Sleepless in Seattle (1993)

PG | 100 mins | Romantic comedy | 25 June 1993

Director:

Nora Ephron

Producer:

Gary Foster

Cinematographer:

Sven Nykvist

Editor:

Robert Reitano

Production Designer:

Jeffrey Townsend

Production Company:

TriStar Pictures
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HISTORY

According to an interview with screenwriter Jeff Arch in the 11 Jul 1993 LAT, Arch was inspired to write Sleepless in Seattle after seeing an infomercial for motivational speaker Anthony Robbins. Arch ordered Robbins’s audiotapes and, in Jan 1990, flew to La Jolla, CA, to attend one of his seminars. The following month, Arch began writing the script, which he sold to TriStar Pictures in May 1990. An article in the 28 Jun 1993 Austin American Statesman described producer Gary Foster’s “bumpy two-year stretch” trying to get the film made. David S. Ward was hired to rewrite Arch’s script, which was said to contain little comedy, as noted in the 5 Apr 1992 LAT. Larry Atlas also provided rewrites that were “thrown out entirely.” Nora Ephron, who claimed the original script “wasn’t a comedy at all… It was a simple, empty movie,” was brought on to rewrite Ward’s version. Ephron initially took the job because she needed cash and was looking for a quick paycheck.
       The film was originally slated to shoot in Vancouver, British Columbia, as noted in an 11 Jan 1991 Vancouver Sun brief, with actor Dennis Quaid to star. The following year, the 25 Mar 1992 Seattle Post-Intelligencer noted rumors that Garry Marshall would direct the picture with Julia Roberts starring. In the interim, Nick Castle had been attached to direct; however, Castle left the project over “creative differences,” according to a 3 Mar 1992 DV item, as did Marshall and Roberts. A 15 Apr 1992 Newsday item announced that Nora Ephron would direct. Shortly after, Tom Hanks and ... More Less

According to an interview with screenwriter Jeff Arch in the 11 Jul 1993 LAT, Arch was inspired to write Sleepless in Seattle after seeing an infomercial for motivational speaker Anthony Robbins. Arch ordered Robbins’s audiotapes and, in Jan 1990, flew to La Jolla, CA, to attend one of his seminars. The following month, Arch began writing the script, which he sold to TriStar Pictures in May 1990. An article in the 28 Jun 1993 Austin American Statesman described producer Gary Foster’s “bumpy two-year stretch” trying to get the film made. David S. Ward was hired to rewrite Arch’s script, which was said to contain little comedy, as noted in the 5 Apr 1992 LAT. Larry Atlas also provided rewrites that were “thrown out entirely.” Nora Ephron, who claimed the original script “wasn’t a comedy at all… It was a simple, empty movie,” was brought on to rewrite Ward’s version. Ephron initially took the job because she needed cash and was looking for a quick paycheck.
       The film was originally slated to shoot in Vancouver, British Columbia, as noted in an 11 Jan 1991 Vancouver Sun brief, with actor Dennis Quaid to star. The following year, the 25 Mar 1992 Seattle Post-Intelligencer noted rumors that Garry Marshall would direct the picture with Julia Roberts starring. In the interim, Nick Castle had been attached to direct; however, Castle left the project over “creative differences,” according to a 3 Mar 1992 DV item, as did Marshall and Roberts. A 15 Apr 1992 Newsday item announced that Nora Ephron would direct. Shortly after, Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan were set to co-star, as reported in the 29 Apr 1992 DV. Hanks and Ryan had formerly collaborated on Joe Versus the Volcano (1990, see entry).
       In the 23 May 1993 LAT, Nora Ephron credited Jeff Arch with the motif of the 1957 film, An Affair to Remember (see entry), a favorite of Arch’s mother, which in turn was based on the 1939 film Love Affair (see entry). Ephron showed An Affair to Remember to actor Tom Hanks during rehearsals, and the actor reportedly found it laughable. In Jul 1993, around the same time Sleepless in Seattle was released in theaters, Warren Beatty and new wife Annette Bening were set to begin shooting a remake of the 1939 Love Affair. Beatty and Bening’s film, also titled Love Affair, was released in 1994 (see entry).
       Principal photography commenced between 11 and 15 Jul 1992, according to various DV production charts. Filming took place in Seattle, WA; Chicago, IL; Baltimore, MD; and New York City. A 15 Aug 1992 Orange County Register item listed the budget as $25 million and stated that night filming for the past month in Seattle had been disturbing residents’ sleep.
       According to an item in the 6 Aug 1992 Toronto Star, Tom Hanks’s wife, Rita Wilson, beat out several other actresses to play his sister. The item also stated that Hanks lost twenty pounds for the role, after having gained as many for A League of Their Own (1992, see entry).
       A 10 Sep 1992 Chicago Tribune article erroneously described Hanks’s character as an accountant in the Equitable Building, and Ryan’s character as a Chicago Tribune reporter who moves to Baltimore, MD, after being jilted by a series of boyfriends. In early Sep 1992, three days of filming in Chicago took place at Wrigley Field, O’Hare Airport, and on North Michigan Avenue. The production moved to Baltimore, where locations included the Baltimore Sun headquarters, as noted in a 12 Sep 1992 Baltimore Sun item. Baltimore filming concluded on 17 Sep 1992. Production wrapped one week later, on 25 Sep 1992, in New York City, according to the 2 Oct 1992 Austin American Statesman.
       A 2 Jul 1993 LAT item noted that a January research screening led to good word-of-mouth and positive publicity in Premiere magazine, Redbook, Allure, and Movieline. Initially slated for 26 Mar 1993 release, the film was delayed to avoid competition with Indecent Proposal (1993, see entry). According to Nora Ephron, TriStar’s marketing team presented the film as “an underdog.” It was offered as “counter-programming” to summer “blockbuster” films such as The Last Action Hero and Jurassic Park (1993, see entries). The same strategy had been used successfully with When Harry Met Sally… (1989, see entry), a romantic comedy written by Ephron and starring Meg Ryan.
       Sneak previews took place in 750 theaters on 19 Jun 1993, as stated in the 2 Jul 1993 LAT, which cited a final budget of $27 million. The film premiered two nights later, on 21 Jun 1993, at the Loews Fine Arts Cinema in New York City, with a party at the Plaza Hotel, as noted in the 23 Jun 1993 Newsday. A 23 Jun 1993 Los Angeles, CA, premiere raised $2.5 million for a recently formed fundraising arm of the Motion Picture Television Fund, designed to “provide care to the entertainment community.” The event was said to have raised the most money of any benefit premiere in history.
       On 25 Jun 1993, Sleepless in Seattle was released on an estimated 1,500 screens, according to the 22 Jun 1993 LAT. The $17.2 million opening-weekend box-office gross marked the largest opening for a romantic comedy, to date. A 5 Jul 1993 LAT article credited the film’s broad appeal to its lack of violence and “good, clean happy ending,” calling it “a PG poster child and a parent’s dream.” By late Oct, the film had grossed $120,604,912, according to the 26 Oct 1993 DV box-office chart.
       A 23 May 1994 LAT item reported that the soundtrack version of “When I Fall In Love,” by Celine Dion and Clive Griffin, received the second annual Association of Independent Music Publishers (AIMP) Music Award for best film song.
       The floating home on Lake Union in Seattle, which served as the residence of “Sam Baldwin,” became a tourist attraction as a result of the film. A 29 Sep 1994 NYT article reported that the four-bedroom, 2,000-square-foot house, built atop a 40-by-68-foot raft, recently sold for $560,000.
       According to a 4 Mar 2009 LAT brief, a Broadway musical version of Sleepless in Seattle was in development. A 4 Jun 2013 LAT article stated that Stephen Sondheim turned down the project, and two composer/lyricists were briefly involved before Ben Toth and Sam Forman came on board. The musical, with a book written by Jeff Arch, premiered 2 Jun 2013 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena, CA.
       The film was ranked #10 on AFI’s 2008 list of Top 10 Romantic Comedies, and #45 on AFI’s 2002 list 100 Years…100 Passions. It was nominated for the following Academy Awards: Best Writing (Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen), and Best Music, Original Song (“A Wink And A Smile” by Marc Shaiman and Ramsey McLean).
       End credits include the following: “Clips from ‘An Affair to Remember’ courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation; Clip from ‘Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve’ courtesy of dick clark productions inc.; Major League Baseball trademarks licensed by Major League Baseball Properties, Inc.”; “Special thanks to: Washington State Film Commission, Christine Lewis; Seattle Mayor’s Office, Mayor Norm Rice, Donna James; New York Mayor’s Office of Film, Theatre & Broadcasting; Tiffany & Co., New York; Tiffany & Co. Windows by Gene Moore; Empire State Building and Helmsley-Spear, Inc.; Athenian Inn; Nike; Chicago Film Office; Baltimore City Film Commission, Jay Schlosberg Cohen; Citizens of Baltimore, Maryland; The Baltimore Sun.” More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Austin American Statesman
2 Oct 1992
Weekend, p. 6.
Austin American Statesman
28 Jun 1993
Section B, p. 8.
Baltimore Sun
12 Sep 1992
Section D, p. 2.
Chicago Tribune
10 Sep 1992
p. 1.
Daily Variety
3 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
24 Mar 1992.
---
Daily Variety
29 Apr 1992.
---
Daily Variety
7 Aug 1992.
---
Daily Variety
4 Sep 1992.
---
Daily Variety
18 Sep 1992.
---
Daily Variety
26 Oct 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
5 Apr 1992
Calendar, p. 22.
Los Angeles Times
23 May 1993
Calendar, p. 25.
Los Angeles Times
22 Jun 1993
Section D, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1993
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1993
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
2 Jul 1993
Calendar, p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
5 Jul 1993
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
11 Jul 1993
Calendar, p. 26.
Los Angeles Times
23 May 1994
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
4 Mar 2009
Section D, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
4 Jun 2013
Section D, p. 1.
New York Times
25 Jun 1993
p. 10.
New York Times
29 Sep 1994
Section C, p. 12.
Newsday
15 Apr 1992
p. 11.
Newsday
23 Jun 1993
p. 11.
Orange County Register
15 Aug 1992
Section A, p. 2.
Seattle-Post Intelligencer
25 Mar 1992
Section B, p. 1.
The Vancouver Sun
11 Jan 1991
Section D, p. 1.
Toronto Star
6 Aug 1992
Section C, p. 8.
Variety
21 Jun 1993
p. 41.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
TriStar Pictures Presents
A Gary Foster Production
A Nora Ephron Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITERS
Scr
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Cam intern
Steadicam op
2d unit dir of photog
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging best boy
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
2d unit dir of photog, Baltimore crew
2d asst cam, Baltimore crew
Steadicam op, Baltimore crew
Chief lighting tech, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir, Seattle/Chicago
Art dir, Baltimore/New York
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Illustrator
Storyboard artist
Asst art dir, New York crew
FILM EDITORS
Post prod supv
1st asst film ed
2d asst film ed
2d asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Key set dresser
Key set dresser
Prop master
Prop master
Chargeman scenic artist
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Greensman
Leadman, Chicago crew
Standby painter, Chicago crew
Set dec, Baltimore crew
Standby painter, Baltimore crew
Set dec, New York crew
Leadman, New York crew
Standby scenic artist, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Key costumer
Costumer
Costumer, Chicago crew
Costumer, Baltimore crew
Costumer, New York crew
MUSIC
Mus comp and adpt by
Mus supv
Mus supv
Mus prod by
Mus consultant
Asst mus ed
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst ADR ed
Asst ADR ed
Apprentice sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Post prod facilities
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cable
Standby sd, New York crew
Cableman, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des by
Titles des by
Spec eff coord
Main title seq and visual eff prod by
End title seq prod by
Visual eff supv, New York crew
MAKEUP
Key make-up artist
Meg Ryan's make-up
Key hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Prod consultant
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod accountant
Asst prod accountant
Post prod accountant
Scr supv
Unit pub
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Helicopter pilot
WesCam aerial provided by
Casting assoc
Seattle casting by
Seattle casting by
Casting asst
Casting asst
Extras casting
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation capt
Asst to Ms. Ephron
Asst to Ms. Ephron
Asst to Mr. Foster
Asst to Ms. Obst
Asst to Mr. Hanks
Asst to Mr. Hanks
Asst to Ms. Ryan
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Post prod asst
Post prod asst
Studio teacher
Studio teacher
Craft service
Catering
Medic
Prod coord, Chicago crew
Asst loc mgr, Chicago crew
Transportation coord, Chicago crew
Craft service, Chicago crew
Asst prod coord, Chicago crew
Prod asst, Chicago crew
Prod coord, Baltimore crew
Asst loc mgr, Baltimore crew
Transportation coord, Baltimore crew
Craft service, Baltimore crew
Asst prod coord, Baltimore crew
Prod asst, Baltimore crew
Prod asst, Baltimore crew
Prod asst, Baltimore crew
Prod asst, Baltimore crew
Prod supv, New York crew
Prod coord, New York crew
Loc mgr, New York crew
Extras casting, New York crew
Teamster capt, New York crew
Asst prod coord, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"When I Fall In Love," written by Edward Heyman and Victor Young, produced by David Foster, performed by Celine Dion and Clive Griffin, courtesy of Epic Records
"Take Me Out To The Ballgame," written by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer
"In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning," written by David Mann and Bob Hilliard, performed by Carly Simon, courtesy of Arista Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
"When I Fall In Love," written by Edward Heyman and Victor Young, produced by David Foster, performed by Celine Dion and Clive Griffin, courtesy of Epic Records
"Take Me Out To The Ballgame," written by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer
"In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning," written by David Mann and Bob Hilliard, performed by Carly Simon, courtesy of Arista Records, Inc.
"As Time Goes By," written by Herman Hupfeld, performed by Jimmy Durante, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Back In The Saddle Again," written by Gene Autry and Ray Whitley, performed by Gene Autry, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Sleigh Ride/Jingle Bells," "Sleigh Ride" written by Leroy Anderson and Mitchell Parish, "Jingle Bells" written by J. Pierpont, performed by Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"An Affair To Remember," written by Harry Warren, Harold Adamson and Leo McCarey, courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
"The Proposal," written by Hugo W. Friedhofer, courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
"We Wish You A Merry Christmas," courtesy of Capitol/OGM Production Music
"Bye Bye Blackbird," written by Ray Henderson and Mort Dixon, performed by Joe Cocker, courtesy of Muscadet Productions, Inc. and A & M Records, Inc.
"Over The Rainbow," written by Harold Arlen and E. Y. Harburg, performed by Ray Charles, courtesy of Ray Charles Enterprises, Inc.
"A Wink And A Smile," written by Marc Shaiman and Ramsey McLean, produced by Marc Shaiman and Harry Connick, Jr., performed by Harry Connick, Jr., courtesy of Columbia Records
"Jeepers Creepers," written by Harry Warren and Johnny Mercer
"Auld Lang Syne," performed by Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians, courtesy of MCA Records
"Empire State Montage," written by Hugo W. Friedhofer, courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
"Stardust," written by Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish, performed by Nat King Cole, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from CEMA Special Markets
"Stand By Your Man," written by Billy Sherrill and Tammy Wynette, performed by Tammy Wynette, courtesy of Epic Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Makin' Whoopee," written by Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn, performed by Dr. John, featuring Rickie Lee Jones, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"A Kiss To Build A Dream On," written by Bert Kalmer, Harry Ruber and Oscar Hammerstein II, performed by Louis Armstrong, courtesy of MCA Records
"Make Someone Happy," written by Betty Comden, Adolph Green and Jule Styne, performed by Jimmy Durante, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 June 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 25 June 1993
Production Date:
mid July--25 September 1992
Copyright Claimant:
TriStar Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 August 1993
Copyright Number:
PA640653
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
100
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32238
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Recent widower Sam Baldwin decides he and his eight-year-old son, Jonah, need a change. They uproot from Chicago, Illinois, to a floating home on Lake Union in Seattle, Washington. On Christmas Eve, Jonah calls into the “You and Your Emotions” radio show hosted by Dr. Marcia Fieldstone, and tells her his Christmas wish: a new wife for his grieving father. Fieldstone urges the boy to put Sam on the phone. Meanwhile, in Baltimore, Maryland, Annie Reed listens to the show on her way to visit her fiancé Walter’s family, and is brought to tears when Sam reveals the deep love he had for his wife, and the magic he felt when first holding her hand. Learning that Sam suffers from insomnia, Fieldstone refers to him as “Sleepless in Seattle.” After the holiday, Annie returns to work at the Baltimore Sun. At a staff meeting, her co-worker, Becky, mentions that 2,000 women called in to Dr. Fieldstone’s radio show to get “Sleepless in Seattle’s” number. Annie admits she was also swept up by Sam’s story, and Becky suggests she write about it. On New Year’s Eve, Annie celebrates with Walter, who suggests a Valentine’s Day trip to New York City. Meanwhile, in Seattle, Sam puts Jonah to bed, then daydreams a conversation with his late wife, Maggie. He returns to work on a house he is designing, and is embarrassed to learn that his client, Claire, heard him on the “You and Your Emotions” show. Soon, Sam receives letters from many interested women, sent to him via Dr. Marcia Fieldstone. Jonah excitedly reads the letters, but ... +


Recent widower Sam Baldwin decides he and his eight-year-old son, Jonah, need a change. They uproot from Chicago, Illinois, to a floating home on Lake Union in Seattle, Washington. On Christmas Eve, Jonah calls into the “You and Your Emotions” radio show hosted by Dr. Marcia Fieldstone, and tells her his Christmas wish: a new wife for his grieving father. Fieldstone urges the boy to put Sam on the phone. Meanwhile, in Baltimore, Maryland, Annie Reed listens to the show on her way to visit her fiancé Walter’s family, and is brought to tears when Sam reveals the deep love he had for his wife, and the magic he felt when first holding her hand. Learning that Sam suffers from insomnia, Fieldstone refers to him as “Sleepless in Seattle.” After the holiday, Annie returns to work at the Baltimore Sun. At a staff meeting, her co-worker, Becky, mentions that 2,000 women called in to Dr. Fieldstone’s radio show to get “Sleepless in Seattle’s” number. Annie admits she was also swept up by Sam’s story, and Becky suggests she write about it. On New Year’s Eve, Annie celebrates with Walter, who suggests a Valentine’s Day trip to New York City. Meanwhile, in Seattle, Sam puts Jonah to bed, then daydreams a conversation with his late wife, Maggie. He returns to work on a house he is designing, and is embarrassed to learn that his client, Claire, heard him on the “You and Your Emotions” show. Soon, Sam receives letters from many interested women, sent to him via Dr. Marcia Fieldstone. Jonah excitedly reads the letters, but Sam prefers to meet a woman on his own terms. In Baltimore, Annie barges in on her brother, Dennis, at his office, and admits to having fantasies about a stranger in Seattle. She is relieved when Dennis debunks the idea of fate, and confesses that he too had “cold feet” before his wedding. Later, Annie and Becky watch the 1957 film, An Affair to Remember, in which two lovers agree to meet at the top of the Empire State Building. Becky looks on as Annie writes a letter to Sam, then crumples it up and tosses it. Unable to shake her obsession, she hires a private detective to perform a background check and snap Sam’s photograph. Jonah receives Annie’s letter in the mail. Convinced she is the right woman for his father, he reads the letter aloud, noting that Annie’s favorite baseball player, Brooks Robinson, is also Sam’s favorite. Sam argues that Baltimore is too far away, and leaves for a dinner date with an interior designer named Victoria. Jonah interrupts the date by calling Sam to tell him that Annie wants to meet at the top of the Empire State Building on Valentine’s Day. Sam reprimands his son for interrupting him, and hangs up. Later, Sam introduces Victoria to Jonah, who vehemently dislikes her. The boy spies them kissing and calls into the “You and Your Emotions” show in a panic. Becky calls to alert Annie that Jonah is back on the show, rousing both Annie and Walter from a deep sleep. Annie sneaks downstairs and turns on the radio. Later, Jonah shares Annie’s letter with his girl friend, Jessica, who agrees that Annie is the perfect match for Sam. She encourages Jonah to write back, and they draft a letter together. Meanwhile, Annie tells Becky she wants to write a story about Sam, and Becky authorizes her to travel to Seattle for “research.” When Annie gets off the airplane, she happens to pass Sam and Jonah, who are at the airport to drop off Victoria. Sam notices Annie and stares at her as she passes. She arrives at Sam’s house just as he and Jonah paddle off in a boat. Annie follows them to a beach, but cannot muster the courage to approach them. The next day, she finds them at a marina, but stops short when she sees Sam and Jonah embracing Sam’s visiting sister, Suzy. Mistaking Suzy for Victoria, Annie is crestfallen. Sam notices her in the middle of the road and says “Hello.” Annie responds, but is nearly hit by a car. Back in Baltimore, she tells Becky about the encounter, telling her, “All I could say was ‘hello.’” Becky recalls the heroine in An Affair to Remember saying the same line, and tells Annie it must be a sign. Annie receives Jonah’s letter, in which the boy, posing as his father, agrees to meet her in New York. Becky confesses to sending Annie’s crumpled-up letter. However, having seen Sam embracing another woman, Annie no longer wants to pursue him. When Sam continues to refuse to go to New York, Jonah decides to go on his own. He enlists the help of Jessica, whose parents own a travel agency. She books him on a flight and they pool their money for taxi fare. Having recommitted herself to the idea of marrying Walter, Annie goes to meet him in New York. While registering for wedding gifts, Walter gives Annie his mother’s engagement ring. It is just what she would have picked, and she praises Walter’s predictability. On Valentine’s Day morning, Sam packs for a weekend getaway with Victoria. The babysitter arrives, but Jonah is nowhere to be found. Sam goes to Jessica’s house, and Jessica informs him that Jonah is on a flight to New York. The panicked Sam rushes to the airport and gets on the next flight to New York. That evening, Annie goes for drinks with Walter. Noticing the Empire State Building in clear view, she returns his mother’s ring, and tells him about Sam. Walter remains even-keeled and tells Annie that he never wants to be “settled for.” The Empire State Building windows light up red, forming a heart, and Annie decides it is a sign. She hails a taxi to the Empire State Building, where Jonah has spent the day looking for her, but gets caught in traffic. Sam finally catches up to Jonah on the observation deck, and is relieved to find him unharmed. Minutes later, Annie coaxes a security guard to let her up to the observation deck after closing, but finds it empty. She notices Jonah’s abandoned backpack, and rifles through it just as Sam and Jonah come back for it. Annie and Sam lock eyes. She introduces herself, and he takes her hand. Admiring each other in silence, Annie and Sam board the elevator with the contented Jonah. Finally, Annie tells Sam it is nice to meet him. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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