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HISTORY

According to the Feb--Jun 1921 issue of Photoplay magazine, Agnes Ayres replaced lead actress Ann Forrest partway through the production after director Cecil B. De Mille decided Forrest was not physically suited for the role.
       Production was completed on the Famous Players-Lasky Corp. studio in Hollywood, CA. The 10 Oct 1920 Exhibitors Herald reported that a full theater set was constructed for a “play within a play” sequence, while various contemporary sources stated that anywhere from $40,000 to $65,000 was spent on plate glass for an elaborate “Cinderella” palace set. The Aug 1921--Jan 1922 Motion Picture Magazine reported a total production cost of $425,000. A 23 Oct 1920 Wid’s Daily announced the recent completion of principal photography.
       Forbidden Fruit was selected to be shown as the main attraction during the Rivoli Theatre’s anniversary week in Jan 1921. Three weeks later, the 3 Feb 1921 Wid’s Daily reported the film would continue its Broadway run at the nearby Rialto Theatre, where it played for an additional four weeks. Meanwhile, a 22 Jan 1921 Wid’s Daily brief announced that a 29 Jan 1921 screening commemorated the opening of the new Stanley Theatre in Philadelphia, PA. The 19 Feb 1921 Motion Picture News indicated that general release was scheduled for 13 Feb 1921.
       The 22 Jan 1921 Wid’s Daily indicated that the musical score was completed by Hugo Riesenfeld. ...

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According to the Feb--Jun 1921 issue of Photoplay magazine, Agnes Ayres replaced lead actress Ann Forrest partway through the production after director Cecil B. De Mille decided Forrest was not physically suited for the role.
       Production was completed on the Famous Players-Lasky Corp. studio in Hollywood, CA. The 10 Oct 1920 Exhibitors Herald reported that a full theater set was constructed for a “play within a play” sequence, while various contemporary sources stated that anywhere from $40,000 to $65,000 was spent on plate glass for an elaborate “Cinderella” palace set. The Aug 1921--Jan 1922 Motion Picture Magazine reported a total production cost of $425,000. A 23 Oct 1920 Wid’s Daily announced the recent completion of principal photography.
       Forbidden Fruit was selected to be shown as the main attraction during the Rivoli Theatre’s anniversary week in Jan 1921. Three weeks later, the 3 Feb 1921 Wid’s Daily reported the film would continue its Broadway run at the nearby Rialto Theatre, where it played for an additional four weeks. Meanwhile, a 22 Jan 1921 Wid’s Daily brief announced that a 29 Jan 1921 screening commemorated the opening of the new Stanley Theatre in Philadelphia, PA. The 19 Feb 1921 Motion Picture News indicated that general release was scheduled for 13 Feb 1921.
       The 22 Jan 1921 Wid’s Daily indicated that the musical score was completed by Hugo Riesenfeld.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
10 Oct 1920
p. 108.
Exhibitors Herald
15 Jan 1921
p. 71.
Motion Picture Magazine
Aug 1921--Jan 1922
p. 105.
Motion Picture News
19 Feb 1921
p. 1493.
Photoplay
Jan 1921.
---
Photoplay
Feb--Jun 1921
p. 99.
The Photodramatist
Sep 1921
p. 24.
Wid's Daily
23 Oct 1920
p. 2.
Wid's Daily
22 Dec 1920
p. 1.
Wid's Daily
22 Jan 1921
p. 2.
Wid's Daily
3 Feb 1921
p. 1.
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 February 1921
Premiere Information:
New York opening: Jan 1921
Production Date:
ended Oct 1920
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Famous Players-Lasky Corp.
6 January 1921
LP16001
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
7,804
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Forced to work because her wastrel husband, Steve, prefers to gamble, seamstress Mary Maddock agrees to substitute for an ailing debutante at Mrs. Mallory's dinner in honor of oil magnate Nelson Rogers. She makes a hit, and--angered at Steve--she accepts Mrs. Mallory's invitation to visit for a few days. Steve persuades Pietro, the Mallory butler, to help him rob the Mallory safe; and Mary's scream of recognition awakes Nelson, who releases Steve and pays him blackmail money because he is Mary's husband. A quarrel between Steve and Pietro leads to Steve's death, Pietro's arrest, and future happiness for Mary and ...

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Forced to work because her wastrel husband, Steve, prefers to gamble, seamstress Mary Maddock agrees to substitute for an ailing debutante at Mrs. Mallory's dinner in honor of oil magnate Nelson Rogers. She makes a hit, and--angered at Steve--she accepts Mrs. Mallory's invitation to visit for a few days. Steve persuades Pietro, the Mallory butler, to help him rob the Mallory safe; and Mary's scream of recognition awakes Nelson, who releases Steve and pays him blackmail money because he is Mary's husband. A quarrel between Steve and Pietro leads to Steve's death, Pietro's arrest, and future happiness for Mary and Nelson.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Society


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.