Ray (2004)

PG-13 | 152 mins | Biography, Drama | 29 October 2004

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
You may also like these titles from the AFI Catalog of Feature Films, the most authoritative documentation of the First 100 Years of American filmmaking.
Full page view
HISTORY

Ray was ranked 99th on AFI's 2006 100 Years...100 Cheers list of the 100 most inspiring films of all ... More Less

Ray was ranked 99th on AFI's 2006 100 Years...100 Cheers list of the 100 most inspiring films of all time. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
29 Oct 2004
p. 1.
New York Times
29 Oct 2004
p. 1.
Variety
20 Sep 2004
p. 55, 67.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus comp
DETAILS
Release Date:
29 October 2004
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 29 Oct 2004
Copyright Claimant:
Unchain My Heart Louisiana, LLC
Copyright Date:
28 December 2004
Copyright Number:
PA1255620
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
152
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Musician Ray Charles, born Ray Charles Robinson, shoots to stardom in the 1950s as a pianist and singer with a unique sound incorporating rhythm and blues, gospel music, rock and roll, country, jazz, and orchestral pop. Growing up in the 1930s in Northern Florida, Ray experienced two tragedies: first, his younger brother drowned to death; and second, Ray lost his eyesight due to glaucoma. Despite those setbacks, and growing up as an African American in the segregated South, Ray pursues his ambitions with a workaholic zeal. He tours the “Chitlin’ Circuit,” a network of African-American-friendly nightclubs throughout the South, the East Coast and parts of the Midwest. At first he sings in the crooner style, but his music and vocals develop into a raucous hybrid of many genres. He struggles with a temporary addiction to heroin, and regularly cheats on his wife, Bea. One of his affairs, with backup singer Margie Hendrix, leads to onstage tension when Ray refuses to leave his wife for Margie. While he gains critical and commercial success, he also advocates for himself as a shrewd and sometimes mistrusting businessman. This causes rifts with some bandmates, his road manager Jeff Brown, and other employees. However, Ray unflaggingly honors his musical genius by continuing to write hit songs and innovate his ... +


Musician Ray Charles, born Ray Charles Robinson, shoots to stardom in the 1950s as a pianist and singer with a unique sound incorporating rhythm and blues, gospel music, rock and roll, country, jazz, and orchestral pop. Growing up in the 1930s in Northern Florida, Ray experienced two tragedies: first, his younger brother drowned to death; and second, Ray lost his eyesight due to glaucoma. Despite those setbacks, and growing up as an African American in the segregated South, Ray pursues his ambitions with a workaholic zeal. He tours the “Chitlin’ Circuit,” a network of African-American-friendly nightclubs throughout the South, the East Coast and parts of the Midwest. At first he sings in the crooner style, but his music and vocals develop into a raucous hybrid of many genres. He struggles with a temporary addiction to heroin, and regularly cheats on his wife, Bea. One of his affairs, with backup singer Margie Hendrix, leads to onstage tension when Ray refuses to leave his wife for Margie. While he gains critical and commercial success, he also advocates for himself as a shrewd and sometimes mistrusting businessman. This causes rifts with some bandmates, his road manager Jeff Brown, and other employees. However, Ray unflaggingly honors his musical genius by continuing to write hit songs and innovate his sound. +

GENRE
Genres:


Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.