What's Love Got to Do with It (1993)

R | 129 mins | Drama, Biography | 9 June 1993

Director:

Brian Gibson

Writer:

Kate Lanier

Producers:

Doug Chapin, Barry Krost

Cinematographer:

Jamie Anderson

Production Designer:

Stephen Altman

Production Company:

Touchstone Pictures
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HISTORY

The following title card appears before opening credits: “The lotus is a flower that grows in the mud. The thicker and deeper the mud, the more beautiful the lotus blooms. This thought is expressed in the Buddhist chant: Nam myoho renge kyo.” The final scene depicts “Ike Turner” walking out of the Ritz nightclub as “Tina Turner” performs, accompanied by the title card: “Ike Turner was later arrested on drug-related charges. He was convicted and served time in a California State Prison.” Footage of present-day, real-life Tina Turner performing to a packed arena ensues, with the following titles superimposed: “‘What’s Love…?’” hit number one. Tina’s first solo album won four Grammy Awards including Record of the Year. Tina has become one of the world’s top recording artists. Her tours continue to break concert attendance records worldwide.” The concert footage was tacked onto the film one month before release, according to an 8 Jun 1993 LADN item. Director Brian Gibson wanted to reward the audience with “the treat of seeing” the real-life Tina, and although the footage threatened to undermine Angela Bassett’s performance, it was said to boost audience response in test screenings.
       An 18 Jul 1988 New York item announced that Walt Disney’s Touchstone Pictures optioned film rights to Tina Turner’s 1986 autobiography, I, Tina, co-written by former Rolling Stone journalist Kurt Loder. Howard Ashman was hired to adapt the script, with the first draft due in Jun 1989. Ashman wrote two drafts before his death in Mar 1991. Producers attempted to replace him with Kurt Loder, but Loder did not feel equipped to write the story as upbeat as ... More Less

The following title card appears before opening credits: “The lotus is a flower that grows in the mud. The thicker and deeper the mud, the more beautiful the lotus blooms. This thought is expressed in the Buddhist chant: Nam myoho renge kyo.” The final scene depicts “Ike Turner” walking out of the Ritz nightclub as “Tina Turner” performs, accompanied by the title card: “Ike Turner was later arrested on drug-related charges. He was convicted and served time in a California State Prison.” Footage of present-day, real-life Tina Turner performing to a packed arena ensues, with the following titles superimposed: “‘What’s Love…?’” hit number one. Tina’s first solo album won four Grammy Awards including Record of the Year. Tina has become one of the world’s top recording artists. Her tours continue to break concert attendance records worldwide.” The concert footage was tacked onto the film one month before release, according to an 8 Jun 1993 LADN item. Director Brian Gibson wanted to reward the audience with “the treat of seeing” the real-life Tina, and although the footage threatened to undermine Angela Bassett’s performance, it was said to boost audience response in test screenings.
       An 18 Jul 1988 New York item announced that Walt Disney’s Touchstone Pictures optioned film rights to Tina Turner’s 1986 autobiography, I, Tina, co-written by former Rolling Stone journalist Kurt Loder. Howard Ashman was hired to adapt the script, with the first draft due in Jun 1989. Ashman wrote two drafts before his death in Mar 1991. Producers attempted to replace him with Kurt Loder, but Loder did not feel equipped to write the story as upbeat as Touchstone wanted, and passed on the assignment. Kate Lanier, who receives sole screenwriting credit, reportedly wrote seventeen drafts. At some point during development, William Mastrosimone, who is not credited onscreen, was hired to give Ike Turner’s character more depth.
       Taylor Hackford was initially attached to direct, according to an item in the 27 Aug 1992 DV. Hackford was replaced by Mario Van Peebles, who intended to play “Ike Turner,” but was later deemed “too handsome” for the role, as stated in a 25 Aug 1993 Time Out (London) article. When Van Peebles left the project to direct Posse (1993, see entry), Touchstone Pictures offered the job to Brian Gibson, who was committed to direct The Thing Called Love (1993, see entry) for Paramount Pictures. As reported in the 27 Aug 1992 DV, Touchstone offered Gibson a more lucrative pay-or-play deal, which Gibson asked Paramount to match. However, by the time Paramount agreed, Gibson had already committed to What’s Love Got to Do with It, which received a green light from Touchstone in the fall of 1992.
       The three top contenders to play Tina Turner were Halle Berry, Robin Givens, and Angela Bassett. As noted in the 25 Aug 1993 Time Out (London), Bassett received Tina Turner’s blessing and won the role after a successful screen test in which she performed “Proud Mary.” In the month leading up to production, Bassett worked with a dialect coach, a singing coach, a choreographer, and a personal trainer, who helped her achieve Tina Turner’s muscular physique through a rigorous diet and weight-lifting program. Although there was talk of using a dance-and-leg double for Bassett, she performed all of her own dancing, as noted in the 9 Jun 1993 Long Beach Press-Telegram.
       The film compressed events from Tina Turner’s life, and omitted some, including the birth of her first son, who was fathered by one of Ike Turner’s bandmates, in 1958. The song “River Deep, Mountain High” was less successful in the U.S. than portrayed in the film; however, it did “create a sensation in England” that prompted Ike and Tina’s invitation to tour with the Rolling Stones in 1969. Although Touchstone wanted to omit Ike’s common-law wife, Lorraine, Tina Turner fought for her to be included. She also fought for scenes depicting “past life” experiences, which she had discovered in 1977, in which she and Ike ruled Egypt in 1500 B.C. as Queen Hatshepsut, and brother Thutmose, II. She believed the past-life scenes would explain why she stayed with her violent husband for so long. Although director Brian Gibson was a Buddhist like Tina Turner, and believed in reincarnation, he did not feel the past-life connection provided an adequate “psychological underpinning” to the story. Instead, Gibson shaped the narrative around a theme of desertion, as both Tina and Ike had been abandoned in different ways before getting together.
       Principal photography began 9 Dec 1992, as stated in the 26 Jan 1993 HR production chart. Filming took place in Los Angeles and Sacramento, CA. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Los Angeles locations included Ike and Tina Turner’s former residence in Baldwin Hills, which was still decorated with original furniture and wallpaper; the downtown State and Embassy Theatres; the Palace nightclub in Hollywood, which stood in for The Ritz; the Warner Grand Theatre in San Pedro, CA, where Apollo Theater scenes were filmed; Hollywood’s Star Search Theatre, which doubled as the set of a television variety show; and a ballroom in the Park Plaza Hotel, which stood in for the Venetian Room at the San Francisco, CA, Fairmont Hotel. Tina Turner visited the set often, contributed original wardrobe pieces she and the Ikettes wore onstage, and gave input on how Angela Bassett was dressed. In one scene, as noted in the 16 May 1993 LAT, Turner determined that Bassett’s shoes were incorrect and bought a pair of zebra-striped shoes to replace them.
       An item in the 8 Jun 1993 LADN cited a final production cost of $19 million.
       What’s Love Got to Do with It opened on 9 Jun 1993 in New York City and Los Angeles, where it played at the Pacific Cinerama Dome and AMC Century 14, according to 11 May 1993 and 10 Jun 1993 LAT items. Two days later, the release expanded to ten major cities, including Atlanta, GA; Chicago, IL; and San Francisco.
       To capitalize on the release of both the film and soundtrack album from Virgin Records, Tina Turner launched a concert tour on 6 Jun 1993 in Reno, NV. Her collaboration on the film also led to a three-picture development deal with Disney.
       Ike Turner had little contact with the filmmakers, other than signing over rights to his story. Between 1990 and 1991, he spent eighteen months in prison on cocaine charges. Disney discouraged Brian Turner from talking to him, and the two only met once, when Ike Turner showed up unannounced on a day of filming at the Turners’ former Baldwin Hills home. During his short visit to the set, Ike Turner reportedly signed autographs and gave Laurence Fishburne tips on how to walk like him. Around the time of the film’s release, he spoke to various news and television outlets, including Vanity Fair, The Whoopi Goldberg Show, and the LAT, which published an interview with him on 24 Jun 1993, in which he stated that the film and Tina Turner’s book were “full of lies,” and insisted that he only ever slapped Tina, except during their last fight in which he used his fist. In a conflicting claim, he told Vanity Fair’s Maureen Orth that he had not beaten Tina “any more than you been hit by your guy.” A 1 Jul 1993 LAT item noted that Ike Turner and his manager held a press conference on 29 Jun 1993, to refute the way he was portrayed in the film and challenge Tina Turner to an “Ike versus Tina musical duel,” offering her $2.5-$3.5 million (according to various sources) to participate. As stated in the 5 Jul 1993 Publishers Weekly, the press conference was also arranged for Ike Turner to announce a “major book/TV-movie/record-deal” in the works for his own autobiography, but no such deals had been made. Ike’s proposed book was referred to in various sources as That’s What Love’s Got to Do with It, and I, Ike: I Got Hit, Too!
       Tina Turner’s voice was used in place of Angela Bassett’s for all musical numbers. The Virgin Records soundtrack, released on 15 Jun 1993, included three new songs by Tina Turner, her re-recordings, as heard in the film, of the Ike & Tina Turner hits, “Proud Mary,” “Nutbush City Limits,” and “It’s Gonna Work Out Fine,” and a cover version of “Disco Inferno,” as noted in 7 Mar 1993 and 13 Jun 1993 LAT items.
       End credits include the statement: “The producers wish to thank: Chuck Lanham, Rhonda Graam, The Palace in Hollywood.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Aug 1992
p. 3, 10.
Daily Variety
7 Jun 1993
p. 4, 29.
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jan 1993.
---
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jun 1993
p. 8, 29.
Long Beach Press-Telegram
9 Jun 1993.
---
Los Angeles Daily News
8 Jun 1993
p. 16.
Los Angeles Times
7 Mar 1993
Calendar, p. 65.
Los Angeles Times
11 May 1993.
---
Los Angeles Times
16 May 1993
Calendar, p. 5.
Los Angeles Times
9 Jun 1993
p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jun 1993
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
13 Jun 1993
Calendar, p. 59.
Los Angeles Times
24 Jun 1993
Calendar, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jul 1993
Calendar, p. 2.
New York
18 Jul 1988.
---
New York Times
9 Jun 1993
p. 15.
New York Times
27 Jun 1993
Section A, p. 5.
People
5 Oct 1992.
---
Publishers Weekly
5 Jul 1993.
---
Screen International
25 Sep 1992.
---
Time Out (London)
25 Aug 1993
pp. 21-22.
Variety
14 Jun 1993
p. 54, 67.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
The Kings of Rhythm:
The Revue:
[and]
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures presents
a Krost/Chapin production
a Brian Gibson film
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures Distribution, Inc.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
Addl 2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Rigging gaffer
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Cameras by
Cranes and dollies by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
Apprentice ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Leadman
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
On-set dresser
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Standby painter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Asst cost supv
Key costumer
Key costumer
On-set costumer
On-set costumer
MUSIC
Orig score
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Mus scoring mixer
Orch and cond by
Orch and cond by
Supv copyist
Orch contractor
Guitar solos by
Mus playback op
Supv on-cam mus
Songs rec by
Songs mixed by
Songs mixed by
Song prod coord
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Cableman
Supv sd ed
Supv ADR ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
Rerec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Titles & opticals
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Makeup des by
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Hair des by
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Prod supv
Prod coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Asst to Mr. Chapin
Asst to the prods
Asst to Brian Gibson
Asst to exec prod
Asst to Ms. Bassett
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Tech adv
Consultant
Tina & Ike vocal coach
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Extras casting
ADR voice casting
Head wrangler
Animals provided by
Asst to Mr. Carlin
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
Prod and distributed on
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the book I, Tina by Tina Turner and Kurt Loder (New York, 1986).
SONGS
"Tina's Wish," written by Ike Turner and Tina Turner, published by Striped Horse Music and Zebra Discorde Music Group, Inc., performed by Tina Turner
"A Fool In Love," written by Ike Turner, used by permission of EMI Unart Catalog Inc., performed by Tina Turner
"It's Gonna Work Out Fine," written by Sylvia McKinney and Rose McCoy, published by Ben-Ghazi Enterprises, Inc., performed by Tina Turner and Laurence Fishburne
+
SONGS
"Tina's Wish," written by Ike Turner and Tina Turner, published by Striped Horse Music and Zebra Discorde Music Group, Inc., performed by Tina Turner
"A Fool In Love," written by Ike Turner, used by permission of EMI Unart Catalog Inc., performed by Tina Turner
"It's Gonna Work Out Fine," written by Sylvia McKinney and Rose McCoy, published by Ben-Ghazi Enterprises, Inc., performed by Tina Turner and Laurence Fishburne
"Rock Me Baby," written by B. B. King and Joe Josea, published by Powerforce Music, c/o NEM and Sounds of Lucille Inc., performed by Tina Turner
"Proud Mary," written by John C. Fogerty, published by Jondora Music, performed by Tina Turner and Laurence Fishburne
"Shake A Tail Feather," written by Verlie Rice, Otis Hayes and Andre Williams, published by Vapac Music Publishing Co., performed by Tina Turner
"Disco Inferno," written by Leroy Green and Tyrone G. Kersey, published by Six Strings Music, performed by Tina Turner
"Nutbush City Limits," written by Tina Turner, used by permission of EMI Blackwood Music Inc. and EMI Unart Catalog Inc., performed by Tina Turner
"Rocket 88," written by Jackie Brenston, published by Unichappell Music, Inc., performed by Laurence Fishburne
"(Darlin) You Know I Love You," written by B. B. King and Jules Taub, published by Powerforce Music, c/o NEM and Sounds of Lucille Inc., performed by Tina Turner and Laurence Fishburne - recordings produced by Chris Lord-Alge, Tina Turner and Roger Davies, Mr. Fishburne's vocals produced by D. A. Carlin. "This Little Light Of Mine," traditional, arranged and produced by D. A. Carlin
"(We're Gonna) Jump For Joy," written by Joe Turner, published by Unichappell Music, Inc., performed by Big Joe Turner, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Those Lonely Lonely Nights," written by John Vincent, published by Music Corporation of America, Inc., under license from Northern Songs, performed by Johnny "Guitar" Watson, courtesy of Flair/Virgin Records America, Inc./Ace Records Ltd./Blues Interactions, Inc.
"Love, Oh Careless Love," written by Joe Turner, published by Unichappell Music, Inc., performed by Big Joe Turner, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Do Wah Diddy Diddy," written by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich, published by Trio Music Co., Inc. and Steeplechase Music, performed by Manfred Mann, courtesy of EMI Records Group, by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"I Only Want To Be With You," written by Mike Hawker and Ivor Raymonde, published by Chappell & Co., performed by Dusty Springfield, courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets, a division of PolyGram Group Distribution, Inc.
"I Don't Wanna Fight," written by Steve DuBerry, Lulu and Billy Lawrie, published by Chrysalis Songs and Famous Music, performed by Tina Turner, produced by Chris Lord-Alge and Roger Davies
"I Want That Girl," written and performed by Charles Martin Inouye, published by Bagus Music and Wet Ink Music
"River Deep, Mountain High," written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich and Phil Spector, performed by Ike & Tina Turner, produced by Phil Spector, published by Mother Bertha Music, Inc. and Trio Music Co., Inc., courtesy of A&M Records, Inc. and Phil Spector Records, Inc., by arrangement with ABKCO Music & Records, Inc.
"Summertime Blues," written by Eddie Cochran and Jerry Capehart, published by Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Corp., performed by Blue Cheer, courtesy of PolyGram Special Markets, a division of PolyGram Group Distribution, Inc.
"Frankenstein," written and performed by Edgar Winter, courtesy of Windswept Pacific Entertainment Co. and Monigan Productions
"Move It," written by David Lindup, published by Bruton/APM, courtesy of Associated Production Music
"I Might Have Been Queen," written by Jeanette Obstoj, Rupert Hine and James West-Oram, used by permission EMI Blackwood Music Inc. and Colgems-EMI Music Inc., Island Music, c/o PolyGram International Publishing Co., performed by Tina Turner, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc., by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets
"Why Must We Wait Until Tonight?," written by Byran Adams and Robert John Lange, published by Almo Music Corp./Badams Music and Zomba Enterprises, Inc., performed by Tina Turner, produced by Bryan Adams and Robert John "Mutt" Lange
"What's Love Got To Do With It," written by Terry Britten and Graham Lyle, published by Warner/Chappell Music, Inc. and Rondor Music Publishing, performed by Tina Turner, courtesy of Capitol Records, Inc., by arrangement with CEMA Special Markets.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
I, Tina
Release Date:
9 June 1993
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 9 June 1993
Production Date:
began 9 December 1992
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures, an accepted alternative of the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
18 June 1993
Copyright Number:
PA620031
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Prints
Prints by Technicolor®
Duration(in mins):
129
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
32503
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

As a child, Anna Mae Bullock is abandoned by her mother, Zelma, in Nutbush, Tennessee, where she is raised by her grandmother. In 1958, teenaged Anna Mae is invited to live with her estranged older sister, Alline, and her mother, Zelma, in St. Louis, Missouri. Sensing Anna Mae’s resentment for being left behind, Zelma explains that the girl was too young to understand the troubles with her father at the time. Now single, Zelma invites a date over to the house and demands privacy. Alline, who is on her way to her bartending job at the Club Royal, begrudgingly takes her little sister along. The Ike Turner Revue performs, and Anna Mae becomes infatuated with frontman Ike Turner. Alline warns her sister that Ike is a womanizer, but Anna Mae is undeterred. She practices singing at home, and on another visit to the nightclub, volunteers herself when Ike invites women from the audience to commandeer his microphone. Anna Mae impresses the frontman with her distinctive voice and stage presence. After the performance, a band member named Spider takes her to a diner, but Ike intervenes and sends Spider out for cigarettes. Ike compliments Anna Mae’s “flair,” and tells her she sings like a man in a woman’s body. He laments previous partnerships with musicians who deserted him after becoming famous, and invites Anna Mae to become his new partner. Zelma and Alline are disbelieving when Anna Mae shares the news, but Ike allays their suspicions by showing up at the house and vowing to make Anna Mae rich. Ike writes songs for her to record and quickly assembles a group of female backup singers, “The Ikettes.” He buys ... +


As a child, Anna Mae Bullock is abandoned by her mother, Zelma, in Nutbush, Tennessee, where she is raised by her grandmother. In 1958, teenaged Anna Mae is invited to live with her estranged older sister, Alline, and her mother, Zelma, in St. Louis, Missouri. Sensing Anna Mae’s resentment for being left behind, Zelma explains that the girl was too young to understand the troubles with her father at the time. Now single, Zelma invites a date over to the house and demands privacy. Alline, who is on her way to her bartending job at the Club Royal, begrudgingly takes her little sister along. The Ike Turner Revue performs, and Anna Mae becomes infatuated with frontman Ike Turner. Alline warns her sister that Ike is a womanizer, but Anna Mae is undeterred. She practices singing at home, and on another visit to the nightclub, volunteers herself when Ike invites women from the audience to commandeer his microphone. Anna Mae impresses the frontman with her distinctive voice and stage presence. After the performance, a band member named Spider takes her to a diner, but Ike intervenes and sends Spider out for cigarettes. Ike compliments Anna Mae’s “flair,” and tells her she sings like a man in a woman’s body. He laments previous partnerships with musicians who deserted him after becoming famous, and invites Anna Mae to become his new partner. Zelma and Alline are disbelieving when Anna Mae shares the news, but Ike allays their suspicions by showing up at the house and vowing to make Anna Mae rich. Ike writes songs for her to record and quickly assembles a group of female backup singers, “The Ikettes.” He buys the women dresses, choreographs their dances, and arranges a tour. One night, after a party at his house, Anna Mae stays behind. Ike flirts with her and tells her to stay in the spare bedroom. Anna Mae is awakened at gunpoint by Ike’s common-law wife, Lorraine, whose face is swollen. Lorraine hobbles out of the room and into her sons’ bedroom, where she shoots herself. She is taken to a hospital, and the traumatized Anna Mae awaits Ike’s return. The next day, Ike comes home with news that Lorraine will live. He tells Anna Mae that Lorraine stopped believing in him. Anna Mae promises she would never leave Ike, and the two make love. Soon, the new Ike Turner Revue goes on tour. After a good first performance, Ike rewards Anna Mae by allowing her to record his new song, “Fool In Love.” Anna Mae is in the hospital, having just given birth to Ike's son, when she first hears the song on the radio. The announcer credits it to “Ike and Tina,” and she realizes Ike has given her a stage name without telling her. The doctor diagnoses Anna Mae with severe anemia and extends her hospital stay to three weeks. However, Ike has arranged several shows he refuses to cancel. Late at night, he and his bandmate, Fross, smuggle Anna Mae and the baby out of the hospital. Anna Mae wants to stay, but Ike lures her with an engagement ring and the promise of a “quickie” wedding in Mexico. In August 1960, the Ike and Tina Turner Revue is scheduled to play at the famed Apollo Theatre in New York City. Before the show, however, Anna Mae tells Ike she is exhausted and fears her voice will fail if she tries to sing. She begs him for a rest, but he berates her and forces her to perform. Onstage, she hesitates before singing. In the silence, Ike kisses her, and the crowd applauds as Anna Mae sheds a tear. As she begins to sing, her voice goes in and out, but she perseveres. Back in St. Louis, Ike receives a large check from a record company. At a party, Anna Mae notices him flirting with an Ikette and becomes jealous, but Zelma instructs her to ignore it, insisting that Ike is a good man. Before the Turners move to California, Lorraine drops her two sons off at their doorstep. Anna Mae takes in the abandoned children, and becomes pregnant with a second of her own. By 1964, Ike has developed a cocaine habit and regularly beats Anna Mae, whose star quality is something he simultaneously depends on and resents. After performing their new song, “Shake A Tail Feather,” on a television variety show, Anna Mae is approached by record producer Phil Spector, who wants to record a new song with only her. Anna Mae collaborates with Spector on “River Deep, Mountain High,” stoking Ike’s jealousy. At a diner, while the song plays on the radio, the cocaine-addled Ike demands cake and insists that Anna Mae eat it. When she declines, he shoves the cake in her face, and Anna Mae throws water at him. An Ikette named Jackie intervenes, and Ike hits her. Jackie leaves, and warns Anna Mae that she will end up dead unless she leaves, too. In the middle of the night, Anna Mae attempts to flee with her children, but Ike tracks them down at a bus stop and drags them back home. Ike and Tina go on tour with the Rolling Stones, and continue to tour heavily through 1974. One night, Ike does cocaine and partygoers watch as Anna Mae records her song, “Nutbush City Limits.” Ike loses his temper, accuses Anna Mae of forgetting the words she wrote, and sends everyone away. He beats and rapes her in the recording booth. Later, in a dressing room before a show, Anna Mae has a swollen, black eye. She babbles nonsensically, and the Ikettes call for help when they discover she has taken an overdose of pills. Jackie visits her at the hospital and offers her a place to stay. Anna Mae returns home to find Ike partying with other women, while a muralist paints a pornographic image on one of their walls. She takes refuge at Jackie’s house, where the former Ikette, now a Buddhist, teaches her a Buddhist chant. Anna Mae finds solace in chanting and continues the practice at home. She and Ike travel to another city for a show. She tries to separate from him at the airport, but he shoves her in the back of a limousine and beats her. Anna Mae fights back, and the two arrive at their hotel covered in blood. Anna Mae regards her disfigured face in the bathroom mirror, and flees the hotel room after Ike passes out. With nothing but a few cents and a Mobil gas card, she arrives at another hotel and begs the manager for a room. In 1977, she sues Ike for divorce, and wins the right to keep her stage name, “Tina Turner.” In 1980, after performing as Tina Turner to a lackluster crowd at a San Francisco, California, hotel, she meets manager Roger Davies, who agrees to help revive her career. Anna Mae wants to shed her rhythm and blues background and become a rock and roll singer. Sometime later, she prepares for a comeback show at the Ritz nightclub in New York City. Her son, Ike, Jr., comes to her house with a bloodied face, and warns her that Ike is in a rage over the show. Ike, Jr. believes his father will kill Anna Mae to keep her from performing again. At the Ritz, Ike breaks into Anna Mae’s dressing room and threatens her with a gun, but she refuses to be afraid. She goes onstage, and the defeated Ike leaves during her opening song, “What’s Love Got To Do With It.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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