RoboCop 3 (1993)

PG-13 | 105 mins | Drama, Science fiction, Adventure | 5 November 1993

Producer:

Patrick Crowley

Cinematographer:

Gary B. Kibbe

Editor:

Bert Lovitt

Production Designer:

Hilda Stark

Production Company:

Orion Pictures
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HISTORY

The film opens with a television commercial depicting a computer-generated model of “Delta City,” the “corporatocratic” society promoted by the fictional corporation, “Omni Consumer Products (OCP)."
       Five days before the 22 Jun 1990 release of RoboCop 2 (see entry), a 17 Jun 1990 LAT news item indicated that Orion Pictures was “optimistic” about continuing the franchise by registering titles for two prospective sequels with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). An 11 Sep 1990 HR production chart reported that filming of a third installment was expected to begin 3 Dec 1990.
       Although Nancy Allen, Angie Bolling, Robert Do'Qui, Mario Machado, and Felton Perry all reprised their roles from the previous two RoboCop films, the 2 Sep 1990 LAT reported that Peter Weller was unavailable to return as the title character after agreeing to make his directorial debut with Morning Glory (1993, see entry), in which he would also star. However, Weller also dropped out of that project to star in Naked Lunch (1991). A conflicting 28 Jan 1991 Var news item attributed Weller’s exit from the franchise to RoboCop 2’s “disappointing” reception. Shortly following the news of Weller’s departure, a 17 Oct 1990 HR brief stated that Orion decided to cancel production altogether—a claim that was immediately refuted by producer Patrick Crowley in the 19 Oct 1990 HR.
       Additional HR production charts suggested that the start date was repeatedly delayed until 4 Feb 1991. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, roughly 1,500 children from Los Angeles, CA; Chicago, IL; Detroit, MI; ... More Less

The film opens with a television commercial depicting a computer-generated model of “Delta City,” the “corporatocratic” society promoted by the fictional corporation, “Omni Consumer Products (OCP)."
       Five days before the 22 Jun 1990 release of RoboCop 2 (see entry), a 17 Jun 1990 LAT news item indicated that Orion Pictures was “optimistic” about continuing the franchise by registering titles for two prospective sequels with the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). An 11 Sep 1990 HR production chart reported that filming of a third installment was expected to begin 3 Dec 1990.
       Although Nancy Allen, Angie Bolling, Robert Do'Qui, Mario Machado, and Felton Perry all reprised their roles from the previous two RoboCop films, the 2 Sep 1990 LAT reported that Peter Weller was unavailable to return as the title character after agreeing to make his directorial debut with Morning Glory (1993, see entry), in which he would also star. However, Weller also dropped out of that project to star in Naked Lunch (1991). A conflicting 28 Jan 1991 Var news item attributed Weller’s exit from the franchise to RoboCop 2’s “disappointing” reception. Shortly following the news of Weller’s departure, a 17 Oct 1990 HR brief stated that Orion decided to cancel production altogether—a claim that was immediately refuted by producer Patrick Crowley in the 19 Oct 1990 HR.
       Additional HR production charts suggested that the start date was repeatedly delayed until 4 Feb 1991. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, roughly 1,500 children from Los Angeles, CA; Chicago, IL; Detroit, MI; Florida; Arizona; and Toronto, Canada, auditioned for the role of “Nikko.”
       Filming took place at more than twenty-five Atlanta locations, including: the Southern Bell building, which stood in for OCP Tower; Auburn Avenue; Georgia Avenue Church; Allied Cotton Mills; and Old Alabama Street. A warehouse twenty miles outside the city was converted into a sound stage for interior sets of the OCP boardroom, the church, and the subterranean resistance headquarters. According to the 24 May 1991 HR, principal photography concluded earlier that month after fourteen weeks. The production reportedly brought $10 million to the Georgia economy, since roughly eighty percent of the cast and crew were comprised of local Atlanta residents, including employees of Light Visions, who worked on the film for four months.
       Two years later, the 5 May 1993 HR announced that Orion had emerged from bankruptcy with ten films ready for distribution, and confidently touted RoboCop 3 as the project with the “greatest commercial potential.” However, the company was unable to find enough theaters available for a wide release on 16 Jul 1993, and opted to postpone the opening until 5 Nov 1993. That summer, the 16 Jun 1993 HR stated that illegal copies of the film were being sold for $10 apiece in a clothing and video store in the New York City borough of the Bronx. Although Columbia TriStar International had already released the picture in Japan, Korea, and the Philippines, time coding on the screen indicated that the tapes were duplicated from a domestic print used by the studio for editing.
       In the months leading up to the film’s delayed release, an advertisement in AMPAS library files announced that director Fred Dekker appeared at the 10 Oct 1993 Los Angeles Comic Book and Science Fiction Convention to present ten minutes of footage. The 27 Oct 1993 HR stated that the premiere was scheduled to take place 4 Nov 1993 during the Charleston International Film Festival in South Carolina.
       Despite the earlier LAT report that Orion preemptively registered the title for RoboCop 4, additional motion picture sequels did not move ahead following RoboCop 3’s tepid critical reception. However, the 5 May 1993 HR announced that Toronto’s Skyvision Entertainment had acquired the rights to develop a syndicated television program, which aired in 1994 as RoboCop: The Series. In 2001, Canada’s Space network also released a television miniseries titled RoboCop: Prime Directives, and the franchise continued with the animated cartoons series, RoboCop: The Animated Series (Syndication, 1988), and RoboCop: Alpha Commando (Syndication, 1998—1999). On 12 Feb 2014, Spyglass Entertainment Group and Sony Pictures released a “reboot” of the original RoboCop (see entry).
              Music credits include, “Special Thanks to Freeman Davies,” while end credits state: “The Producers wish to acknowledge the following for their assistance in the making of this motion picture: Aquarius Transformation; AV Technology Corporation; Bianchi International; Converse Athletic Shoes; Computer animated graphics created and designed by Light Visions, Atlanta, Georgia; Interact 6000 Series workstation with ‘I/Design’ Software; Jeffrey L. Presley; Dan Benator; ‘Future City’ skyline by Terrence M. Ward, Pacific Studios, Inc.; Delta City model executed by Real Model, Incorporated; Rollerblade™ skates and blade gear apparel provided by Rollerblade, Inc.; Norm Bielowicz and The Atlanta Film Commission; Albert G. Ruben & Company, Inc.; The Completion Bond Company; Norm Marshall & Associates, Inc. for the use of USA Today.” End credits conclude with the following dedication: “For James Green and John Green.” More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
11 Sep 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Oct 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Jan 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 May 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
5 May 1993
p. 1, 15.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Jun 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
27 Oct 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1993
p. 11, 16.
Los Angeles Times
17 Jun 1990
Calendar.
Los Angeles Times
2 Sep 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
5 Nov 1993
Calendar, p. 6.
New York Times
5 Nov 1993
Section C, p. 29.
Variety
28 Jan 1991.
---
Variety
15 Nov 1993
p. 31.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
An Orion® Pictures Release
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Dir, The 2d unit
1st asst dir, The 2d unit
2d asst dir, The 2d unit
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
2d asst cam
Steadicam op
Still photog
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Video supv
Video eng
Video cam
Dir of photog, The 2d unit
Cam op, The 2d unit
Cam op, The 2d unit
Cam op, The 2d unit
1st asst cam, The 2d unit
1st asst cam, The 2d unit
1st asst cam, The 2d unit
2d asst cam, The 2d unit
2d asst cam, The 2d unit
Gaffer, The 2d unit
Best boy, The 2d unit
Key grip, The 2d unit
Best boy, The 2d unit
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
1st asst art dir
Asst to the prod des
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Storyboard artist
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Video ed
Video ed
Addl ed by
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst props
Armorer
Const coord
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Gang boss
Lead carpenter
Scenic chargeman
Lead scenic
Standby painter
Prop master, The 2d unit
Set dresser, The 2d unit
Set dresser, The 2d unit
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Key costumer
Key costumer
Costumer, The 2d unit
Roboteam dresser, The 2d unit
Roboteam dresser, The 2d unit
MUSIC
Orig score
Mus ed
Scoring mixer
Synthesizer
Mus score contracting by
Mus score contracting by, Perc One, Inc.
Mus clearance by
Mus clearance by, for Fricon Entertainment
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Dial and Foley ed
Dial and Foley ed
Dial and Foley ed
Dial and Foley ed
Dial and Foley ed
Asst sd ed
ADR mixer
ADR mixer
ADR rec
Foley mixer
Foley rec
Foley walker
Foley walker
Sd re-rec by
Sd re-rec by
Sd re-rec by
Sd re-rec by
Sd re-rec by
Sd mixer, The 2d unit
ADR group coord, ADR Voice Services
ADR group coord
VISUAL EFFECTS
Robocop des & created by
Spec photographic eff
Spec photographic eff, VCE
Robo movement
Matte artist
Matte artist
Spec eff supv
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff
Matte cam
Tippett Company crew
Fx cam, Tippett Company crew
Fx cam, Tippett Company crew
Fx prod supv, Tippett Company crew
Cam asst, Tippett Company crew
Model maker, Tippett Company crew
Model maker, Tippett Company crew
Opticals, Tippett Company crew
Opticals, Image FX, Tippett Company crew
Computer graphics, Tippett Company crew
Computer graphics, Tippett Company crew
Moldmaker, Tippett Company crew
Armatures, Tippett Company crew
Armatures, Tippett Company crew
Eng, Tippett Company crew
Prod asst, Tippett Company crew
Prod asst, Tippett Company crew
Prod accountant, Tippett Company crew
Rob Bottin Productions crew
Project coord, Rob Bottin Productions crew
Project coord, Rob Bottin Productions crew
Roboteam chief, Rob Bottin Productions crew
Roboteam painter, Rob Bottin Productions crew
Roboteam painter, Rob Bottin Productions crew
Roboteam dresser, Rob Bottin Productions crew
Roboteam dresser, Rob Bottin Productions crew
Robocop prosthetic applied by, Rob Bottin Producti
VCE visual eff crew
Photographic eff, VCE visual eff crew
Photographic eff, VCE visual eff crew
Photographic eff, VCE visual eff crew
Photographic eff, VCE visual eff crew
Opt eff, VCE visual eff crew
Opt eff, VCE visual eff crew
Opt eff, VCE visual eff crew
Opt eff, VCE visual eff crew
Opt eff, VCE visual eff crew
Anim eff, VCE visual eff crew
Anim eff, VCE visual eff crew
Computer anim eff, VCE visual eff crew
Ed, VCE visual eff crew
Coord, VCE visual eff crew
Admin, VCE visual eff crew
Delta City and dream seq by
Art dir, Pacific Data Images
Digital eff spv, Pacific Data Images
Anim, Pacific Data Images
Anim, Pacific Data Images
Prod, Pacific Data Images
Prod, Pacific Data Images
Prod support, Pacific Data Images
Prod support, Pacific Data Images
Prod support, Pacific Data Images
Prod support, Pacific Data Images
Title and opticals by
MAKEUP
Key makeup
Makeup asst
Key hairstylist
Makeup/Hair, The 2d unit
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst to the prods
Asst to Mr. Dekker
Prod secy
Post prod supv
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Post prod asst
Post prod asst
Atlanta casting
Loc mgr
Asst loc
Asst loc
Extras casting
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Asst accountant
Post prod accountant
Post prod accountant
Financial representative
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Picture car coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Intern
Intern
Craft service
Asst craft service
Studio teacher
Police coord
Scr supv, The 2d unit
Prod supv, The 2d unit
Loc mgr, The 2d unit
Prod coord, The 2d unit
Transportation coord, The 2d unit
Prod asst, The 2d unit
Prod asst, The 2d unit
Prod asst, The 2d unit
Prod asst, The 2d unit
Prod asst, The 2d unit
Helicopter pilot
Helicopter pilot
Product placement services by
STAND INS
Stunt co-coord
Robocop stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
ANIMATION
Stop motion anim seq by
Dir by, Johnny Rehab commercial
Prod by, Johnny Rehab commercial
Anim, Johnny Rehab commercial
Anim, Johnny Rehab commercial
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Edward Neumeier & Michael Miner.
SONGS
"Here Comes Santa Claus," written by Gene Autry and Oakley Haldeman, performed by Gene Autry, courtesy of Western Music Publishing Company
"Blue Christmas," written by Billy Hayes and Jay Johnson, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of the RCA Records label of BMG Music
"He's So Strange," written by Charlotte Caffey, Jane Wiedlin, Leonard Phillips, Glen Custis, performed by The Go Go's, courtesy of I. R. S. Records
+
SONGS
"Here Comes Santa Claus," written by Gene Autry and Oakley Haldeman, performed by Gene Autry, courtesy of Western Music Publishing Company
"Blue Christmas," written by Billy Hayes and Jay Johnson, performed by Elvis Presley, courtesy of the RCA Records label of BMG Music
"He's So Strange," written by Charlotte Caffey, Jane Wiedlin, Leonard Phillips, Glen Custis, performed by The Go Go's, courtesy of I. R. S. Records
"Keep It To Yourself," written by Alan Mirikitani, performed by B. B. Chung King, courtesy of Windswept Pacific Entertainment Co.
+
DETAILS
Series:
Release Date:
5 November 1993
Premiere Information:
Charleston International Film Festival premiere: 4 November 1993
Los Angeles and New York openings: 5 November 1993
Production Date:
4 February--May 1991
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording Dolby Stereo SR™ in selected theatres
Color
Lenses
Filmed with Panavision® Cameras & Lenses
Prints
Prints by DeLuxe®
Duration(in mins):
105
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
31167
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Sometime in the future, the Japanese Kanemitsu Corporation announces its acquisition of Omni Consumer Products (OCP), saving the company from imminent bankruptcy. Despite its struggles, OCP remains in charge of overseeing the evacuation and demolition of Detroit, Michigan, in its efforts to transform the city into an independent “corporatocracy” called Delta City. In response to a spike in reactionary crime, OCP’s Paul McDaggett dispatches a special police unit of Urban Rehabilitation Officers, or “Rehabs,” to evict residents of the Cadillac Heights neighborhood. Among them are Keiko and David Halloran, who are forced onto a bus and separated from their daughter, Nikko. The girl escapes and is taken in by a group of anti-OCP revolutionaries. Nikko uses her knowledge of computers to reprogram the 209 Enforcement Droid guarding the entrance to the police armory while the rebels steal weapons and a prototype jetpack. Detroit police officer Anne Lewis pursues the fugitives’ getaway van through the city, but crashes her car into a civilian driver, leaving cyborg officer Alex Murphy, known as the “RoboCop,” to continue the chase. When members of the “Splatterpunk” street gang attack Officer Lewis’s team, RoboCop changes course to respond to their distress call. Concerned about the rising costs of fighting the resistance movement, OCP’s inefficient CEO wants RoboCop to become a permanent fixture on the Rehab squad, but McDaggett despises the android and vows to evacuate Cadillac Heights himself within four days. OCP employee Jeff Fleck visits the police station to ask Dr. Marie Lazarus, one of RoboCop’s creators, why the cyborg disobeyed his orders to follow the armory thieves. Dr. Lazarus reminds him that parts of Murphy’s human brain still control RoboCop’s functions. Fleck pushes ... +


Sometime in the future, the Japanese Kanemitsu Corporation announces its acquisition of Omni Consumer Products (OCP), saving the company from imminent bankruptcy. Despite its struggles, OCP remains in charge of overseeing the evacuation and demolition of Detroit, Michigan, in its efforts to transform the city into an independent “corporatocracy” called Delta City. In response to a spike in reactionary crime, OCP’s Paul McDaggett dispatches a special police unit of Urban Rehabilitation Officers, or “Rehabs,” to evict residents of the Cadillac Heights neighborhood. Among them are Keiko and David Halloran, who are forced onto a bus and separated from their daughter, Nikko. The girl escapes and is taken in by a group of anti-OCP revolutionaries. Nikko uses her knowledge of computers to reprogram the 209 Enforcement Droid guarding the entrance to the police armory while the rebels steal weapons and a prototype jetpack. Detroit police officer Anne Lewis pursues the fugitives’ getaway van through the city, but crashes her car into a civilian driver, leaving cyborg officer Alex Murphy, known as the “RoboCop,” to continue the chase. When members of the “Splatterpunk” street gang attack Officer Lewis’s team, RoboCop changes course to respond to their distress call. Concerned about the rising costs of fighting the resistance movement, OCP’s inefficient CEO wants RoboCop to become a permanent fixture on the Rehab squad, but McDaggett despises the android and vows to evacuate Cadillac Heights himself within four days. OCP employee Jeff Fleck visits the police station to ask Dr. Marie Lazarus, one of RoboCop’s creators, why the cyborg disobeyed his orders to follow the armory thieves. Dr. Lazarus reminds him that parts of Murphy’s human brain still control RoboCop’s functions. Fleck pushes the scientists to install a “micro-neuro barrier” that will block Murphy’s emotions from interfering with the android’s professional judgment, but Dr. Lazarus is unwilling to remove Murphy’s remaining humanity, and secretly destroys the device. While off duty, RoboCop and Officer Lewis attempt to save Nikko and the rebels from Rehab assault as they hide inside a church. McDaggett fatally shoots Officer Lewis and publicly incriminates RoboCop, but the cyborg carries his former partner’s body to the chancel and promises to avenge her death. Although Nikko invites RoboCop to join her and the resistance movement as they congregate in their underground hideout, the shootout with McDaggett has left him weak. Nikko searches for Dr. Lazarus and enlists her help repairing RoboCop’s failing efficiency systems. In the process, the scientist deletes the droid’s “Fourth Directive,” which removes any hesitation he may have turning against an OCP officer. Afterward, Nikko tells RoboCop about her parents. Accessing his internal database, he learns that the Hallorans were killed during evacuation, but decides to keep the information to himself. Meanwhile, Fleck commits suicide after he is fired for insulting Kanemitsu in front of Otomo, a robotic agent sent by the company’s owner to ensure RoboCop’s capture. Otomo descends to the tunnels below the city, hoping to eliminate the resistance movement himself. Back in the bunker, RoboCop suddenly remembers his promise to Officer Lewis and returns to the police station to destroy the Rehab offices. McDaggett, however, evades danger by receiving a tip from a rebel spy named Coontz. When RoboCop tracks him down in a decrepit hotel, McDaggett jumps out the window and flees in an armored Rehab van. RoboCop follows in a borrowed car until he is forced to brake for a group of children playing in the street. Coontz returns to the bunker and exposes himself as a double agent, followed by a team of Rehabs, who kill several rebels, including their leader, Bertha. As Dr. Lazarus is taken into Rehab custody, Nikko escapes through an air vent. McDaggett summons additional police forces to evacuate Cadillac Heights, but many officers denounce OCP’s corruption and walk out on the job. As a result, the Rehabs enlist Splatterpunks to increase their strength, while the former Detroit Police officers team up with the remaining rebels. RoboCop returns to the now-demolished underground bunker and meets Otomo, who dismembers his arm with a Katana sword. RoboCop replaces the missing limb with the barrel of an automatic weapon and blows off Otomo’s head. Above ground, the OCP CEO attempts to stop McDaggett from opening fire on city police officers, but the power-hungry Rehab leader holds the CEO at gunpoint and carries on with his plans. Once she finds Dr. Lazarus’s containment cell, Nikko uses her personal computer to broadcast footage from the prison security camera. Before escaping, Dr. Lazarus makes an impassioned statement to the people of Detroit, exposing the Rehabs’ lies and OCP’s corruption. Meanwhile, RoboCop uses the prototype jetpack to launch an aerial attack on the ensuing street battle between the Rehabs and the resistance. He breaks into OCP headquarters to arrest McDaggett for Officer Lewis’s murder, but two identical Otomo androids enter the room and knock RoboCop to the ground. Just then, Nikko and Dr. Lazarus arrive and reprogram the Otomo robots to destroy each other instead. When McDaggett reveals they were rigged to self-destruct, RoboCop grabs Nikko and Dr. Lazarus and uses his jetpack to propel them to safety, leaving McDaggett to die in the explosion. After arriving to survey the war-torn streets, Mr. Kanemitsu fires OCP’s CEO, turns to RoboCop, and bows. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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