Love Never Dies (1921)

Melodrama | 14 November 1921

Director:

King Vidor

Writer:

King Vidor

Cinematographer:

Max Dupont

Production Company:

King W. Vidor Productions
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HISTORY

For the year 1921, writer-director King Vidor was set to make four “special productions” for Associated Producers, according to an item in the 26 Feb 1921 Exhibitors Herald. The first, Love Never Dies, was expected to begin shooting “almost immediately.” However, casting was still underway in Apr 1921, according to a 9 Apr 1921 Motion Picture News brief.
       Principal photography took place at Thomas H. Ince Studios in Culver City, CA, as noted in the 6 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News. Some scenes were filmed at King Vidor’s Los Angeles, CA, studio, “Vidor Village,” according to the May 1921 issue of Picture-Play Magazine, and location filming on the East Coast took place in Washington Square and the Fifth Avenue shopping district of New York City. The 6 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News stated that filming was nearing its conclusion. A month of editing was slated to take place at Ince Studios, as noted in the 17 Sep 1921 Motion Picture News and Oct 1921 Photodramatist.
       The 24 Sep 1921 issue of Exhibitors Herald noted filmmakers’ claims that the “most spectacular railroad wreck ever filmed” took place during production, on a railroad trestle in a mountainous area near the Salmon River in ID. The trestle, “used heavily only in the lumbering season,” was weakened based on the advice of engineers. However, an “unexpected freshet” further weakened the structure, which set to collapse under the weight of an unmanned train. As originally planned, the train and two automobiles were supposed to crash into the stream below. However, the trestle gave way easier ... More Less

For the year 1921, writer-director King Vidor was set to make four “special productions” for Associated Producers, according to an item in the 26 Feb 1921 Exhibitors Herald. The first, Love Never Dies, was expected to begin shooting “almost immediately.” However, casting was still underway in Apr 1921, according to a 9 Apr 1921 Motion Picture News brief.
       Principal photography took place at Thomas H. Ince Studios in Culver City, CA, as noted in the 6 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News. Some scenes were filmed at King Vidor’s Los Angeles, CA, studio, “Vidor Village,” according to the May 1921 issue of Picture-Play Magazine, and location filming on the East Coast took place in Washington Square and the Fifth Avenue shopping district of New York City. The 6 Aug 1921 Motion Picture News stated that filming was nearing its conclusion. A month of editing was slated to take place at Ince Studios, as noted in the 17 Sep 1921 Motion Picture News and Oct 1921 Photodramatist.
       The 24 Sep 1921 issue of Exhibitors Herald noted filmmakers’ claims that the “most spectacular railroad wreck ever filmed” took place during production, on a railroad trestle in a mountainous area near the Salmon River in ID. The trestle, “used heavily only in the lumbering season,” was weakened based on the advice of engineers. However, an “unexpected freshet” further weakened the structure, which set to collapse under the weight of an unmanned train. As originally planned, the train and two automobiles were supposed to crash into the stream below. However, the trestle gave way easier than expected, and six automobiles, in addition to the train, were sent into the water. A second, manned, locomotive was spared. The 17 Sep 1921 Motion Picture News reported that the filming of the train wreck brought the production to near completion.
       An advertisement in the 28 Oct 1921 Var announced that Associated Producers’ films would henceforth be distributed by First National Pictures, Inc., and Love Never Dies would be available to all exhibitors on a “wide open market plan.”
       According to the 16 Dec 1921 Var review, Love Never Dies featured an “extraordinary cast” and “exceptional photoplay,” but actor Lloyd Hughes’s makeup failed to age him “with the passing of time.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
26 Feb 1921.
---
Exhibitors Herald
24 Sep 1921.
---
Film Daily
20 Nov 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
9 Apr 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
6 Aug 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
17 Sep 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
29 Oct 1921.
---
Photodramatist
Oct 1921.
---
Picture-Play Magazine
May 1921.
---
Variety
16 Dec 1921
p. 36.
Variety
28 Oct 1921.
---
Variety
16 Dec 1921.
---
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 November 1921
Production Date:
completed early August 1921
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,751
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

The happy marriage of John Trott and Tilly Whaley is ended by Tilly's father when he learns of the notorious reputation of John's "mother." Because John assumes that Tilly, who was taken home by Mr. Whaley, left of her own accord, he leaves the small North Carolina town to work in the city. John becomes successful and wealthy, while Mr. Whaley prevails upon Tilly, who believes that John died in a train wreck, to marry Joel Eperson. While visiting Ridgeville John finds that Tilly's thoughts are still of him, but he decides to depart gracefully. Joel also perceives what his wife really wants, and he commits suicide. John and Tilly are reunited with everyone's blessings and with the new knowledge that Liz Trott is not related to John in any ... +


The happy marriage of John Trott and Tilly Whaley is ended by Tilly's father when he learns of the notorious reputation of John's "mother." Because John assumes that Tilly, who was taken home by Mr. Whaley, left of her own accord, he leaves the small North Carolina town to work in the city. John becomes successful and wealthy, while Mr. Whaley prevails upon Tilly, who believes that John died in a train wreck, to marry Joel Eperson. While visiting Ridgeville John finds that Tilly's thoughts are still of him, but he decides to depart gracefully. Joel also perceives what his wife really wants, and he commits suicide. John and Tilly are reunited with everyone's blessings and with the new knowledge that Liz Trott is not related to John in any way. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Domestic


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.