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HISTORY

No writing credits were given in the onscreen credits, which several reviews noted was unusual. The writers listed above were taken from a 9 Oct 1935 Hal Roach Studios credit sheet contained in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library. The extent of each writer's contribution to the completed film has not been determined. A 20 Jul 1934 HR news item announced that producer Hal Roach intended to make a feature film of Michael William Balfe and Alfred Bunn's The Bohemian Girl , but pre-production work on the film apparently did not begin until Aug 1936. According to HR news items, recording engineer Elmer Raguse recorded music and singing for the film in New York under the supervision of Nathaniel Shilkret. HR news items also noted that Roach was to personally direct the dramatic sequences in the film, and while he is listed as a director on some of the daily production sheets contained in company records at the USC Cinema-Television Library, modern sources state that he was too preoccupied with the construction on the lot to spend much time directing. The Bohemian Girl was the last film of actress Thelma Todd, who died of carbon monoxide poisoning on 16 Dec 1935. According to a 2 Jan 1936 HR news item, Roach ordered retakes in order to "minimize the importance of the character played by the late Thelma Todd," because he wanted to "avoid as much as possible any reaction from the notoriety surrounding the player's tragic death." Modern sources speculate that in the picture as it was filmed in Oct ... More Less

No writing credits were given in the onscreen credits, which several reviews noted was unusual. The writers listed above were taken from a 9 Oct 1935 Hal Roach Studios credit sheet contained in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library. The extent of each writer's contribution to the completed film has not been determined. A 20 Jul 1934 HR news item announced that producer Hal Roach intended to make a feature film of Michael William Balfe and Alfred Bunn's The Bohemian Girl , but pre-production work on the film apparently did not begin until Aug 1936. According to HR news items, recording engineer Elmer Raguse recorded music and singing for the film in New York under the supervision of Nathaniel Shilkret. HR news items also noted that Roach was to personally direct the dramatic sequences in the film, and while he is listed as a director on some of the daily production sheets contained in company records at the USC Cinema-Television Library, modern sources state that he was too preoccupied with the construction on the lot to spend much time directing. The Bohemian Girl was the last film of actress Thelma Todd, who died of carbon monoxide poisoning on 16 Dec 1935. According to a 2 Jan 1936 HR news item, Roach ordered retakes in order to "minimize the importance of the character played by the late Thelma Todd," because he wanted to "avoid as much as possible any reaction from the notoriety surrounding the player's tragic death." Modern sources speculate that in the picture as it was filmed in Oct and Nov 1935, Todd played the gypsy queen, who had a romance with the character Devilshoof. After Todd's death, Zeffie Tilbury was added to the cast as the gypsy queen, and the romantic subplot was reworked so that "Mrs. Hardy" and "Devilshoof" were the lovers.
       Modern sources sources add the following actors to the cast: Harold Switzer ( Gypsy kid ); Bob O'Conor ( Tavern waiter ); Dick Gilbert ( Torture chamber brute ); Jack Hill, William Moore and Lane Chandler ( Soldiers ); Sammy Brooks , Alice Cooke, Tony Campenero and Rita Dunn ( Gypsies ); Charlie Hall ( Voice-over for gypsy offering congratulations ); Laughing Gravy ( Dog ); Bill Madsen, Frank Darien and Arthur Rowlands . In addition, modern sources complete the above cast list with the following character names: Harry Bowen ( Drunk ); Baldwin Cooke ( Soldier ); Sam Lufkin ( Shopkeeper/Guard/Pickpocket victim ); and Edward Earle ( Gypsy ). Balfe and Bunn's opera was first filmed in Great Britain as The Bohemian Girl , a 1922 Alliance production, directed by Harley Knoles and starring Gladys Cooper and Ivor Novello. For additional information about Laurel and Hardy's career together, please See Entry for Pardon Us . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22-Feb-36
---
Daily Variety
12 Dec 35
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Feb 36
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 34
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Aug 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Sep 35
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Oct 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Oct 35
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 35
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 36
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 36
p. 19.
Motion Picture Daily
13 Dec 35
p. 7.
Motion Picture Herald
14 Dec 35
p. 51.
Motion Picture Herald
7 Mar 36
p. 51.
New York Times
17 Feb 36
p. 21.
Variety
18-Dec-35
---
Variety
19 Feb 36
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Pres
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
Photog
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Supv ed Supv film ed
MUSIC
VISUAL EFFECTS
Photog eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr clerk
STAND INS
Doubles
Doubles
Doubles
Doubles
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the opera The Bohemian Girl , music by Michael William Balfe, libretto by Alfred Bunn (London, 27 Nov 1843).
SONGS
"Then You'll Remember Me," "The Heart Bowed Down," "I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls" and other selections from the opera The Bohemian Girl , music by Michael William Balfe, libretto by Alfred Bunn
"Heart of a Gypsy," music and lyrics by Nathaniel Shilkret and Robert Shayon.
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 February 1936
Production Date:
9 Oct--2 Nov and 13 Nov--26 Nov 1935; retakes early Jan 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 February 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6453
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72 or 80
Length(in feet):
6,489
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1725
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

A band of gypsies set up camp on the lands of Count Arnheim, who warns them they have until noon the next day to leave. As the rest of the gypsies prepare for their night's work of pickpocketing villagers, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy do chores, while Mrs. Hardy alternately scolds them and cavorts with her sweetheart Devilshoof. That night Stan and Ollie go to town, where they happily succeed in acquiring the contents of the townspeople's pockets. Meanwhile, Devilshoof goes to Arnheim's castle and watches Arnheim give a medallion to his young daughter Arline, after which Devilshoof is captured by Arnheim's guards and flogged. The next day, as the gypsies are leaving after being thrown off the land by Arnheim's soldiers, the bitter Devilshoof and Mrs. Hardy see Arline by the side of the road, where she has wandered from the castle, and they kidnap her. At camp that afternoon, Mrs. Hardy tells Ollie that the child is his, which delights him. Soon after, however, Devilshoof is preparing to leave the band of gypsies forever, and he hints to Mrs. Hardy that he will take her with him if she obtains enough money. Fooling Stan into helping her, Mrs. Hardy then makes off with all of Ollie and Stan's money and leaves a note telling Ollie that he is not Arline's father. The note does not deter Ollie though, and over the next twelve years, he and Stan prove to be excellent fathers to the child. Now a lovely young woman, Arline believes she is a gypsy when they once again camp on Arnheim's lands. One morning, after telling her foster fathers ... +


A band of gypsies set up camp on the lands of Count Arnheim, who warns them they have until noon the next day to leave. As the rest of the gypsies prepare for their night's work of pickpocketing villagers, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy do chores, while Mrs. Hardy alternately scolds them and cavorts with her sweetheart Devilshoof. That night Stan and Ollie go to town, where they happily succeed in acquiring the contents of the townspeople's pockets. Meanwhile, Devilshoof goes to Arnheim's castle and watches Arnheim give a medallion to his young daughter Arline, after which Devilshoof is captured by Arnheim's guards and flogged. The next day, as the gypsies are leaving after being thrown off the land by Arnheim's soldiers, the bitter Devilshoof and Mrs. Hardy see Arline by the side of the road, where she has wandered from the castle, and they kidnap her. At camp that afternoon, Mrs. Hardy tells Ollie that the child is his, which delights him. Soon after, however, Devilshoof is preparing to leave the band of gypsies forever, and he hints to Mrs. Hardy that he will take her with him if she obtains enough money. Fooling Stan into helping her, Mrs. Hardy then makes off with all of Ollie and Stan's money and leaves a note telling Ollie that he is not Arline's father. The note does not deter Ollie though, and over the next twelve years, he and Stan prove to be excellent fathers to the child. Now a lovely young woman, Arline believes she is a gypsy when they once again camp on Arnheim's lands. One morning, after telling her foster fathers about her dream of living in marble halls, Arline goes to town with Ollie, who leaves Stan to bottle some wine for him. The task proves to be too complicated, and Stan soon becomes what Ollie terms "guzzled." Arline wanders off to the castle, where Arnheim is having her baby things packed away for good. She is captured by the count's men, and Arnheim orders her to be flogged without seeing her. Ollie witnesses her capture and runs back to get Stan, who can barely walk. They succeed in reaching Arline, but are all recaptured before they leave the castle gates. As Captain Finn begins to tie Arline to the flogging post, he tears off her medallion and throws it at Arnheim's feet. The count recognizes the necklace and the birthmark on her shoulder, and the pair have a happy reunion. Meanwhile, Stan and Ollie have been taken to the torture chamber, where Ollie is stretched and Stan is compacted. Arline hears their screams and begs Arnheim for mercy, telling him how kind they were to her. The boys are released, with Ollie now a thin giant and Stan a dwarf. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.