Other Men's Women (1931)

65 or 70-71 mins | Melodrama | 17 January 1931

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HISTORY

FD noted that the film was first released under the title The Steel Highway but opened in New York as Other Men's Women . MPH reviewed it as The Steel Highway . Although there is a copyright statement onscreen for Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., the film was not registered for copyright. Maude Fulton is credited onscren twice, first on a title card reading " Other Men's Women by Maude Fulton," then again with the credit "Screen adaptation by Maude ... More Less

FD noted that the film was first released under the title The Steel Highway but opened in New York as Other Men's Women . MPH reviewed it as The Steel Highway . Although there is a copyright statement onscreen for Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc., the film was not registered for copyright. Maude Fulton is credited onscren twice, first on a title card reading " Other Men's Women by Maude Fulton," then again with the credit "Screen adaptation by Maude Fulton." More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
26 Apr 31
p. 10.
Motion Picture Herald
4 Oct 30
p. 31.
New York Times
20 Apr 31
p. 16.
Variety
22 Apr 31
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Warner Bros. Vitaphone Talking Picture
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Story and adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
General mus dir
Vitaphone Orch cond
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Steel Highway
Release Date:
17 January 1931
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
65 or 70-71
Length(in feet):
6,403
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Bill, a railroad engineer, has no intention of getting married and settling down. When Marie, a waitress in the depot cafe, reminds him that they are supposed to get married that weekend, he pretends to have something else to do. She is angry and breaks off their relationship, much to Bill's relief. When Bill is thrown out of his boardinghouse for drunkenness and non-payment of rent, Jack, his partner, brings him home. Bill thinks that Jack's wife Lily will hate him because he is drunk, but she welcomes him and makes him comfortable. For a time the three of them are happy together, but one day, while Jack goes out for ice cream, Bill and Lily acknowledge that they love one another. Bill wants to tell Jack right away, but Lily is afraid to hurt him. Bill moves out, without saying why, although Jack suspects the worst. That night at work, Jack and Bill argue over Lily, and in the ensuing fight, Jack is blinded. When the river floods, Bill decides to try to dam it by driving his train engine over the bridge. He knows it will mean his death, but he cannot bear to cause Jack any more grief. Jack learns of his plans and takes his place, believing that his blindness makes him a burden to Lily. Bill tries to stop him, but Jack drives the train onto the bridge and dies. Months later, Lily returns from her home town. Now that their love is possible, Bill happily returns to ... +


Bill, a railroad engineer, has no intention of getting married and settling down. When Marie, a waitress in the depot cafe, reminds him that they are supposed to get married that weekend, he pretends to have something else to do. She is angry and breaks off their relationship, much to Bill's relief. When Bill is thrown out of his boardinghouse for drunkenness and non-payment of rent, Jack, his partner, brings him home. Bill thinks that Jack's wife Lily will hate him because he is drunk, but she welcomes him and makes him comfortable. For a time the three of them are happy together, but one day, while Jack goes out for ice cream, Bill and Lily acknowledge that they love one another. Bill wants to tell Jack right away, but Lily is afraid to hurt him. Bill moves out, without saying why, although Jack suspects the worst. That night at work, Jack and Bill argue over Lily, and in the ensuing fight, Jack is blinded. When the river floods, Bill decides to try to dam it by driving his train engine over the bridge. He knows it will mean his death, but he cannot bear to cause Jack any more grief. Jack learns of his plans and takes his place, believing that his blindness makes him a burden to Lily. Bill tries to stop him, but Jack drives the train onto the bridge and dies. Months later, Lily returns from her home town. Now that their love is possible, Bill happily returns to work. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.