Jerry Maguire (1996)

R | 135 mins | Comedy-drama, Romance | 13 December 1996

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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HISTORY

Jerry Maguire was ranked 10th on AFI's 2008 10 Top 10 list of the ten greatest sports films of all time. The lines "Show me the money!" and "You had me at 'hello'" were ranked 25th and 52nd, respectively, on AFI's 2005 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes list of the 100 top movie quotes of all ... More Less

Jerry Maguire was ranked 10th on AFI's 2008 10 Top 10 list of the ten greatest sports films of all time. The lines "Show me the money!" and "You had me at 'hello'" were ranked 25th and 52nd, respectively, on AFI's 2005 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes list of the 100 top movie quotes of all time. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
13 Dec 1996
p. 1.
New York Times
13 Dec 1996
p. 1.
Variety
9 Dec 1996
p. 101.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 December 1996
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 6 Dec 1996; Los Angeles opening: 11 Dec 1996
Copyright Claimant:
TriStar Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
27 January 1997
Copyright Number:
PA814030
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
135
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Southern California, thirty-five-year-old Jerry Maguire experiences a moral crisis over the greed and dishonesty that drive his industry, sports management. He writes a lengthy mission statement, charting out a new path for himself and other agents at his firm, Sports Management International (SMI). The manifesto goes over poorly, and Jerry learns of his firing from Bob Sugar, his protégé at the firm. When they hear that Jerry is leaving SMI, all but one of his clients choose to stay at the firm. Jerry retains only Rod Tidwell, a wide receiver for the National Football League’s (NFL) Arizona Cardinals, who is looking for a new $10-million contract. On his way out of the office, Jerry announces to the SMI staff that he will launch his own firm and invites others to join him. An idealistic assistant named Dorothy Boyd takes him up on the offer. Jerry tries to win back his most high-profile client, quarterback Frank “Cush” Cushman, by visiting the young player at home. Although Cushman initially agrees to go with Jerry, he is swayed by his father to sign with Bob Sugar, instead. With his personal life also in upheaval, Jerry ends his engagement to Avery Bishop. He begins spending time outside work with Dorothy, a single mother, and her son Ray, and the two begin a romantic relationship. As Jerry struggles to establish his new business, Dorothy considers a more secure job offer that would move her to San Diego, California. Jerry urges her to stay with him and spontaneously proposes marriage. The two are wed in Dorothy’s backyard. Jerry devotes himself to landing Rod Tidwell a better contract. Tensions rise between the two as Rod ... +


In Southern California, thirty-five-year-old Jerry Maguire experiences a moral crisis over the greed and dishonesty that drive his industry, sports management. He writes a lengthy mission statement, charting out a new path for himself and other agents at his firm, Sports Management International (SMI). The manifesto goes over poorly, and Jerry learns of his firing from Bob Sugar, his protégé at the firm. When they hear that Jerry is leaving SMI, all but one of his clients choose to stay at the firm. Jerry retains only Rod Tidwell, a wide receiver for the National Football League’s (NFL) Arizona Cardinals, who is looking for a new $10-million contract. On his way out of the office, Jerry announces to the SMI staff that he will launch his own firm and invites others to join him. An idealistic assistant named Dorothy Boyd takes him up on the offer. Jerry tries to win back his most high-profile client, quarterback Frank “Cush” Cushman, by visiting the young player at home. Although Cushman initially agrees to go with Jerry, he is swayed by his father to sign with Bob Sugar, instead. With his personal life also in upheaval, Jerry ends his engagement to Avery Bishop. He begins spending time outside work with Dorothy, a single mother, and her son Ray, and the two begin a romantic relationship. As Jerry struggles to establish his new business, Dorothy considers a more secure job offer that would move her to San Diego, California. Jerry urges her to stay with him and spontaneously proposes marriage. The two are wed in Dorothy’s backyard. Jerry devotes himself to landing Rod Tidwell a better contract. Tensions rise between the two as Rod demands more effort from Jerry in his deal-making, and Jerry accuses Rod of playing without heart. Jerry and Dorothy fail to connect in their new marriage, and she suggests that they separate. Jerry travels to Arizona for a pivotal “Monday Night Football” game that stands to advance the Cardinals to the NFL playoffs. Rod is injured after making the game-winning touchdown. As he lies unconscious, Jerry rushes onto the field, phoning Rod’s wife, Marcee, in the process. The crowd rejoices when Rod finally regains consciousness and picks himself up without the help of a trainer. Other athletes look on admiringly as Rod and Jerry embrace after the game; their close personal relationship proves that Jerry has become the kind of agent described in his mission statement. Jerry returns home to Dorothy and wins her back with a speech, which he ends by saying, “You complete me.” With his marriage saved, he goes on to broker an $11.2-million renewal contract between Rod and the Arizona Cardinals, which Rod learns about during a live television interview. Afterward, Jerry notices Ray’s natural ability to throw a baseball and is excited by the young boy’s potential. +

GENRE
Sub-genre:
Sports


Subject
Subject (Major):

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.