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HISTORY

Following four months of pre-production, the 4 Jun 1921 Moving Picture World announced that Mary Pickford had begun filming Little Lord Fauntleroy, with her brother, Jack Pickford, serving as co-director with Alfred E. Green. The project, which required Pickford to perform two roles, was expected to be her most expensive endeavor to date. Although the Feb--Jul 1921 Motion Picture Magazine and Mar--Aug 1921 Picture-Play Magazine suggested that filming was initially intended to take place in England, the 10 Sep 1921 Moving Picture World stated that most of the picture was shot at Brunton Studios in Hollywood, CA. According to the 25 Jun 1921 Moving Picture World, the elaborate interior set of “Dorincourt Castle” was more than 226 feet in length, and required more than 100 tons of plaster to construct. Castle exteriors were shot in Burlingame, CA. The 11 Jun 1921 Moving Picture World announced that principal photography was expected to be completed around 1 Jul 1921.
       A story published in the Jul--Dec 1921 issue of Photoplay claimed that Pickford accidentally pulled a tooth, which was tied to a prop door with string for a scene at Dorincourt Castle. The picture also featured the film debut of Pickford’s niece, also named Mary Pickford, according to the Jul--Dec 1921 Photoplay.
       According to the 27 Aug 1921 Moving Picture World, Pickford completed much of the post-production work in New York City, where she was set to attend the 28 Aug 1921 premiere of The Three Musketeers (see entry), starring her husband, Douglas Fairbanks. The 17 Sep 1921 Exhibitors ... More Less

Following four months of pre-production, the 4 Jun 1921 Moving Picture World announced that Mary Pickford had begun filming Little Lord Fauntleroy, with her brother, Jack Pickford, serving as co-director with Alfred E. Green. The project, which required Pickford to perform two roles, was expected to be her most expensive endeavor to date. Although the Feb--Jul 1921 Motion Picture Magazine and Mar--Aug 1921 Picture-Play Magazine suggested that filming was initially intended to take place in England, the 10 Sep 1921 Moving Picture World stated that most of the picture was shot at Brunton Studios in Hollywood, CA. According to the 25 Jun 1921 Moving Picture World, the elaborate interior set of “Dorincourt Castle” was more than 226 feet in length, and required more than 100 tons of plaster to construct. Castle exteriors were shot in Burlingame, CA. The 11 Jun 1921 Moving Picture World announced that principal photography was expected to be completed around 1 Jul 1921.
       A story published in the Jul--Dec 1921 issue of Photoplay claimed that Pickford accidentally pulled a tooth, which was tied to a prop door with string for a scene at Dorincourt Castle. The picture also featured the film debut of Pickford’s niece, also named Mary Pickford, according to the Jul--Dec 1921 Photoplay.
       According to the 27 Aug 1921 Moving Picture World, Pickford completed much of the post-production work in New York City, where she was set to attend the 28 Aug 1921 premiere of The Three Musketeers (see entry), starring her husband, Douglas Fairbanks. The 17 Sep 1921 Exhibitors Trade Review reported that Little Lord Fauntleroy premiered at the Apollo Theatre, accompanied by a special musical prologue presentation. The 7 Sep 1921 NYT stated that the Broadway engagement was set to begin the following week, on 15 Sep 1921.
       Although the picture proved popular among audiences, the Jul 1921 Picture-Play Magazine indicated that some censors objected to Pickford’s appearance in boys’ clothing.
       The Jun 1922 issue of The Educational Screen listed Little Lord Fauntleroy as one of the year’s “Fifteen Best Productions (of those reviewed so far).” It said of the film: “Pickford has given to the screen many a characterization, humorous and serious, but in no [other] film has she had the opportunity to demonstrate how she can blend the two....We do not hesitate to say that Little Lord Fauntleroy in company with The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse present the two best American films of this or any other year so far.”
       For information on other films based on the Frances Hodgson Burnett novel, please consult the entry for the 1936 United Artists release Little Lord Fauntleroy , directed by John Cromwell and starring Freddie Bartholomew and Dolores Costello in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
17 Sep 1921
p. 1113.
Motion Picture Magazine
Feb--Jul 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
4 Jun 1921
p. 528.
Moving Picture World
11 Jun 1921
p. 619.
Moving Picture World
25 Jun 1921
p. 832.
Moving Picture World
27 Aug 1921
p. 918.
Moving Picture World
10 Sep 1921
p. 159.
New York Times
7 Sep 1921
p. 21.
New York Times
16 Sep 1921
p. 17.
Photoplay
Jul--Dec 1921.
---
Photoplay
Jul--Dec 1921
p. 86.
Picture-Play Magazine
Mar--Aug 1921.
---
Picture-Play Magazine
Jul 1921.
---
The Educational Screen
Jun 1922
p. 203.
The Photodramatist
Jun 1921
p. 27.
Variety
23 Sep 1921
p. 42.
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 November 1921
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: early September 1921
New York opening: 15 September 1921
Production Date:
late May or early June--1 July 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Mary Pickford Co.
Copyright Date:
29 November 1921
Copyright Number:
LP17240
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
9,984
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The widow of Captain Errol, youngest son of the Earl of Dorincourt, and her young son, Cedric, live in New York City in the early 1880's barely able to subsist. The earl, how heirless, commissions his solicitor, Haversham, to bring young Cedric from America to be trained for the title of Lord Fauntleroy. When they arrive at the castle, the mother (Dearest), wrongly accused of marrying for pecuniary reasons, is forced to live outside the castle while Cedric with his innocent and childish wit captivates the earl and wins the hearts of his royal guests. Haversham appears with a woman who claims that her son is the nearest relatives of Bevis, the eldest son, and she demands the title for him. When New York papers print the story with photographs, Cedric's friends--Dick, Hobbs, and Mrs. McGinty--journey to England to expose the conspiracy. The earl is overjoyed at the news, and there is a reconciliation between Dearest and the earl; all three live happily together in the ... +


The widow of Captain Errol, youngest son of the Earl of Dorincourt, and her young son, Cedric, live in New York City in the early 1880's barely able to subsist. The earl, how heirless, commissions his solicitor, Haversham, to bring young Cedric from America to be trained for the title of Lord Fauntleroy. When they arrive at the castle, the mother (Dearest), wrongly accused of marrying for pecuniary reasons, is forced to live outside the castle while Cedric with his innocent and childish wit captivates the earl and wins the hearts of his royal guests. Haversham appears with a woman who claims that her son is the nearest relatives of Bevis, the eldest son, and she demands the title for him. When New York papers print the story with photographs, Cedric's friends--Dick, Hobbs, and Mrs. McGinty--journey to England to expose the conspiracy. The earl is overjoyed at the news, and there is a reconciliation between Dearest and the earl; all three live happily together in the castle. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.