Not So Dumb (1930)

75 mins | Comedy | 17 January 1930

Director:

King Vidor

Cinematographer:

Oliver T. Marsh

Editor:

Blanche Sewell

Production Designer:

Cedric Gibbons

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

The 5 Aug 1929 FD announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had acquired dialogue rights to Dulcy, the 1923 First National Pictures silent film starring Constance Talmadge, which was adapted from the 1921 play by George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly. Five days later, the 10 Aug 1929 Motion Picture News reported that King Vidor would direct the picture, and Marion Davies was cast in the leading role of “Dulcy.”
       Referring to the picture as Dulcy, the 10 Sep 1929 FD indicated that principal photography would begin that week at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA.
       According to the 26 Oct 1929 Exhibitors Herald-World, the opening driving scenes were filmed near Pasadena, CA. An eight-cylinder engine automobile was required, since the first attempt using a six-cylinder car caused interference with the sound - its “engine explosions” were “out of time with the high sound-wave frequency of the microphone.” A platform was built over the front bumper, where cameras and microphones were mounted, and cables were run to a sound recording truck that drove ahead. Actor Elliott Nugent had to maintain a speed of twenty miles an hour in his roadster to keep the pace even with the sound truck.
       The 26 Nov 1929 FD reported that filming had completed. The title change to Not So Dumb was announced in the 9 Dec 1929 FD.
       The picture was favored by critics. The 9 Feb 1930 FD review deemed Not So Dumb a “first-rate comedy brightly done,” declaring that Marion Davies “proves conclusively that she is a comedienne.” The Jun 1930 ... More Less

The 5 Aug 1929 FD announced that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had acquired dialogue rights to Dulcy, the 1923 First National Pictures silent film starring Constance Talmadge, which was adapted from the 1921 play by George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly. Five days later, the 10 Aug 1929 Motion Picture News reported that King Vidor would direct the picture, and Marion Davies was cast in the leading role of “Dulcy.”
       Referring to the picture as Dulcy, the 10 Sep 1929 FD indicated that principal photography would begin that week at M-G-M Studios in Culver City, CA.
       According to the 26 Oct 1929 Exhibitors Herald-World, the opening driving scenes were filmed near Pasadena, CA. An eight-cylinder engine automobile was required, since the first attempt using a six-cylinder car caused interference with the sound - its “engine explosions” were “out of time with the high sound-wave frequency of the microphone.” A platform was built over the front bumper, where cameras and microphones were mounted, and cables were run to a sound recording truck that drove ahead. Actor Elliott Nugent had to maintain a speed of twenty miles an hour in his roadster to keep the pace even with the sound truck.
       The 26 Nov 1929 FD reported that filming had completed. The title change to Not So Dumb was announced in the 9 Dec 1929 FD.
       The picture was favored by critics. The 9 Feb 1930 FD review deemed Not So Dumb a “first-rate comedy brightly done,” declaring that Marion Davies “proves conclusively that she is a comedienne.” The Jun 1930 Picture Play also praised Davies, stating: “her work is so clever you want to choke her while laughing at her dumb efforts to be the little fixer between her fiancé and his boss.”
       M-G-M produced another adaptation in 1940 titled Dulcy, directed by S. Sylvan Sullivan and starring Ann Sothern and Ian Hunter (see entry). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald-World
26 Oct 1929
p. 42.
Exhibitors Herald-World
15 Feb 1930
p. 29.
Film Daily
5 Aug 1929
p. 1.
Film Daily
10 Sep 1929
p. 6.
Film Daily
26 Nov 1929
p. 5.
Film Daily
9 Dec 1929
p. 1.
Film Daily
9 Feb 1930
p. 13.
Life
14 Feb 1930
p. 22.
Motion Picture News
10 Aug 1929
p. 608.
New York Times
8 Feb 1930
p. 12.
Picture Play
Jun 1930
p. 66.
Variety
12 Feb 1930
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
SOUND
Rec eng
Rec eng
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Dulcy by George S. Kaufman and Marc Connelly (New York,13 Aug 1921).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Dulcy
Release Date:
17 January 1930
Production Date:
mid September--late November 1929
Copyright Claimant:
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distributing Corp.
Copyright Date:
17 February 1930
Copyright Number:
LP1076
Physical Properties:
Sound
Movietone
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si.
Duration(in mins):
75
Length(in feet):
7,650 , 6,875
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dulcy, the slightly wacky but well-meaning fiancée of Gordon, an anxiously up-and-coming business buff, is bent on hostessing a party to bring her future hubby's potential partners into line. The crusty Mr. Forbes is the object of their fawning flattery, which backfires at every turn; and the obstreperous Van Dyke is a mad financier whose favor is finally surrendered so as not to interfere with his lechery. But it is the scatterbrained Dulcy who in the end does all the wrong things for the right reasons and secures her fiancé's financial future and her own "world-without-end" ... +


Dulcy, the slightly wacky but well-meaning fiancée of Gordon, an anxiously up-and-coming business buff, is bent on hostessing a party to bring her future hubby's potential partners into line. The crusty Mr. Forbes is the object of their fawning flattery, which backfires at every turn; and the obstreperous Van Dyke is a mad financier whose favor is finally surrendered so as not to interfere with his lechery. But it is the scatterbrained Dulcy who in the end does all the wrong things for the right reasons and secures her fiancé's financial future and her own "world-without-end" bargain. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.