8 million. Conflicting reports in the 29 Apr 1993 and 6 May 1993 HR suggested the film was produced for less than $5 million with the assistance of an East Coast Council deal, which paid the crew two-thirds of their minimum rate in exchange for a percentage of the backend. Broderick and Sciorra agreed to work for scale; Drama-Logue estimated Broderick’s pay at roughly $1,200 per week.
       The 29 Apr 1993 HR stated that the film was scheduled to open in 500 theaters on 30 Apr 1993. Reviews were generally mixed.
      End production credits are preceded by the statement: "The Night We Never Met was filmed and edited in New York City with the help of the following people." “Special thanks” are given to: Agnes Mentre; Ezra Domer; Rochel Blachman; Julie Landau; Debra Roth; Len White; Sylvia Meckle; John Hyde; Randall Poster; Nigel Pearson; Irwin Tenenbaum; Kathy Goodman; Paula Herold; Maya Garbassi; Ellen Lewis; Amy Lippens; Jay Stern; Marsha Woolf; Scott Dorman; Matthew Rowland; Rodney Liber; Eric Shonz; Tom O’Donnell, Sr.; David Alexander; Tom O’Donnell, Jr.; Bill Nisselson; Zara Metcalf; George Manos; Brian Unger and the East Coast Council; Dick DiBona and Scott Fleischer, General Camera; Laine, Melinda and the One Dream Theatre Co.; New York Stage and Film Co.; Naked Angels; Atlantic Theatre Co.; Adrian Scrope, F.I.L.M.S., Ltd.; David Gray and Katie Murrell, Chase Manhattan Bank; Abe Lerner and Mike Grassi, Love Pharmacy; Giorgio G. DeLuca and Joel B. Dean, Dean & DeLuca; The Princeton Architectural Review; NY Mayor’s Office for Film, Theatre & Broadcasting; NYPD Movie & TV Unit; Nassau County Office of Cinema and Television, Debra Markowitz, Director; Paramount Hotel; NHL Enterprises, Inc.; Mountain Valley Spring Company; Nike; Jones New York; American Fur Industries, Leonard & Donald Springer, Inc.; Allen and Allen; J. Crew; Lands End; Celebrity Eyeworks – Armani; After Six Apparel; Foods & Wines from France; Clipper Bay; National Football League,” and “Personal thanks” to: “Suzanne, Eric B.; Margaret Mercer; Betsy Israel; Ruth Mullen; Susan DePalma; Pat & Natalie; Anne Brooks; Chip Yaboo; George, Buddy & Lee; Lois W.; Kevin, Roz, John & Tim; Baby Luca; E. G. & Richard Loren; Cindy Lou; Don, Timmy, Jody & Edward; Lew of the West Bank; Susann of Alice’s; the S.F. Gang; the staff and clientele of Bleecker Street Pastry; and the New York Knicks.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Drama-Logue
20-26 May 1993
pp. 4-6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 1993
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 1993
p. 8, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Apr 1993
Section F, p. 4.
New York Times
30 Apr 1993
Section C, p. 10.
Screen International
4 Aug 1990.
---
Screen International
18 Aug 1990.
---
Screen International
22 Jan 1993.
---
Variety
26 Apr 1993
pp. 68-69.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Miramax Films presents
Miramax Films and Sidney Kimmel Present
A Michael Peyser Production
In Association with Tribeca Productions
A Warren Leight Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam trainee
Cam trainee
Unit still photog
Louma crane op
Steadicam op
Steadicam asst
Best boy elec
Company elec
Company elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Company grip
Video playback op
Video playback op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Art dept coord
Art dept PA
Art dept intern
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Editing intern
Editing intern
Negative matcher
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
2d dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Charge scenic
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Prop master
Asst props
Const coord
Lead carpenter
Shop craftsman
Key const grip
2d const grip
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
Ward supv
Ward PA
MUSIC
Mus supv
Asst mus ed
Trombone, Score musician
Bass clarinet, clarinet & tenor sax, Score musicia
Alto sax & clarinet, Score musician
Flugelhorn & trumpet, Score musician
Drums, Score musician
Double bass, Score musician
Guitar, Score musician
Guest soloist, Score musician
Mus rec studio
Rec eng
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Apprentice sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Foley artist
ADR eng
ADR eng
Temp mix eng
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Loop group
Post prod services
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
Titles and opticals, The Effects House Corp.
Titles and opticals, The Effects House Corp.
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Hair stylist
Make-up artist for Ms. Sciorra
Hair stylist for Ms. Sciorra
Ms. Tripplehorn's make-up des by
Ms. Tripplehorn's hair des by
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting
Prod accountant
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst accountant
Prod secy
Office prod asst
Ellen's paintings
Sam's cooking
Dialect coach
Visual consultant
Finnish translator
Loc mgr
Unit mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc intern
Post prod coord
Teamster capt
Driver
Driver
Driver
Asst to Warren Leight
Asst to Michael Peyser
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod intern
Set prod intern
Set prod intern
Continuity apprentice
Casting assoc
Casting assoc
Addl casting
Addl casting
Addl casting
Asst to Matthew Broderick
Asst to Annabella Sciorra
Parking coord
Craft service
Craft service, The Lost Diner
Caterers
Exec in charge of prod for Miramax Films
Assoc prod, Mike's Movies
Mike's Movies, Creative exec
Mike's Movies, Prod asst
Exec for Tribeca Productions
Pub, Dennis Davidson Associates, Inc.
Financing bank
Legal services
Completion guarantor
Accounting firm
Paymaster, Payroll service, Axium Entertainment Se
Product placement
Product placement
Product placement
Prod equip
Prod laboratory
STAND INS
Cabbie's stunt driver
COLOR PERSONNEL
Prints and timing
Toronto
Timer
SOURCES
SONGS
“Seek And You Shall Find,” performed by Marvin Gaye, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with Polygram Special Markets, written by William Stevenson & Ivy Jo Hunter, published by Jobete Music Co., Inc. & Stone Agate Music
“Rock Guitar Music,” written and performed by Adam Roch
“My Baby Just Cares For Me,” performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Markets, written by Walter Donaldson & Gus Kahn, Donaldson Music, Gilbert Keyes, WB Music Corp., ASCAP
+
SONGS
“Seek And You Shall Find,” performed by Marvin Gaye, courtesy of Motown Record Company, L.P., by arrangement with Polygram Special Markets, written by William Stevenson & Ivy Jo Hunter, published by Jobete Music Co., Inc. & Stone Agate Music
“Rock Guitar Music,” written and performed by Adam Roch
“My Baby Just Cares For Me,” performed by Nina Simone, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Markets, written by Walter Donaldson & Gus Kahn, Donaldson Music, Gilbert Keyes, WB Music Corp., ASCAP
“Missing You Already,” performed by Chesney Hawkes, written by Chesney Hawkes, Peter Vettese, Nick Kershaw, published by EMI Music Publishing/Warner Chappell Music, courtesy of Chrysalis Records Ltd.
“Bouncin’ Back,” performed by Robert Cray, courtesy of Mercury Records, by arrangement with Polygram Special Markets, written by Dennis Walker, Robishon Publishing, Adm. by Bug Publishing
“When I Need You,” performed by Leo Sayer, written by A. Hammond, C. Sager, published by EMI April Music Inc./Albert Hammond Music/Begonia Melodies, Inc./Leonard Cohen Stranger Music, Inc./R & M Music Inc./Unichappell Music, courtesy of Chrysalis Records, Ltd
“Candy,” performed by Dr. John, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products, written by Mack David, Alex Kramer, Joan Whitney, used by permission of EMI Feist Catalog, Inc., Bourne Co. Music Publishers, Polygram International Publishing Inc. (ASCAP)
“Magnet And Steel,” performed by Jeffrey Gaines, produced by William Wittman for Weedy Wet Productions, appears courtesy of Chrysalis Records, written by Walter Egan, used by permission of EMI April Music Inc., Melody Deluxe Music, Swell Sounds Music & Seldak Music
“Anonymous,” performed by Mr. Reality, written by Gordon Brown, published by EMI April Music Inc./Half Hour Publishing Co. (ASCAP), courtesy of SBK Records
“One Memory At A Time,” performed by Dale Watson & The Lone Stars, courtesy of Restless Records, ® 1992 Restless Records, written by D. Watson & D. Watson, published by Watson Texas Music (BMI)
“Your Love Keeps Liftin’ Me (Higher And Higher),” performed by Jackie Wilson, courtesy of Brunswick Special Markets, a division of Score Productions, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, written by Raymond Miner, Carl Smith & Gary Jackson, Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., Unichappell Music, Inc., & Chevis Music, Inc., © 1967 Chevis Publishing Corp
“Bad Mood,” performed by Lonnie Gordon, written by Lonnie Gordon, Mirko Limoni, Daniele Davoli, published by Gli Gnomi/Supreme Songs Ltd., courtesy of SBK Records
“Let This Housebeat Drop,” performed by Ya Kid K, written by Manuela Kamosi, Gail “Sky” King, published by EMI April Music Inc./Sky King Music (ASCAP)/EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Bantu Music (BMI), courtesy of SBK Records
“More Than You Know,” performed by Dr. John, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc. by arrangement with Warner Special Products, written by Vincent Youmans, Edward Eliscu & Billy Rose, WB Music Corp., Chappell and Co., & LSQ Music Co. ASCAP
“Come Back Home,” performed by Ya Kid K, written by Ya Kid K, published by EMI Blackwood Music Inc./Bantu Music (BMI), courtesy of SBK Records.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 April 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 30 April 1993
New York opening: week of 30 April 1993
Production Date:
22 October--December 1992
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Cameras and Lenses by Panavision®; Filmed in Panavision
Duration(in mins):
99
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, stockbroker Brian McVeigh moves in with his fiancée and decides to sublet his rent-controlled Greenwich Village apartment to two tenants, who each agree to reside there two nights a week. Eager for a reprieve from his messy East Village roommates, twenty-eight-year-old Sam Lester takes the apartment on Mondays and Saturdays; married dental hygienist Ellen Holder uses the space as a painting studio on Tuesdays and Thursdays; and Brian reserves Wednesday and Friday nights for playing poker with his rowdy fraternity friends. Still heartbroken over his breakup with his narcissistic French girl friend, Pastel, Sam Lester goes to see her in a contemporary theater performance and attempts to reconcile, but she rebuffs his advances. While working a shift at the cheese counter of the upscale Dean & DeLuca grocery store, Sam receives a telephone call from Brian McVeigh requesting to switch days in their arrangement. Sam’s coworker Kenneth decides to set him up on a blind date with an artistic, health-conscious woman named Catha, but she refuses to eat his cooking. Sam leaves a drawing and note for Ellen, suggesting she finish the leftover food in the refrigerator. Due to the schedule change, he signs the note “Wednesday,” prompting Ellen to believe it was left by Brian. Over the next few weeks, Sam and Ellen enjoy making renovations and leaving messages for one another, while Brian continues to trash the apartment with his friends. Still mistaking him for Brian, Ellen telephones Sam at work and yells at him for his messy habits. After an unsuccessful date with her husband, Aaron, Ellen invites him back to the apartment to make love, but he dismisses the property as ... +


In New York City, stockbroker Brian McVeigh moves in with his fiancée and decides to sublet his rent-controlled Greenwich Village apartment to two tenants, who each agree to reside there two nights a week. Eager for a reprieve from his messy East Village roommates, twenty-eight-year-old Sam Lester takes the apartment on Mondays and Saturdays; married dental hygienist Ellen Holder uses the space as a painting studio on Tuesdays and Thursdays; and Brian reserves Wednesday and Friday nights for playing poker with his rowdy fraternity friends. Still heartbroken over his breakup with his narcissistic French girl friend, Pastel, Sam Lester goes to see her in a contemporary theater performance and attempts to reconcile, but she rebuffs his advances. While working a shift at the cheese counter of the upscale Dean & DeLuca grocery store, Sam receives a telephone call from Brian McVeigh requesting to switch days in their arrangement. Sam’s coworker Kenneth decides to set him up on a blind date with an artistic, health-conscious woman named Catha, but she refuses to eat his cooking. Sam leaves a drawing and note for Ellen, suggesting she finish the leftover food in the refrigerator. Due to the schedule change, he signs the note “Wednesday,” prompting Ellen to believe it was left by Brian. Over the next few weeks, Sam and Ellen enjoy making renovations and leaving messages for one another, while Brian continues to trash the apartment with his friends. Still mistaking him for Brian, Ellen telephones Sam at work and yells at him for his messy habits. After an unsuccessful date with her husband, Aaron, Ellen invites him back to the apartment to make love, but he dismisses the property as a “slum.” Meanwhile, Sam finally realizes his relationship with Pastel is over after discovering she has been seeing other men. When Aaron Holder impulsively buys a home in the suburbs and begins planning a family, Ellen realizes she is unhappy and considers having an affair. Preparing for a date, she visits the Dean & DeLuca cheese counter, where Sam gives her advice about caviar. That night, she arrives at the apartment slightly inebriated and meets Brian, who seduces her. Across town, Ellen’s sister Lucy is forced to lie about Ellen’s whereabouts. After they have sex, Ellen is disappointed by Brian’s juvenile behavior, but learns she slept with the wrong man because he switched the apartment-sharing schedule. She leaves in tears and confesses her affair to her husband, Aaron, who agrees to pretend the incident never happened. Sometime later, Sam has a date with a Scandinavian tourist named Inga. As they begin to make love, Brian’s strait-laced fiancée, Janet Beehan, asks Sam, Brian, and Ellen’s nosy neighbors about what goes on in the apartment. Convinced that Brian is having an affair with Ellen, she barges inside and sends Inga away. Once his sexual frustration subsides, Sam is crestfallen by Janet’s suggestion that Ellen and Brian are an item, but consoles the woman with advice and leftover food. The next morning, Janet returns home and confers with Brian about the state of their relationship. Meanwhile, Aaron bullies Ellen while they work together at his dry cleaning business. Fed up, Ellen leaves and spends the night on an empty subway platform. At a club across town, Pastel sees her current boyfriend with another woman and desperately tries to dance with Sam, but he refuses to tolerate her fickle behavior. When he returns to the apartment, he receives a note from Brian terminating their lease and requesting he move out by Monday. He awakens the next morning to find Ellen asleep on a chair in the living room. Believing she and Brian are a couple, he bitterly scorns her for choosing their roommate over him. She confesses her mistake, and he recognizes her as the woman who bought caviar from him. On the way to his wedding to Janet, Brian stops by to announce that he will allow both Sam and Ellen to stay in the apartment. After formally introducing themselves, the two roommates kiss and leave the building, walking down the street hand in hand. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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