Bridesmaids (2011)

R | 125 mins | Comedy | 2011

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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Director:

Paul Feig

Cinematographer:

Robert Yeoman

Production Designer:

Jefferson Sage

Production Company:

Apatow Productions
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HISTORY

Jon Hamm appears in the film uncredited as Annie’s casual sex partner, “Ted.” Additional scenes from Wilson Phillips’ performance at Lillian’s wedding, and sex tape footage involving the character “Megan,” play over credits at the end of the film. Film, television and video game clips used in the film are credited as follows: “ Cast Away courtesy of 20th Century Fox, all rights reserved; Cast Away licensed through Paramount Pictures; The Maury Show courtesy of NBCUniversal Television Distribution; Bulletstorm video game courtesy of People Can Fly.” End credits also contain “Special Thanks” to the following organizations: The State of California, California Film Commission, and Epic Games.
       According to production notes, Annie Mumolo and Kristen Wiig, who wrote and performed together with a comedy troupe called The Groundlings, started work on the screenplay in 2006. In a 9 Dec 2011 DV article, producer Judd Apatow explained that after Wiig played a small role in his 2007 film, Knocked Up (see entry), he approached her to work on a movie in which Wiig would have a starring role. Wiig then asked Mumolo to pitch their screenplay to Apatow. Apatow, Mumolo and Wiig sold the film to Universal as a pitch, according to DV , and spent the next several years collaborating on the script. Mumolo’s experiences as a bridesmaid in various weddings served as a foundation for the story. The writing process also involved filmed improvisation sessions between Wiig and Mumolo, which they later studied and mined for material. Apatow pushed the writers to work on the material into actual production, and, according to a 1 Dec 2011 ...

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Jon Hamm appears in the film uncredited as Annie’s casual sex partner, “Ted.” Additional scenes from Wilson Phillips’ performance at Lillian’s wedding, and sex tape footage involving the character “Megan,” play over credits at the end of the film. Film, television and video game clips used in the film are credited as follows: “ Cast Away courtesy of 20th Century Fox, all rights reserved; Cast Away licensed through Paramount Pictures; The Maury Show courtesy of NBCUniversal Television Distribution; Bulletstorm video game courtesy of People Can Fly.” End credits also contain “Special Thanks” to the following organizations: The State of California, California Film Commission, and Epic Games.
       According to production notes, Annie Mumolo and Kristen Wiig, who wrote and performed together with a comedy troupe called The Groundlings, started work on the screenplay in 2006. In a 9 Dec 2011 DV article, producer Judd Apatow explained that after Wiig played a small role in his 2007 film, Knocked Up (see entry), he approached her to work on a movie in which Wiig would have a starring role. Wiig then asked Mumolo to pitch their screenplay to Apatow. Apatow, Mumolo and Wiig sold the film to Universal as a pitch, according to DV , and spent the next several years collaborating on the script. Mumolo’s experiences as a bridesmaid in various weddings served as a foundation for the story. The writing process also involved filmed improvisation sessions between Wiig and Mumolo, which they later studied and mined for material. Apatow pushed the writers to work on the material into actual production, and, according to a 1 Dec 2011 LAT article, the food poisoning scene and the flight to Vegas arose from Apatow’s suggestions.
       According to a 29 Jan 2010 Var news item, James Bobin turned down an offer to direct Bridesmaids , instead signing on to direct The Muppets (2011, see entry). Director Paul Feig, who formerly collaborated with Judd Apatow on the television series Freaks and Geeks , was later hired.
       The film’s budget was $32.5 million, according to a 13 May 2011 LAT article. Production notes found in the AMPAS library files stated that southern California locations were used in place of Milwaukee and Chicago. In search of architecture to fit the “Midwestern worlds” of Bridesmaids , production designer Jefferson Sage commented, “Chicago is a beautiful, distinctive city architecturally, and restricted views of downtown L.A. feel like Chicago.” In addition to Los Angeles, locations in Oxnard, CA, were used for the highway scenes in which the character “Annie” traveled between Milwaukee and Chicago. Also according to production notes, Sherwood Country Club in Westlake, CA, served as the location for the engagement party, the tennis match, and some of the wedding scenes. Cholodecki’s, the jewelry shop where Annie works, was built on a stage.
       Production notes stated that costume designer Leesa Evans worked closely with Sage to coordinate color palettes and determine “which dress work[ed] with which set.” A 15 May 2011 LAT article stated that there were two distinct sets of bridal party dresses, one for the film and one for the poster. Evans explained in the article that the wedding dress and bridesmaids’ dresses used in the film were inspired by the character “Helen,” who organized the wedding and would have chosen “couture runway fashion that seems unbelievable, unwearable, hilarious yet still incredibly beautiful.” In contrast, the dresses used in the poster reflected “a more stereotype wedding” so that the actresses’ “edgy” demeanors stood in contast to what they were wearing.
       During production, according to a 1 Dec 2011 LAT article, “improvisation began in rehearsal and never stopped.” Mumolo stayed on the set throughout production to provide “pages of jokes.” Additional writers helped out on set, according to Feig, who stated that “we had a team of great writers behind us helping out. They transcribed and handed me jokes they thought of at the moment, then I’d feed ideas in.” Regarding the cast, producer Barry Mendel commented, “These are the strongest improvisational actors I’ve ever seen.”
       According to a 2 Dec 2011 HR interview with Paul Feig, the movie trailer for Bridesmaids was widely criticized. Feig commented that the trailer was difficult to create given the film’s tone, “both outrageous but also very emotionally real,” and that Universal focused on the “outrageous” with the first trailer. Ultimately, according to a 13 May 2011 LAT article, “the studio used multiple trailers for the film, including a red-band [Restricted] trailer, to garner favor with a broad range of demos.”
       The same LAT article reported that Bridesmaids was expected to realize between $15 and $17 million box-office dollars in the first weekend of its release. Surprisingly, it took in $24.4 million, according to a 16 May 2011 DV article, when it opened on 2,918 screens. Universal expected the film to gain a bigger audience in the weeks following, “based on positive word-of-mouth and a B+ CinemaScore rating.” Bridesmaids went on to best Sex and the City (2008, see entry), becoming “the top R-rated female comedy of all time domestically” and “Universal’s top R-rated comedy of all time,” replacing Apatow’s Knocked Up (2007, see entry). Seven months after its U.S. release, the film had grossed close to $170 million, according to a 15 Dec 2011 LAT article. A 1 Dec 2011 LAT article stated that the film had a worldwide gross of more than $280 million.
       Despite its eventual box office success, Bridesmaids opened to mixed reviews. Very positive reviews from LAT and NYT cited the refreshing take on female relationships, “liberating humor,” and Wiig’s performance as some of the film’s strong points. In a mixed review from HR , Todd McCarthy described Bridesmaids as “uneven, overly long, emotionally involving and discreetly ambitious.” Var panned the film, reviewing it after a screening at the South by Southwest Film Festival where an almost-finished cut was shown which, according to Feig, was final except for “soundtrack tweaking.” Var ’s reviewer Joe Leydon called the film “a sluggish, charmless misfire.”
       Jill Clayburgh appeared as Annie’s mother, “Judy,” in her final screen performance before her 5 Nov 2010 death.
       Universal was discussing a sequel to Bridesmaids , according to a 6 Jan 2012 National Post article, but Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo had not agreed to be involved. The article postulated that bonuses of $100,000 paid to the principal cast members were perhaps too low given the film’s financial success, and might have been the cause of Wiig and Mumolo’s refusal to participate in a sequel; however, Universal was willing “to move ahead…without the original stars.”
       AFI named Bridesmaids one of the top ten Movies of the Year. The Screen Actors Guild nominated the film for “Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture,” and Melissa McCarthy for “Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role.” The film was also nominated for Golden Globes for "Best Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical" and "Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical" for Kristen Wiig, and Academy Awards for "Best Actress in a Supporting Role" for Melissa McCarthy and "Best Writing - Original Screenplay."

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Mar 2011.
---
Daily Variety
16 May 2011
p. 1, 53.
Daily Variety
9 Dec 2011.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 May 2011
pp. 86-87.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Jun 2011.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 2011.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 May 2011
Sec B, p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
13 May 2011
Sec. D, p. 1.
Los Angeles Times
15 May 2011
p. 4.
Los Angeles Times
1 Dec 2011
Sec S, p. 50.
National Post
6 Jan 2012
p. 4.
New York Times
13 May 2011
Sec. C, p. 1.
Variety
29 Jan 2010.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
In assoc with Dentsu, Inc.
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Co-prod
Co-prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Aerial DP
A cam op
1st asst A cam
2d asst A cam
B cam op/Steadicam
1st asst B cam
2d asst B cam
Cam loader
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Dimmerboard op/Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Lighting tech
Rigging chief lighting tech
Asst rigging chief lighting tech
Rigging lighting tech
Rigging lighting tech
Rigging lighting tech
Key grip
Best boy grip
A dolly grip
B dolly grip
Grip
Key rigging grip
Best boy rigging grip
Best boy rigging grip
James Butler
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Stills photog
Night lights by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dept coord
Graphic des
Art dept asst
Storyboard artist
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Addl ed
Addl ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Ed prod asst
On line ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Asst set dec
Set des
Set des
Set dec liaison
Prop master
Asst prop master
Prop asst
Prop asst
Leadman
Gang boss
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
On set dresser
Const coord
Gen foreman
Dec gang boss
Dec gang boss
Propmaker gang boss
Propmaker gang boss
Propmaker gang boss
Propmaker gang boss
Propmaker gang boss
Propmaker gang boss
Propmaker gang boss
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Propmaker
Drapery foreman
Loc foreman
Labor foreman
Loc labor foreman
Laborer gang boss
Laborer gang boss
Head paint foreman
Paint foreman
Standby painter
Plaster foreman
Plasterer gang boss
Key greensman
On set greensman foreman
Greens foreman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost des
Cost supv
Key cost
Key cost
Set cost
Set cost
MUSIC
Mus supv/Mus ed
Scoring eng/Mixer
Mus contractor
Keyboards
SOUND
Boom op
Utility sd
Supv sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
ADR supv
Sd eff ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
ADR ed
1st asst sd ed
ADR asst ed
ADR mixer
ADR rec
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley rec mixer
Foley rec mixer
Foley rec
Foley rec
Dubbing rec
Dolby sd consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Main titles des by
End titles by
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Level 256
Visual eff prod, Level 256
Lead compositor, Level 256
Compositor, Level 256
Compositor, Level 256
Compositor, Level 256
Compositor, Level 256
Rotoscope artist, Level 256
VFX coord, Level 256
MAKEUP
Head makeup
Key makeup
Makeup artist
Head hair stylist
Key hair stylist
Hair stylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Extras casting
ADR voice casting
ADR voice casting
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Scr coord
Video assist
Video playback supv
Video playback supv
Helicopter pilot
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Post prod accountant
Accounting clerk
Asst to Mr. Feig
Asst to Mr. Apatow
Asst to Mr. Apatow
Asst to Mr. Apatow
Asst to Mr. Apatow
Asst to Mr. Mendel
Asst to Mr. Townsend
Asst to Ms. Wiig
DGA trainee
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Apatow intern
Asset coord
Transportation capt
Transportation coord
Dispatcher
D.O.T. admin
Unit pub
Tennis consultant
DVD prod
DVD/EPK videographer
Medic
Animals provided by
Craft service
Craft service
Craft service asst
Craft service asst
Researcher
Stock photog supplied by
Stock footage courtesy of
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Digital intermediate
Digital film colorist
Digital intermediate prod
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Born to Bossa," courtesy of APM Music; "Two Spanish Hearts A," courtesy of APM Music; "Andalusian Dream A," courtesy of APM Music; "Morning Dance," written by Jay Beckenstein, performed by Spyro Gyra, courtesy of Amherst Records, Inc.; "Playground of the Stars," courtesy of APM Music.; "Wilson... I'm Sorry" from Cast Away , written and performed by Alan Silvestri, courtesy of Paramount Pictures and Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation.
SONGS
"Rip Her to Shreds," written Deborah Harry and Chris Stein, performed by Blondie, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from EMI Film & Television Music; "Specks Blues," written by Lonnie Williams, performed by Specs Williams, courtesy of Celery Music and Time Records; "Blister in the Sun," written by Gordon Gano, performed by Nouvelle Vague, courtesy of Peacefrog Ltd.; "That's What Friends Are For," written by Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager; "Paper Bag," written by Fiona Apple Maggart, performed by Fiona Apple, courtesy of Epic Records; "Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap," written by Bon Scott, Angus Young and Malcolm Young, performed by AC/DC, courtesy of Columbia Records; "Do Wah Doo," written by Kate Nash, performed by Kate Nash, courtesy of Polydor Ltd. (UK), under license from Universal Music Enterprises; "Manha De Carnaval," written by Luiz Bonfa and Antonio Maria, performed by Joao Donato, courtesy of RCA Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing; "My Love Is Your Love (Forever)," written by Stevie Wonder and Ivy Jo Hunter, performed by Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises; "I've Just Begun (Having My Fun)," written by Bloodshy, Henrik Jonback, Britney Spears, Avant and Michelle Lynn Bell, performed by Britney Spears, courtesy of Jive Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing; "It's Raining," written by Allen Toussaint, performed by Inara George, courtesy of Elgin Park Recordings; "Violet," written by Courtney Love and Eric Erlandson, performed by Hole, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises; "Answering Bell," written by Ryan Adams, performed by Ryan Adams, courtesy of Lost Highway Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises; "Natural Born Killaz," written by Andre Young and Ice Cube, performed by Dr. Dre and Ice Cube, courtesy of WIDEawake-Death Row Entertainment LLC, under license from EverGreen Copyrights, Inc., a BMG Company; "Hold On," written by Chynna Phillips, Carnie Wilson and Glen Ballard, performed by Wilson Phillips, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from EMI Film & Television Music; "Shakin' All Over," written by Johnny Kidd, performed by Wanda Jackson, courtesy of Third Man Records/Nonesuch Records, by arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing; "Rip Her to Shreds," written by Deborah Harry and Chris Stein, performed by Blondie, courtesy of Eagle Records, a subsidiary of Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
2011
Premiere Information:
South by Southwest Film Festival screening: week of 15 Mar 2011; Los Angeles and New York openings: 13 May 2011
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal City Studios Productions LLLP
12 May 2011
PA1739486
Physical Properties:
Sound
Datasat Digital Sound; SDDS Sony Dynamic Digital Sound®; Dolby® Digital in selected theatres
Color
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision® cameras & lenses
Duration(in mins):
125
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
46648
SYNOPSIS

In Milwaukee, after a night of athletic sex with her friend, Ted, Annie wakes up and applies makeup before returning to bed. Ted wakes up and asks her to leave, uninterested in any form of commitment. That morning, Annie exercises with her best friend, Lillian. At breakfast, Annie admits that she slept with Ted the night before and Lillian expresses disapproval of the relationship. Leaving breakfast, Annie and Lillian walk past Annie’s failed bakery, which is now closed. Annie later works at her job as a jewelry store salesperson, and discourages an engaged couple from getting married. At her apartment, Annie’s roommate, Gil, asks for rent. Annie cannot pay him but promises to get the money. Annie later goes to Lillian’s apartment for drinks, and Lillian breaks the news that her boyfriend Doug, who lives in Chicago, proposed marriage. Annie reacts nervously to Lillian’s engagement news, but accepts Lillian’s request for Annie to be her maid of honor. On her way to Lillian’s engagement party, Annie arrives to pick up her mother at home, but her mother regrets that she won’t be able to attend the party due to a speaking engagement at an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. Arriving at a country club in Chicago, Annie finds Lillian at the party. Lillian introduces Annie to her cousin Rita, another member of the bridal party. Next, Annie meets a bridesmaid named Becca, a coworker of Lillian’s and also newly married. Annie then meets Doug’s sister Megan, an oddball who discusses a spiritual interaction she had with a dolphin. Megan, like Becca, mistakes a strange man for Annie’s date, and Annie must repeat that she is there alone. Lastly, Annie meets Helen, ...

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In Milwaukee, after a night of athletic sex with her friend, Ted, Annie wakes up and applies makeup before returning to bed. Ted wakes up and asks her to leave, uninterested in any form of commitment. That morning, Annie exercises with her best friend, Lillian. At breakfast, Annie admits that she slept with Ted the night before and Lillian expresses disapproval of the relationship. Leaving breakfast, Annie and Lillian walk past Annie’s failed bakery, which is now closed. Annie later works at her job as a jewelry store salesperson, and discourages an engaged couple from getting married. At her apartment, Annie’s roommate, Gil, asks for rent. Annie cannot pay him but promises to get the money. Annie later goes to Lillian’s apartment for drinks, and Lillian breaks the news that her boyfriend Doug, who lives in Chicago, proposed marriage. Annie reacts nervously to Lillian’s engagement news, but accepts Lillian’s request for Annie to be her maid of honor. On her way to Lillian’s engagement party, Annie arrives to pick up her mother at home, but her mother regrets that she won’t be able to attend the party due to a speaking engagement at an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. Arriving at a country club in Chicago, Annie finds Lillian at the party. Lillian introduces Annie to her cousin Rita, another member of the bridal party. Next, Annie meets a bridesmaid named Becca, a coworker of Lillian’s and also newly married. Annie then meets Doug’s sister Megan, an oddball who discusses a spiritual interaction she had with a dolphin. Megan, like Becca, mistakes a strange man for Annie’s date, and Annie must repeat that she is there alone. Lastly, Annie meets Helen, the hostess of the party. Lillian and Helen explain how they met through Doug and Helen’s husband, Perry. Later, Lillian’s father calls Annie onto a stage to give a speech. Annie takes the microphone and congratulates her friend. Helen follows Annie with a heartfelt speech about how close she’s become to Lillian and declares that Lillian is her best friend. Annie and Helen proceed to fight over the microphone, attempting to best each other with sentimental speeches. Before Annie leaves, Lillian asks her to hang out with Helen alone, as a favor to Lillian. Driving home, Annie mocks Helen, driving recklessly while doing so. When a policeman pulls her over, Annie passes a sobriety test but gets a ticket for a broken brake light. The policeman, Officer Rhodes, notices her address, and they talk about the neighborhood. Annie tells Rhodes that she used to have a bakery, and he recognizes the name as he used to be a customer. Warming to her, Rhodes rips up the ticket but makes Annie promise to fix the brake light. Soon after, Annie meets Helen at a tennis club where they play each other in doubles tennis. Helen and Annie compete fiercely in the game, aiming balls at each other’s bodies. Later, at her apartment, Annie confronts Gil about his sister, Brynn, who has been living with them rent-free. Brynn defends herself, insisting that she cannot work because she traveled to America on a tourist visa. Before a dress fitting for Lillian’s wedding, Annie takes the bridal party to a cheap Brazilian restaurant. Helen passes on the meat so she doesn’t bloat, but everyone else eats it. When Lillian goes to the bathroom, Annie suggests that they plan a French-themed bridal shower. Helen argues that the theme might be overtired. Afterwards, Helen arranges a last-minute reservation at a chic boutique for the dress fitting. When the ladies enter the boutique, Megan burps loudly. After the bridesmaids have all tried dresses on, Lillian appears in a wedding dress. Sweating now, Megan rushes to the bathroom to vomit, followed by Becca and Rita. Helen suggests to Annie that the restaurant gave the women food poisoning. Annie refutes the possibility, insisting that she does not feel sick despite the fact that she is now dripping with sweat. Lillian, also sick, rushes into the street in the wedding dress to find another bathroom, but does not make it across before she must have a bowel movement. Later, Annie invites Ted to be her date to Lillian’s wedding. Ted declines because it would be awkward for Annie to explain their relationship. Late that night, Annie runs into Officer Rhodes at a convenience store and they spend time together in the parking lot. Rhodes suggests that instead of stressing about Lillian’s wedding, Annie should be setting up a new bakery, but Annie rejects the idea. Later, Annie sends an email to the bridal party suggesting Lillian’s family’s lakehouse as a location for the bachelorette party. The bridesmaids quickly overrule her, agreeing that the party should take place in Las Vegas. Despite financial setbacks, Annie joins Lillian and the other bridesmaids on a flight to Las Vegas. Afraid of flying, Annie takes pills from Helen to sleep. In first class, where everyone but Annie is sitting, the other bridesmaids bond. Helen visits Annie in coach, offering her a scotch so the pills will have a stronger affect. Later, Annie joins the others in first class, heavily intoxicated. Annie mocks Helen openly, and provokes a flight attendant to send her back to coach. Annie later returns, wearing sunglasses as a disguise, and the flight attendant kicks her out again. After hallucinating something outside the plane, Annie commandeers the flight attendants’ phone to make an announcement, and the plane is grounded in Wyoming. Kicked off of the flight, the ladies take a bus back to Chicago. Annie begs Lillian’s forgiveness, promising to make it up to her with the bridal shower, but Lillian wants Helen to organize the shower. Driving back to Milwaukee, Annie sees Rhodes. They go to a bar and have a drink. Rhodes encourages Annie to bake, but Annie tells him she’s done with that. He confesses that he’s been thinking about her. They go back to Rhodes’s house and sleep together. The next morning, Annie wakes up and finds that Rhodes has bought her supplies to bake. Upset by his prodding, she tells him she doesn’t need him to fix her and leaves. The next morning, Annie receives an elaborate invitation to Lillian’s bridal shower, hosted by Helen. The theme is Parisian, as Annie had originally suggested. At work, Annie tries to talk a teenaged girl out of buying a “best friends forever” necklace, then fights with her and gets fired. Gil and Brynn kick Annie out of their apartment, and Annie moves in with her mother. Later, Annie goes to Helen’s home, a massive mansion, for the bridal shower. There, Lillian apologizes to Annie for ignoring her calls. After Lillian opens Annie’s gift, filled with things from Milwaukee and memorabilia from their childhood, Helen gives Lillian a card with her gift, a trip to Paris for the two of them. Frustrated, Annie confronts Helen about the gift, and the fact that Annie gave her the idea of Paris in the first place. Annie runs to the backyard and destroys the decorations. Lillian follows her outside and they fight. Lillian tells Annie that if she’s going to act like this then to not bother coming to the wedding. On the way home, Annie’s car is struck by a hit and run driver. Officer Rhodes arrives on the scene and reprimands Annie for never getting her brake lights fixed. He then confronts her about how she treated him. Ted shows up to give Annie a ride and Rhodes leaves in a huff. At her mom’s house, Annie sulks. Megan arrives with nine puppies she took from the shower. Megan gives Annie a pep talk, roughhousing her to prove that life is difficult but only Annie can solve her own problems. Taking Megan’s advice, Annie bakes and shows affection to her mother. Finally visiting a mechanic, Annie attempts to pay him to fix her brake lights, but he refuses the money as he owes Rhodes a favor. Annie makes a cake and leaves it at Officer Rhodes’ house. She watches from the street as he opens it, then ignores it. Annie drives past a few more times and sees raccoons eating the cake. The day of Lillian’s wedding, Annie’s mom encourages her daughter to accompany her to the wedding. Annie refuses. Helen shows up and asks for Annie’s help in finding Lillian, who has disappeared. Annie drives Helen to find Lillian. Helen apologizes to Annie in the car, admitting that she doesn’t have any female friends. Annie happens upon Rhodes and asks for his help, but he ignores her. Annie proceeds to drive past him doing various illegal things to get his attention, finally running into the back of his car. Rhodes agrees to help, tracing Lillian’s cell phone to her apartment. When they arrive at Lillian’s apartment, Helen agrees to stay in the car. Annie finds Lillian hiding in her bed. Lillian apologizes for kicking Annie out of her wedding. Lillian confesses that she left the rehearsal dinner the night before and came home to her apartment when she was only supposed to run an errand. Lillian worries about the upcoming changes in her life and moving further away from Annie. Annie reassures her, and promises to help Lillian fix the lavish but overdesigned wedding dress that Helen helped Lillian get from a Parisian designer. The wedding takes place, and Lillian’s favorite childhood band, Wilson Phillips, performs live, courtesy of Helen. Lillian heads off for her honeymoon and waves goodbye to Annie before leaving. Helen finds Annie after the wedding and tells Annie that it was nice meeting her. Annie suggests that maybe sometime they go to dinner. Officer Rhodes shows up, tipped off by Helen. He and Annie kiss. On duty, Rhodes invites Annie to come with him but forces her to ride in the back.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.