The Freshman (1925)

Comedy | 20 September 1925

Producer:

Harold Lloyd

Cinematographer:

Walter Lundin

Editor:

Allen McNeil

Production Designer:

Liell K. Vedder

Production Company:

Harold Lloyd Corp.
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HISTORY

A print of The Freshman was restored by the UCLA Film and Television Archive in 2002. At that time, a new score was written for the film by Carl Davis. Portions of the football game were incorporated into the beginning scenes of the 1947 film The Sin of Harold Diddlebock , directed by Preston Sturgis and starring Harold Lloyd as the title character. In the 1947 film, it is implied that Lloyd's character is the same person as "Harold Lamb" of The Freshman , but the films are otherwise unrelated. Modern sources include Gus Leonard, Oscar Smith and Charles A. Stevenson in the cast.
       In his Silent Visions (Santa Monica, CA, 2011), John Bengtson revealed that a train scene was filmed at the Southern Pacific train station in Ontario, CA, east of Los Angeles, and at the Pacific Electric station in Culver City, CA. Most college scenes were filmed at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, CA, but the big game was shot on 22 Nov 1924 at the California Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, CA, during the halftime of a real USC and Stanford University game.
       Voted one of the “Top Best Features” of 1925 by the 1929 Film Daily Year Book, as reported in the 7 Feb 1930 FD.
       The Freshman kicked off the Twenty-Second Annual San Francisco Silent Film Festival on 1 Jun 2017. ... More Less

A print of The Freshman was restored by the UCLA Film and Television Archive in 2002. At that time, a new score was written for the film by Carl Davis. Portions of the football game were incorporated into the beginning scenes of the 1947 film The Sin of Harold Diddlebock , directed by Preston Sturgis and starring Harold Lloyd as the title character. In the 1947 film, it is implied that Lloyd's character is the same person as "Harold Lamb" of The Freshman , but the films are otherwise unrelated. Modern sources include Gus Leonard, Oscar Smith and Charles A. Stevenson in the cast.
       In his Silent Visions (Santa Monica, CA, 2011), John Bengtson revealed that a train scene was filmed at the Southern Pacific train station in Ontario, CA, east of Los Angeles, and at the Pacific Electric station in Culver City, CA. Most college scenes were filmed at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, CA, but the big game was shot on 22 Nov 1924 at the California Memorial Stadium in Berkeley, CA, during the halftime of a real USC and Stanford University game.
       Voted one of the “Top Best Features” of 1925 by the 1929 Film Daily Year Book, as reported in the 7 Feb 1930 FD.
       The Freshman kicked off the Twenty-Second Annual San Francisco Silent Film Festival on 1 Jun 2017. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
25 Jul 1925
p. 47.
Film Daily
12 Jul 1925.
---
Film Daily
7 Feb 1930
p. 8.
Life
3 Dec 1925
p. 51.
New York Times
21 Sep 1925
p. 12.
Photoplay
Sep 1925
p. 51.
Variety
15 Jul 1925
p. 34.
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 September 1925
Copyright Claimant:
Pathé Exchange, inc.
Copyright Date:
27 July 1925
Copyright Number:
LP21675
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,883
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Harold Lamb, an eager, uncoordinated college freshman who yearns to be the most popular man on campus, incurs contempt from a college cad and others when he emulates the demeanor of a movie college man. He tries to win friendship by spending most of his college money treating his classmates, but is only truly liked by Peggy, the daughter of his landlady. Harold, who now likes to go by the nickname "Speedy," tries further measures to make himself popular and attempts to join the football team. Because the football coach admires the unathletic Harold's spirit, he makes him the team waterboy but lets him think he is actually an alternate. Harold soon throws a big party for the Fall Frolic and is happy at his seeming popularity, even though his only baste-stitched tuxedo falls apart, despite the best efforts of the college tailor. When the campus cad tries to force himself on Peggy, the now disheveled Harold fights him. In retaliation, the cad tells him his true role on the football team. Although shattered by the revelation, Harold is consoled by Peggy, who tells him that people will like him if he will just be himself. A short time later, during the big game, Harold finally gains an opportunity to prove himself on the football field by scoring the winning goal after injuries leave the team short-handed. Finally able to be himself, Harold wins popularity as well as the love of ... +


Harold Lamb, an eager, uncoordinated college freshman who yearns to be the most popular man on campus, incurs contempt from a college cad and others when he emulates the demeanor of a movie college man. He tries to win friendship by spending most of his college money treating his classmates, but is only truly liked by Peggy, the daughter of his landlady. Harold, who now likes to go by the nickname "Speedy," tries further measures to make himself popular and attempts to join the football team. Because the football coach admires the unathletic Harold's spirit, he makes him the team waterboy but lets him think he is actually an alternate. Harold soon throws a big party for the Fall Frolic and is happy at his seeming popularity, even though his only baste-stitched tuxedo falls apart, despite the best efforts of the college tailor. When the campus cad tries to force himself on Peggy, the now disheveled Harold fights him. In retaliation, the cad tells him his true role on the football team. Although shattered by the revelation, Harold is consoled by Peggy, who tells him that people will like him if he will just be himself. A short time later, during the big game, Harold finally gains an opportunity to prove himself on the football field by scoring the winning goal after injuries leave the team short-handed. Finally able to be himself, Harold wins popularity as well as the love of Peggy. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.