They Had To See Paris (1929)

93 mins | Comedy-drama | 8 September 1929

Full page view
HISTORY

Will Rogers is listed above the title on the opening title card, then again in the list of players, where his name appears last, reading "and WILL ROGERS." They Had to See Paris was the first sound and dialogue film of the noted humorist. The picture also was the first film of French-Canadian actress Fifi D'Orsay (1904--1983), whose surname was listed as "Dorsay" in the onscreen credits. Most reviews list D'Orsay's character name as "Claudine," but she is called "Fifi" within the ... More Less

Will Rogers is listed above the title on the opening title card, then again in the list of players, where his name appears last, reading "and WILL ROGERS." They Had to See Paris was the first sound and dialogue film of the noted humorist. The picture also was the first film of French-Canadian actress Fifi D'Orsay (1904--1983), whose surname was listed as "Dorsay" in the onscreen credits. Most reviews list D'Orsay's character name as "Claudine," but she is called "Fifi" within the film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
EHW
7 Dec 1929
p. 54.
Film Daily
13 Oct 1929
p. 9.
Film Daily
7 Feb 1930
p. 1.
New York Times
12 Oct 1929
p. 11.
Variety
16 Oct 1929
p. 17.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Frank Borzage's production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
By [Dial]
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Settings
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
PRODUCTION MISC
Stage mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel They Had To See Paris by Homer Croy (New York, 1926).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"I Could Do It for You," words and music by Sidney Mitchell, Archie Gottler and Con Conrad.
DETAILS
Release Date:
8 September 1929
Copyright Claimant:
Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
11 September 1929
Copyright Number:
LP675
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric System
Black and White
Sound, also silent
Also si.
Duration(in mins):
93
Length(in feet):
8,602
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Pike Peters, an affable garage owner and Ford salesman in Claremore, Oklahoma, strikes it rich in oil. Although Pike is uninterested in the trappings of wealth, his much-loved wife Idy wants to use the money to help the family acquire culture. Over Pike's better judgment, he, Idy and their grown children, Opal and Ross, move to Paris. Several months later, the social-climbing Idy tries to find a suitable husband for Opal, while Ross indulges in the Parisian nightlife. One evening, at a nightclub where a chanteuse named Fifi attracts the bashful Pike's attention, Opal is introduced to the Marquis de Brissac, a fortune-hunter put forward to Idy by the mercenary Miss Mason as an acceptable son-in-law. As the women fawn over the Marquis, Pike is distracted when he sees Ross enter the club with a flashily dressed young Parisian girl. Ross introduces his father to the girl, Fleuril, then hastily leaves. Fifi, who lives in the same building as Fleuril, tells Pike she is “a nice girl,” but Pike is not convinced. Sometime later, Idy convinces Pike to buy a French chateau that has been recommended to her by the Marquis. When Idy hosts a formal dinner party there in honor of the impoverished Russian Grand Duke Makiall, who is being paid for an appearance, Pike balks at attending the party. He makes a scene, which causes Idy to faint, but Makiall enjoys Pike's honesty and spends the evening laughing and drinking with him. The next morning, the Marquis and his mother pretend not to have been offended by Pike's behavior, but Idy will not forgive him. When the ... +


Pike Peters, an affable garage owner and Ford salesman in Claremore, Oklahoma, strikes it rich in oil. Although Pike is uninterested in the trappings of wealth, his much-loved wife Idy wants to use the money to help the family acquire culture. Over Pike's better judgment, he, Idy and their grown children, Opal and Ross, move to Paris. Several months later, the social-climbing Idy tries to find a suitable husband for Opal, while Ross indulges in the Parisian nightlife. One evening, at a nightclub where a chanteuse named Fifi attracts the bashful Pike's attention, Opal is introduced to the Marquis de Brissac, a fortune-hunter put forward to Idy by the mercenary Miss Mason as an acceptable son-in-law. As the women fawn over the Marquis, Pike is distracted when he sees Ross enter the club with a flashily dressed young Parisian girl. Ross introduces his father to the girl, Fleuril, then hastily leaves. Fifi, who lives in the same building as Fleuril, tells Pike she is “a nice girl,” but Pike is not convinced. Sometime later, Idy convinces Pike to buy a French chateau that has been recommended to her by the Marquis. When Idy hosts a formal dinner party there in honor of the impoverished Russian Grand Duke Makiall, who is being paid for an appearance, Pike balks at attending the party. He makes a scene, which causes Idy to faint, but Makiall enjoys Pike's honesty and spends the evening laughing and drinking with him. The next morning, the Marquis and his mother pretend not to have been offended by Pike's behavior, but Idy will not forgive him. When the Marquis demands a large dowry to marry Opal, and Pike refuses to pay, Idy lashes out, saying that she is ashamed of him. Deeply hurt, Pike decides to leave the chateau and return alone to Paris. Sometime later, when Pike is checking for mail at the American Express office, he runs into Ross, who invites him to his apartment in the Latin Quarter. Although Ross is in love, Pike is shaken when he realizes that his son and Fleuril have been living together. Telling Ross that he cannot bring a girl like Fleuril back home, Pike leaves, but runs into Fifi on the stairs. She is happy to see Pike and invites him into her apartment for tea. She sings for him and cheers him up, then suggests that they go together for a holiday. While she is packing, Fleuril and Ross come downstairs and Pike pretends that he and Fifi are going to Deauville together. Ross is shocked, especially when Pike tells him not to be so Puritanical. After Ross and Fleuril leave, Pike says goodbye to Fifi and thanks her for her help. Ross then goes to the chateau to tell Idy, who is hurt and shocked that Pike has succumbed to the charms of another woman. Back in Paris, as Pike is writing a note to Idy saying that he is returning home, she, Ross and Opal arrive. Idy and the children apologize to Pike and tell them that they want to go back with him and resume their old life in Oklahoma. Pike happily embraces his family and looks forward to going home. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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