Young People (1940)

78 mins | Drama | 30 August 1940

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HISTORY

The working title of this picture was The Come Back , and it was Shirley Temple's last picture on her seven-year Twentieth-Century Fox contract. An early HR production chart lists Arthur Miller as photographer. Studio publicity adds that Sidney Lanfield was originally to have directed, but was re-assigned to Elsa Maxwell's Public Deb No. 1. Materials contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library indicate that the original story idea was dictated by Darryl F. Zanuck, who wanted to show Temple growing up on screen in front of a live audience. According to studio press releases, the success of the film's preview led Fox producer Sol Wurtzel to team George Montgomery and Arleen Whelan in the 1940 film Charter Pilot . Studio publicity stories note that Kathleen Howard, who played the harsh old maid "Hester," talked Allan Dwan into rewriting the ending of the film so that "Wendy" wins over "Hester," thus making her less of a heavy. Studio publicity also notes that the hurricane sequence in the film was shot using equipment from Fox's production The Rains Came (see ... More Less

The working title of this picture was The Come Back , and it was Shirley Temple's last picture on her seven-year Twentieth-Century Fox contract. An early HR production chart lists Arthur Miller as photographer. Studio publicity adds that Sidney Lanfield was originally to have directed, but was re-assigned to Elsa Maxwell's Public Deb No. 1. Materials contained in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library indicate that the original story idea was dictated by Darryl F. Zanuck, who wanted to show Temple growing up on screen in front of a live audience. According to studio press releases, the success of the film's preview led Fox producer Sol Wurtzel to team George Montgomery and Arleen Whelan in the 1940 film Charter Pilot . Studio publicity stories note that Kathleen Howard, who played the harsh old maid "Hester," talked Allan Dwan into rewriting the ending of the film so that "Wendy" wins over "Hester," thus making her less of a heavy. Studio publicity also notes that the hurricane sequence in the film was shot using equipment from Fox's production The Rains Came (see below). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
10 Jul 40
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Jul 40
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Mar 40
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jul 40
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
15 Jul 40
p. 4.
Motion Picture Herald
13 Jul 40
p. 24.
New York Times
24 Aug 40
p. 16.
Variety
17 Jul 40
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
Orig story
Orig story
Contr to trmt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Jack Oakie's wardrobe
MUSIC
Mus dir
DANCE
Dance dir
Dance dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Props
SOURCES
SONGS
"Fifth Avenue," "I Wouldn't Take a Million," "Tra, La, La, La," "The Mason-Dixon Line" and "Young People," words and music by Mack Gordon and Harry Warren.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Come Back
Release Date:
30 August 1940
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 24 Aug
Production Date:
began 15 Mar 1940
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
30 August 1940
Copyright Number:
LP10117
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
78
Length(in feet):
7,231
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
6232
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When their old friend, Barney O'Hara, dies, vaudevillians Kit and Joe Ballantine adopt his infant daughter Wendy. Wendy is barely able to walk when she joins the Ballantines' song-and-dance act, and although she is beloved by her audiences, Joe and Kit think that she deserves a normal life instead of one filled with hotel rooms and trains. Consequently, they purchase a farm in Stonefield, Vermont and leave the theater. The gregarious Ballantines arrive in Stonefield to find that they are unwelcome by the narrow-minded citizenry, who are led by Hester Appleby, the hidebound town matriarch and schoolteacher. They are are welcomed, however, by newspaper owner Mike Shea, the only person in town who believes in change. Mike's outspoken opinions create problems in his courtship of Judith, Hester's niece. During a town meeting, the civic-minded Joe supports Mike's idea to promote tourism, and to humiliate Joe, the citizenry appoints him a one-man chamber of commerce. While Mr. Dakin and others make fun of Joe behind his back, Wendy transforms Hester's prosaic school show into a dynamic vaudeville act. When the children stage the show, however, their parents object to the material and stop it in mid-performance. This last humiliation prompts the Ballantines to decide to pack up and return to show business. In a final act of cruelty, one of the children tells Wendy that she is adopted. A raging storm strikes on the day of their departure, and on their way to the train station, they find a group of lost children and take them to Hester's house for shelter. Discovering that little Jerry Dakin is still lost in ... +


When their old friend, Barney O'Hara, dies, vaudevillians Kit and Joe Ballantine adopt his infant daughter Wendy. Wendy is barely able to walk when she joins the Ballantines' song-and-dance act, and although she is beloved by her audiences, Joe and Kit think that she deserves a normal life instead of one filled with hotel rooms and trains. Consequently, they purchase a farm in Stonefield, Vermont and leave the theater. The gregarious Ballantines arrive in Stonefield to find that they are unwelcome by the narrow-minded citizenry, who are led by Hester Appleby, the hidebound town matriarch and schoolteacher. They are are welcomed, however, by newspaper owner Mike Shea, the only person in town who believes in change. Mike's outspoken opinions create problems in his courtship of Judith, Hester's niece. During a town meeting, the civic-minded Joe supports Mike's idea to promote tourism, and to humiliate Joe, the citizenry appoints him a one-man chamber of commerce. While Mr. Dakin and others make fun of Joe behind his back, Wendy transforms Hester's prosaic school show into a dynamic vaudeville act. When the children stage the show, however, their parents object to the material and stop it in mid-performance. This last humiliation prompts the Ballantines to decide to pack up and return to show business. In a final act of cruelty, one of the children tells Wendy that she is adopted. A raging storm strikes on the day of their departure, and on their way to the train station, they find a group of lost children and take them to Hester's house for shelter. Discovering that little Jerry Dakin is still lost in the storm, Joe braves the weather to rescue the boy. Joe's bravery forces the townsfolk to revise their opinions of the newcomers, and they finally unite behind the Ballantines' progressive ideas. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.