The Parallax View (1974)

R | 101-103 mins | Drama | 1974

Director:

Alan J. Pakula

Producer:

Alan J. Pakula

Cinematographer:

Gordon Willis

Editor:

John W. Wheeler

Production Designer:

George Jenkins

Production Companies:

Gus Productions, Inc., Harbor Productions, Inc., Doubleday Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

On 11 Jan 1971, Publisher’s Weekly announced that Loren Singer’s novel, The Parallax View (1970) was being developed into a screenplay.
       A Var news item on 21 Jun 1972 reported that Alan J. Pakula had been contracted to direct and that production was set to begin at the end of 1972. According to HR production charts on 13 Apr 1973, principal photography for the film began 2 Apr 1973 in Washington State and Los Angeles, ... More Less

On 11 Jan 1971, Publisher’s Weekly announced that Loren Singer’s novel, The Parallax View (1970) was being developed into a screenplay.
       A Var news item on 21 Jun 1972 reported that Alan J. Pakula had been contracted to direct and that production was set to begin at the end of 1972. According to HR production charts on 13 Apr 1973, principal photography for the film began 2 Apr 1973 in Washington State and Los Angeles, CA.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
10 Jun 1974
p. 4696.
Daily Variety
5 Apr 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Apr 1973
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jun 1973
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jun 1974
p. 3, 22.
LAHExam
26 Jun 1974.
---
LAHExam
1 Jul 1974.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Jun 1974
Calendar, p. 30.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Jun 1974
p. 1.
New York Times
20 Jun 1974
p. 47.
Newsweek
1 Jul 1974
pp. 74-75.
Publisher's Weekly
11 Jan 1971.
---
Publisher's Weekly
2 Aug 1971.
---
Time
8 Jul 1974
p. 60.
Variety
21 Jun 1972.
---
Variety
19 Jun 1974
p. 16.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
+

NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Co-Starring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Stacy Keach Sr.
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Joseph Di Reda
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
Featuring
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
SOUND
Sd mixer
Re-rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Asst to the dir
Casting
Casting
Prod secy
Consultant des
STAND INS
Stunt coord
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Parallax View by Loren Singer (Garden City, 1970).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Buttons and Bows," by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans
"Blue Hawaii," by Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin
"Moon River," by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer
+
SONGS
"Buttons and Bows," by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans
"Blue Hawaii," by Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin
"Moon River," by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer
"Wild and Woolly West," by Paul Francis Webster and Sammy Fain.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
1974
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 June 1974
Los Angeles opening: 26 June 1974
Production Date:
2 April--late June 1973 in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
19 April 1974
Copyright Number:
LP43730
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
101-103
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
23909
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Senator Charles Carroll is assassinated and a Congressional investigation rules out government conspiracy by determining that the murder was carried out by a lone gunman. The committee blames the press for sensationalizing the story. Three years later, a witness to the assassination, investigative journalist Joseph “Joe” Frady, is visited by Lee Carter, a television news reporter who was with him at the event. Terrified, Lee tells Frady that someone is trying to kill her, but Frady presumes she is trying to rekindle their past love affair. Lee believes that the six assassination witnesses, who reportedly died in accidents, were murdered and she is next. Frady claims only four people died of inconspicuous causes and, referring to the government report, he insists they saw nothing suspicious during the assassination. However, Frady is surprised to learn from Lee that two more witnesses recently died. Lee tells him that one of the men, Arthur Bridges, died while fishing in the town of Salmontail and that he was vacationing with Austin Tucker, another surviving witness who is also skeptical of the assassination. Despite Lee’s pleas, Frady refuses to help her find Tucker. Some time later, Lee dies of a drug overdose and the coroners report it as a suicide. Now compelled by Lee’s story, Frady meets with his friend Will, a former FBI agent, to acquire a false identification and an alias as a “hostile misfit.” Will gives him the identity of Richard Martin, a dubious man he once investigated, and Frady heads to Salmontail. At a bar, Frady impresses Sheriff L. D. Wicker by knocking out Red, Salmontail’s bullying ... +


Senator Charles Carroll is assassinated and a Congressional investigation rules out government conspiracy by determining that the murder was carried out by a lone gunman. The committee blames the press for sensationalizing the story. Three years later, a witness to the assassination, investigative journalist Joseph “Joe” Frady, is visited by Lee Carter, a television news reporter who was with him at the event. Terrified, Lee tells Frady that someone is trying to kill her, but Frady presumes she is trying to rekindle their past love affair. Lee believes that the six assassination witnesses, who reportedly died in accidents, were murdered and she is next. Frady claims only four people died of inconspicuous causes and, referring to the government report, he insists they saw nothing suspicious during the assassination. However, Frady is surprised to learn from Lee that two more witnesses recently died. Lee tells him that one of the men, Arthur Bridges, died while fishing in the town of Salmontail and that he was vacationing with Austin Tucker, another surviving witness who is also skeptical of the assassination. Despite Lee’s pleas, Frady refuses to help her find Tucker. Some time later, Lee dies of a drug overdose and the coroners report it as a suicide. Now compelled by Lee’s story, Frady meets with his friend Will, a former FBI agent, to acquire a false identification and an alias as a “hostile misfit.” Will gives him the identity of Richard Martin, a dubious man he once investigated, and Frady heads to Salmontail. At a bar, Frady impresses Sheriff L. D. Wicker by knocking out Red, Salmontail’s bullying deputy, and they strike up a friendship. Sheriff Wicker takes Frady to his home and tells him that Tucker left town, but Bridges’s drowning at the dam might not have been an accident. With the sheriff’s encouragement, Frady goes fishing at the dam, but when the sirens sound their warning and water is released, Sheriff Wicker aims his gun at Frady. As torrents of water rush toward them, Frady whips the sheriff with his fishing pole and they wrestle in the water. After struggling to shore and stealing the sheriff’s car, Frady returns to Sheriff Wicker’s house and discovers a briefcase containing psychological tests from the Parallax Corporation. While Deputy Red walks inside and receives news of the sheriff’s death, Frady escapes with the briefcase in a squad car. Deputy Red gives chase, but Frady crashes through a supermarket window and gets away on the back of a truck. Back in town, Frady tells his editor, Bill Rintels, about the assassination conspiracy. Rintels, however, suspects Frady has had an alcoholic relapse: The sheriff’s drowning was reported as an accident and there is no warrant for Frady’s arrest. Although Frady claims a cover-up, Rintels argues that the sheriff was trying to prevent Frady from reporting on a utilities scandal for which he was indicted. Frady counters that the Salmontail police could not have known he was a journalist because he used a false identity. Later, Frady consults with a psychological researcher about the Parallax Corporation tests and learns that they are devised to identify killers. When Frady asks for the forms to be filled out from a murderer’s perspective, the scientist has his case study, a convicted killer, complete the tests. At a café, Frady is approached by a stranger who takes him to Tucker. Although Tucker demands to know who put Frady on his trail and offers him $10,000 to leave him alone, Frady insists he is a writer working alone and refuses the bribe. Secluded on Tucker’s yacht, Tucker presents two images taken on the day of the assassination, one showing the witnesses who were killed and another of a waiter. As Frady stands at the bow, the boat explodes, but he escapes unharmed. Retuning to Rintels’s office, Frady finds an article reporting the deaths of three men in the accident and realizes that Rintels is the only person who knows he is alive. Rintels tells Frady that he will demand a reopening of the Senator Carroll investigation in the next day’s paper, but Frady asks Rintels to publish his obituary instead. He tells Rintels that the Parallax Corporation’s recruitment of assassins might be operating outside of the government, and he intends to infiltrate it as a potential killer. Living under an alias, Frady is visited by Jack Younger, a Parallax Corporation operative, who congratulates him on his impressive test scores and promises him a lucrative job opportunity. At a Parallax Corporation testing session, Frady is exposed to a montage of archetypal images and words about family, patriotism and self-identity. On his way out of the office, Frady recognizes the waiter from Tucker’s photographs. After observing the man pick up a briefcase and check it in at the airport, Frady boards the plane just before take off. As Frady surveys the cabin, he notices Senator Gillingham being briefed about an article that compares him to Senator Carroll. When Frady alerts the stewardess to the bomb by writing a message on a cocktail napkin, the plane lands and the passengers disembark before it explodes. Frady returns home to find Younger waiting for him and he is offered work in a company’s security department. Sometime later, Rintels is killed when the waiter from the assassination, disguised as a delivery boy, drops off a poisoned sandwich. Meanwhile, Younger tells Frady that he will be briefed on his first assignment the following day. Before Frady meets his new partner, however, he calls him under the guise of another Parallax operative and redirects him to Hawaii. After going back to Parallax headquarters to inform Younger that his partner never showed, Frady again sees the waiter from the assassination. Frady follows him to a convention center that is being prepared for a political rally. As candidate George Hammond rehearses, the Parallax assassin watches from the catwalk above and shoots him dead. Although Frady attempts to prevent the assassination, he is identified by onlookers as the killer and is shot point blank while running for the door. Later, a Congressional investigation reports that Frady was the lone gunman in the assassination and there is no evidence of government conspiracy. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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