Nowhere to Run (1993)

R | 93 mins | Drama | 15 January 1993

Director:

Robert Harmon

Cinematographer:

David Gribble

Production Designer:

Dennis Washington

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures
Full page view
HISTORY

Referring to the picture as Pals, the 30 Jun 1992 DV announced the $15 million film would be the first of a three-picture deal between Columbia Pictures and actor Jean-Claude Van Damme. Santa Barbara, CA, was noted as a tentative location, and a 1 Apr 1992 start date was anticipated, in order to beat the expiration of Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) contracts on 30 Jun 1992. However, the 7 Apr 1992 HR production chart, which listed the alternate title, Crossing the Line, announced a May 1992 start date.
       A casting notice from the 21-27 May 1992 Drama-Logue announced an open call seeking a seven-to-nine-year-old male lead.
       Principal photography began on 8 Jun 1992 in Napa Valley, CA, according to the 9 Jun 1992 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files list locations in Occidental, CA, where filming occurred for nearly a month, and Los Angeles, CA, where filming was completed at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City.
       According to production notes, producer Craig Baumgarten developed the story ten years earlier from an idea by director Richard Marquand, who would later write the script with Joe Eszterhas. However, after Marquand died unexpectedly, the script sat for years on Baumgarten’s shelf. Searching for a project for actor Jean-Claude Van Damme, Baumgarten remembered the script, and felt it was a good fit.
       An advertisement in the 21 Jan 1993 HR announced $8,203,255 in box office receipts during its first four days in theaters.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: "Filmed at ... More Less

Referring to the picture as Pals, the 30 Jun 1992 DV announced the $15 million film would be the first of a three-picture deal between Columbia Pictures and actor Jean-Claude Van Damme. Santa Barbara, CA, was noted as a tentative location, and a 1 Apr 1992 start date was anticipated, in order to beat the expiration of Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) contracts on 30 Jun 1992. However, the 7 Apr 1992 HR production chart, which listed the alternate title, Crossing the Line, announced a May 1992 start date.
       A casting notice from the 21-27 May 1992 Drama-Logue announced an open call seeking a seven-to-nine-year-old male lead.
       Principal photography began on 8 Jun 1992 in Napa Valley, CA, according to the 9 Jun 1992 HR production chart. Production notes in AMPAS library files list locations in Occidental, CA, where filming occurred for nearly a month, and Los Angeles, CA, where filming was completed at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City.
       According to production notes, producer Craig Baumgarten developed the story ten years earlier from an idea by director Richard Marquand, who would later write the script with Joe Eszterhas. However, after Marquand died unexpectedly, the script sat for years on Baumgarten’s shelf. Searching for a project for actor Jean-Claude Van Damme, Baumgarten remembered the script, and felt it was a good fit.
       An advertisement in the 21 Jan 1993 HR announced $8,203,255 in box office receipts during its first four days in theaters.
       End credits include the following acknowledgements: "Filmed at Sony Pictures Studios, Culver City, California," and "Special Thanks to: GUESS? by George Marciano." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
30 Jan 1992.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jan 1993.
---
Drama-Logue
21-27 May 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Apr 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Jun 1992.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jan 1993
p. 8, 120.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Jan 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Jan 1993
Calendar, p. 3.
New York Times
16 Jan 1993
p. 16.
Variety
25 Jan 1993
p. 134.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
An Adelson/Baumgarten Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
2d unit dir, 2d unit
1st asst dir, 2d unit
2d asst dir, 2d unit
2d 2d asst dir, 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Key grip
2d grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Dir of photog, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
Cam op, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
1st asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
2d asst cam, 2d unit
Cam loader, 2d unit
Video asst, 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Storyboard artist, 2d unit
FILM EDITORS
1st asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
COSTUMES
Set costumer
MUSIC
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Co-supv sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Prod mixer
Boom op
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Foley by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff supv
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Prod accountant
Asst to Mr. Van Damme
Asst to Mr. Van Damme
Asst to Mr. Harmon
Asst to Mr. Rachmil
Asst to Mr. Baumgarten
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Boss wrangler
Craft service
Casting asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Scr supv, 2d unit
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"When My Ship Comes In," written by Clint Black and Hayden Nicholas, performed by Clint Black, courtesy of the RCA Records Label of BMG Music
"After All," written and performed by Charlie Mitchell, courtesy of Sony Pictures Entertainment Music Group
"The Doubt," written and performed by Charlie Mitchell, courtesy of Sony Pictures Entertainment Music Group
+
SONGS
"When My Ship Comes In," written by Clint Black and Hayden Nicholas, performed by Clint Black, courtesy of the RCA Records Label of BMG Music
"After All," written and performed by Charlie Mitchell, courtesy of Sony Pictures Entertainment Music Group
"The Doubt," written and performed by Charlie Mitchell, courtesy of Sony Pictures Entertainment Music Group
"Silence Is Broken," written by Ted Nugent, Tommy Shaw & Jack Blades, performed by Damn Yankees, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Pals
Crossing the Line
Release Date:
15 January 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 15 January 1993
Production Date:
8 June -- 26 August 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
26 February 1993
Copyright Number:
PA604376
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
93
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31741
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As prison inmates are being transported in Northern California, a car forces their bus to crash. The vehicle’s driver, Billy, holds the guard at gunpoint, and demands he release the prisoners, which includes his friend, Sam. Once freed, Sam takes the wheel of Billy’s car, but as they flee, Billy is shot by the guard. Before dying, he proudly tells Sam that he made good on his word to break him out of prison. Sam buries Billy in a field, and hides in the woods. At night, he sneaks to a nearby farmhouse, where he watches a pretty mother with her children. After they go to sleep, Sam enters to take some table salt, and is seen by the young son, Mookie Anderson. In the morning, Mookie asks his mother, Clydie, for some salt, then exclaims that he saw “E.T.” take it. When the house shudders from a dynamite explosion set off by a land developer, Clydie loses her temper with Mookie. The boy runs to the barn and looks through a box of mementos he keeps to remind him of his dead father. In the woods, Sam finds money and a tape recording left for him in Billy’s car, and pushes the vehicle into a nearby lake. Elsewhere, developer Franklin Hale introduces his new head of security, Mr. Dunston, to Lonnie, a local police officer. Hale asks Lonnie if he has made any headway convincing his “girl friend,” Clydie Anderson, to sell her land. Later, Sam returns to the Anderson home and overhears Lonnie warn Clydie that Franklin Hale may try to strong-arm her, because he needs her property for his development. Mookie sees Sam and follows him ... +


As prison inmates are being transported in Northern California, a car forces their bus to crash. The vehicle’s driver, Billy, holds the guard at gunpoint, and demands he release the prisoners, which includes his friend, Sam. Once freed, Sam takes the wheel of Billy’s car, but as they flee, Billy is shot by the guard. Before dying, he proudly tells Sam that he made good on his word to break him out of prison. Sam buries Billy in a field, and hides in the woods. At night, he sneaks to a nearby farmhouse, where he watches a pretty mother with her children. After they go to sleep, Sam enters to take some table salt, and is seen by the young son, Mookie Anderson. In the morning, Mookie asks his mother, Clydie, for some salt, then exclaims that he saw “E.T.” take it. When the house shudders from a dynamite explosion set off by a land developer, Clydie loses her temper with Mookie. The boy runs to the barn and looks through a box of mementos he keeps to remind him of his dead father. In the woods, Sam finds money and a tape recording left for him in Billy’s car, and pushes the vehicle into a nearby lake. Elsewhere, developer Franklin Hale introduces his new head of security, Mr. Dunston, to Lonnie, a local police officer. Hale asks Lonnie if he has made any headway convincing his “girl friend,” Clydie Anderson, to sell her land. Later, Sam returns to the Anderson home and overhears Lonnie warn Clydie that Franklin Hale may try to strong-arm her, because he needs her property for his development. Mookie sees Sam and follows him back to his tent. When Sam draws his gun, Mookie asks if he is a bad guy, and Sam puts his gun away and introduces himself. The boy returns the next day, followed by his little sister, Bree, and offers to help Sam light a campfire. Before sending them home, Sam learns that the children’s father is dead. Later, as Clydie and her children return to the farm from town, she sees that one of her calves has been killed. Hale’s thugs appear and smash the window of her pickup truck, but Sam arrives and fights them off. Clydie is surprised when Mookie declares that Sam is his friend. She invites Sam inside, and he tells her he is a lawyer from Quebec, Canada, camping nearby. Before Mookie goes to bed, he hugs Sam, and Clydie offers to let him sleep in her barn for a few nights. In the morning, she gives him some of her husband’s clothes. When Lonnie finds Sam showering in Clydie’s home, he holds him at gunpoint, until Clydie claims Sam is her cousin. She invites Sam to have dinner with the family, and agrees to sell him the broken-down motorcycle in her barn. Later, when Clydie turns down Franklin Hale’s offer to buy her property, he threatens that she may lose it anyway, because his bank will foreclose because of late mortgage payments. Hale holds a town meeting in hopes of convincing residents to allow his real estate development to move forward, and Clydie’s neighbor, Tom Lewis, protests Hale’s plans to cut down their forest. That night, Mookie awakens Sam when Tom Lewis’s barn catches fire, and Sam rescues Tom from the blaze. Later, Clydie invites Sam to join her and the children as they watch home movies. Watching her late husband, Sam tells Clydie he was also married before, and Clydie invites Sam to sleep in her room. He politely declines her invitation. As Sam and Clydie speak on the porch, Lonnie watches from a distance, growing increasingly jealous. Later, Clydie refuses Lonnie’s attempt to become intimate, and he leaves upset. When he returns and finds Sam in the barn, Lonnie handcuffs him and beats him with a nightstick. As Clydie nurses Sam back to health, she kisses him and they make love. One day, Hale’s security man, Mr. Dunston, arrives with Bree in tow, claiming he found the girl wandering around. Sam confronts Dunston, warning him to stop the threats. In time, Lonnie lets Sam know he has discovered his true identity, and asks him to leave quietly before anyone gets hurt. Sam confesses to Clydie that he was involved in a bank robbery, during which his partner, Billy, killed a guard. Clydie is angry that Sam led her on, and he agrees to leave on the motorcycle. Meanwhile, Lonnie reveals Sam’s identity to Hale and Dunston, and claims he let Sam go because he did not want the state police arriving in town while they are conducting illegal activities. Elsewhere, Sam attracts the attention of a state trooper at a roadside diner, and the officer takes down his license plate number. As Sam hides in the woods, he is surrounded by police, but evades them by riding his motorcycle along a ridgeline. Worried about Clydie, Sam returns to the farm, where Dunston and his men have broken into the house and held her at gunpoint. As Mookie escapes out the window, he runs into Sam. Dunston knocks Lonnie unconscious, and beats Clydie until she signs Franklin Hale’s contract. Hale instructs a henchman to set fire to her house before they leave. However, Sam enters, puts out the fire, and kills Dunston in a fight. As Hale exits the house holding a gun to Clydie’s head, state troopers arrive and arrest him. Clydie begs Sam to flee, but he tells her and Mookie that he committed a crime, and must return to prison. He promises Clydie he will return, and as they embrace and profess their love, she vows to wait for him. When Lonnie handcuffs Sam and escorts him outside, Mookie hugs Sam goodbye. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.