One Hundred Men and a Girl (1937)

83-85 mins | Musical | 5 September 1937

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HISTORY

Some contemporary sources list the film's title as 100 Men and a Girl . The film's onscreen credits incorrectly lists the its PCA certificate number as 3468. According to records in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the number 3448 was issued to One Hundred Men and a Girl , and number 3468 was issued to the 1937 Victory Pictures release Blake of Scotland Yard (see above).
       The opening cast credits for One Hundred Men and a Girl ends with the statement: "...with Leopold Stokowski conducting music from..." Thus, his name is separate from the other cast credits. At the time this film was made, Stokowski was the conductor of the Philadelphia Symphony, and had appeared in one other film, The Big Broadcast of 1937 (see above). FD reports that Jed Prouty was borrowed from Twentieth Century-Fox for this film. According to a news item in HR , the film had its premiere at the Pantages theatre in Hollywood, with a ticket price of two dollars.
       According to the pressbook, the set for the auditorium was rebuilt from the set used in Phantom of the Opera , and Stokowski's New York home is seen in the film. The pressbook and various reviews noted the use of multiple channels and sound tracks in recording the orchestra in the film, a technique that MPH said "...may turn out to be one of the precedential aspects of this production." The reported number of microphones used varies from twelve, fourteen and twenty-eight. The procedure was arranged at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia, ...

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Some contemporary sources list the film's title as 100 Men and a Girl . The film's onscreen credits incorrectly lists the its PCA certificate number as 3468. According to records in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the number 3448 was issued to One Hundred Men and a Girl , and number 3468 was issued to the 1937 Victory Pictures release Blake of Scotland Yard (see above).
       The opening cast credits for One Hundred Men and a Girl ends with the statement: "...with Leopold Stokowski conducting music from..." Thus, his name is separate from the other cast credits. At the time this film was made, Stokowski was the conductor of the Philadelphia Symphony, and had appeared in one other film, The Big Broadcast of 1937 (see above). FD reports that Jed Prouty was borrowed from Twentieth Century-Fox for this film. According to a news item in HR , the film had its premiere at the Pantages theatre in Hollywood, with a ticket price of two dollars.
       According to the pressbook, the set for the auditorium was rebuilt from the set used in Phantom of the Opera , and Stokowski's New York home is seen in the film. The pressbook and various reviews noted the use of multiple channels and sound tracks in recording the orchestra in the film, a technique that MPH said "...may turn out to be one of the precedential aspects of this production." The reported number of microphones used varies from twelve, fourteen and twenty-eight. The procedure was arranged at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia, PA, and RCA recorders were used. One Hundred Men and a Girl was nominated for the 1937 Academy Awards for Best Picture; Film Editing (Bernard W. Burton); Sound Recording (Universal Studio Sound Dept., Homer Tasker, sound dir); and Original Story (Hans Kraly). The film won the Academy Award for Musical Score.

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HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
3 Sep 1937
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
17 May 1937
p. 31.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jul 1937
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Aug 1937
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 1937
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
11 Sep 1937
p. 40.
Motion Picture Herald
18 Sep 1937
p. 29.
New York Times
18 Sep 1937
p. 15.
Variety
8 Sep 1937
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
Based on an idea by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Assoc prod des, Sets
Assoc prod des, Sets
Assoc prod des, Gowns
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
Assoc mus dir
Vocal instructor
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Montages
SOURCES
MUSIC
Rakoczy March by Hector Berlioz
Overture to the opera Zampa, ou la fiancee de marbre , music by Ferdinand Herold, libretto by Anne Honoré Joseph Mélesville
"Lento a capriccio" from Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 by Franz Liszt
+
MUSIC
Rakoczy March by Hector Berlioz
Overture to the opera Zampa, ou la fiancee de marbre , music by Ferdinand Herold, libretto by Anne Honoré Joseph Mélesville
"Lento a capriccio" from Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 by Franz Liszt
"Exsultate, jubilate" from Motet by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Symphony No. 5 by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Prelude to Third Act of the opera Lohengrin , music and libretto by Richard Wagner.
+
SONGS
"The Drinking Song" from the opera La traviata , music by Giuseppe Verdi, libretto by Francesco Maria Piave
"It's Raining Sunbeams," music by Frederick Hollander, lyrics by Sam Coslow
"A Heart That's Free," music by Alfred G. Robyn, lyrics by Thomas T. Railey.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
5 September 1937
Production Date:
15 May--24 Jul 1937
Copyright Info
Claimant
DATE
CopyrightNumber
Universal Pictures Co.
3 September 1937
LP7377
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
83-85
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
3448
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Unemployed trombone player John Cardwell begs conductor Leopold Stokowski for a job, but his manager throws him out into the street, where he finds a lady's purse. When he attempts to return the purse, the doorman slams the door in his face, and so he returns to his apartment, using the money in the purse to pay his rent. John tells his daughter, Patsy, he did get a job with the orchestra, but when she finds out he was lying, insists on returning the purse herself to socialite Mrs. Frost, after finding her address in the purse. Mrs. Frost is delighted with Patsy, who makes an impassioned speech to her wealthy guests about all the out-of-work musicians in town. On a suggestion from a guest, Patsy decides to form her own orchestra, and Mrs. Frost blithely agrees to be the financial backer. Patsy's father and friends form a one-hundred man orchestra and begin rehearsals in a garage, but when Patsy discovers Mrs. Frost has left for Europe and forgotten her promise, she calls on her husband, John R. Frost, who thinks the whole thing is a practical joke until John punches him for leading them on. Refusing to give up, Patsy hides in Stokowski's office in the auditorium where he rehearses, and when a newspaper editor telephones, she tells him that Stokowski will be conducting an orchestra of unemployed men sponsored by Frost. After Patsy sneaks into the auditorium and sings with the orchestra, Stokowski takes her more seriously, but refuses to conduct her orchestra to give it legitimacy. Patsy becomes disillusioned until the newspaper prints the story she gave the editor ...

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Unemployed trombone player John Cardwell begs conductor Leopold Stokowski for a job, but his manager throws him out into the street, where he finds a lady's purse. When he attempts to return the purse, the doorman slams the door in his face, and so he returns to his apartment, using the money in the purse to pay his rent. John tells his daughter, Patsy, he did get a job with the orchestra, but when she finds out he was lying, insists on returning the purse herself to socialite Mrs. Frost, after finding her address in the purse. Mrs. Frost is delighted with Patsy, who makes an impassioned speech to her wealthy guests about all the out-of-work musicians in town. On a suggestion from a guest, Patsy decides to form her own orchestra, and Mrs. Frost blithely agrees to be the financial backer. Patsy's father and friends form a one-hundred man orchestra and begin rehearsals in a garage, but when Patsy discovers Mrs. Frost has left for Europe and forgotten her promise, she calls on her husband, John R. Frost, who thinks the whole thing is a practical joke until John punches him for leading them on. Refusing to give up, Patsy hides in Stokowski's office in the auditorium where he rehearses, and when a newspaper editor telephones, she tells him that Stokowski will be conducting an orchestra of unemployed men sponsored by Frost. After Patsy sneaks into the auditorium and sings with the orchestra, Stokowski takes her more seriously, but refuses to conduct her orchestra to give it legitimacy. Patsy becomes disillusioned until the newspaper prints the story she gave the editor and Frost realizes the orchestra is a great publicity stunt for his company. To convince Stokowski to conduct for them, Patsy sneaks the entire orchestra into his house to play for him. He is so moved by their performance, that he cancels a European trip to conduct the orchestra, after which Patsy is called on stage to sing.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.