Wayward (1932)

71-72 or 74 mins | Melodrama | 19 February 1932

Full page view
HISTORY

Almira Sessions and Paula Lind made their screen debuts in this ...

More Less

Almira Sessions and Paula Lind made their screen debuts in this film.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Corporate note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
14 Feb 32
p. 10.
Motion Picture Daily
22-Jun-31
---
Motion Picture Herald
20 Feb 32
p. 34.
New York Times
15 Feb 32
p. 13.
Variety
16 Feb 32
p. 33.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
FILM EDITOR
SOUND
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Wild Beauty by Mateel Howe Farnham (New York, 1930).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"What's the Difference?" words and music by John W. Green.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 February 1932
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 12 Feb 1932
Production Date:
at Paramount-Publix New York Studios (Astoria, Long Island)
Copyright Info
Claimant
DATE
CopyrightNumber
Paramount Publix Corp.
23 February 1932
LP2875
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71-72 or 74
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Chorus girl Daisy Lehay impulsively marries bank clerk David Brownbeck Frost, whom she has only known for a week, but with whom she is in love. They return to his Pennsylvania hometown of Cloughbarre, where she finds that his is the founding family and among the town's wealthiest residents. David's mother vehemently opposes his marriage, as does his uncle Judson, who is David's employer. After she is befriended by the black sheep of the family, Robert "Bob" Daniels, Mrs. Frost and Judson attempt to bribe Daisy to leave David, but David intervenes and, appalled by his mother's interference, leaves the family. Two years later, David and Daisy are raising Daisy's namesake in a poverty-stricken cottage while David works at a cement factory. One day, Daisy decides to seek employment and leaves her daughter in the care of neighbor girl, Ella. She is unsuccessful in finding work, however, and runs into Bob, who buys her lunch while they discuss her prospects of teaching singing lessons. Mrs. Frost sees Daisy with Bob and suspecting the worst, goes to the cottage where she finds the baby violently ill, because Ella fed her sour clam juice. Mrs. Frost takes the baby home and tells David of his wife's indiscretion. David then insists he and Daisy live with his mother. Suspicion against Daisy mounts when she accepts a ride with Bob after turning her ankle, and David and Mrs. Frost see them together. At a party, David dances with his former sweetheart, Mary Morton, and Daisy believes he no longer loves her. She and Bob get drunk, and when he suggests they run off together, she goes along ...

More Less

Chorus girl Daisy Lehay impulsively marries bank clerk David Brownbeck Frost, whom she has only known for a week, but with whom she is in love. They return to his Pennsylvania hometown of Cloughbarre, where she finds that his is the founding family and among the town's wealthiest residents. David's mother vehemently opposes his marriage, as does his uncle Judson, who is David's employer. After she is befriended by the black sheep of the family, Robert "Bob" Daniels, Mrs. Frost and Judson attempt to bribe Daisy to leave David, but David intervenes and, appalled by his mother's interference, leaves the family. Two years later, David and Daisy are raising Daisy's namesake in a poverty-stricken cottage while David works at a cement factory. One day, Daisy decides to seek employment and leaves her daughter in the care of neighbor girl, Ella. She is unsuccessful in finding work, however, and runs into Bob, who buys her lunch while they discuss her prospects of teaching singing lessons. Mrs. Frost sees Daisy with Bob and suspecting the worst, goes to the cottage where she finds the baby violently ill, because Ella fed her sour clam juice. Mrs. Frost takes the baby home and tells David of his wife's indiscretion. David then insists he and Daisy live with his mother. Suspicion against Daisy mounts when she accepts a ride with Bob after turning her ankle, and David and Mrs. Frost see them together. At a party, David dances with his former sweetheart, Mary Morton, and Daisy believes he no longer loves her. She and Bob get drunk, and when he suggests they run off together, she goes along with him. When David hears the news, he insists that Daisy must be drunk and goes in search of her. Daisy passes out and when she awakens in a motel with Bob, she is horrified by her drunken decision. She insists Bob drive her home, and they are on the road as David arrives at the motel and discovers they have left. Mrs. Frost throws Daisy out of the house and never tells David she returned. Five months later, Daisy, who is supporting herself by teaching singing lessons, goes to the Frosts to take her child. In the midst of a confrontation with Mrs. Frost, David learns of his mother's cruelty and deceitfulness, and reunites with his wife for good.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.