Uncharted Seas (1921)

Romance | 25 April 1921

Director:

Wesley Ruggles

Cinematographer:

John F. Seitz

Production Designer:

John Holden

Production Company:

Metro Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The Woman Who Went Away was a working title, according to an item in the 29 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News. The copyright title is listed as The Uncharted Sea.
       Several contemporary sources incorrectly referred to Uncharted Seas as Unchartered Seas, including the 20 Oct 1920 Wid’s Daily, which announced that Bayard Veiller, director of productions for Metro Pictures Corp., had purchased film rights to John Fleming Wilson’s short story, “The Uncharted Sea.” An 11 Dec 1920 Motion Picture News item announced that Rudolph Valentino would star opposite Alice Lake, with Wesley Ruggles directing. Two days later, the 13 Dec 1920 Wid’s Daily noted that scenarist George Elwood Jenks had completed the script, his first under a new contract with Metro.
       On 18 Dec 1920, Moving Picture World stated that filming was underway, and John Fleming Wilson had already visited set in Los Angeles, CA. A conflicting report in the 1 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News reported that principal photography would begin “within a few days” at Metro’s studio lot in Hollywood, CA. The 25 Dec 1920 Motion Picture News noted that location shooting would take place in “the Arctic regions” in early 1921. While in the North, Ruggles planned to film the Aurora Borealis.
       As stated in a 29 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News brief, seven Alaskan dogs were “imported from the snow country,” and would figure heavily in “the Northern settings for the production.” In addition to Arctic locations, some snowy exteriors were shot near Flagstaff, AZ. According to a 1 Jan ... More Less

The Woman Who Went Away was a working title, according to an item in the 29 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News. The copyright title is listed as The Uncharted Sea.
       Several contemporary sources incorrectly referred to Uncharted Seas as Unchartered Seas, including the 20 Oct 1920 Wid’s Daily, which announced that Bayard Veiller, director of productions for Metro Pictures Corp., had purchased film rights to John Fleming Wilson’s short story, “The Uncharted Sea.” An 11 Dec 1920 Motion Picture News item announced that Rudolph Valentino would star opposite Alice Lake, with Wesley Ruggles directing. Two days later, the 13 Dec 1920 Wid’s Daily noted that scenarist George Elwood Jenks had completed the script, his first under a new contract with Metro.
       On 18 Dec 1920, Moving Picture World stated that filming was underway, and John Fleming Wilson had already visited set in Los Angeles, CA. A conflicting report in the 1 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News reported that principal photography would begin “within a few days” at Metro’s studio lot in Hollywood, CA. The 25 Dec 1920 Motion Picture News noted that location shooting would take place in “the Arctic regions” in early 1921. While in the North, Ruggles planned to film the Aurora Borealis.
       As stated in a 29 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News brief, seven Alaskan dogs were “imported from the snow country,” and would figure heavily in “the Northern settings for the production.” In addition to Arctic locations, some snowy exteriors were shot near Flagstaff, AZ. According to a 1 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News brief, sets included a reproduction of San Francisco, CA’s Chinatown.
       The 15 Jan 1921 Motion Picture News “Hollywood Hokum” column reported that an actor was under physician’s care after being made to eat sandwiches and glasses of milk “all day long” during a re-shoot. Several weeks later, the 5 Mar 1921 Motion Picture News reported that cast and crew were exhausted after two weeks of “strenuous” shooting in and around Flagstaff. Final scenes would be filmed at Metro studios as soon as the company had time to recuperate. Alice Lake reportedly suffered a sprained ankle and a cold; Ruggles endured a cracked rib “from a fall on the ice”; and others were recovering from various bruises and sprains.
       An item in the 24 Dec 1921 issue of Moving Picture World chided the Goodwin Theatre in Newark, NJ, for advertising the film as Unchartered Seas.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
7 Jan 1922.
---
Motion Picture News
11 Dec 1920.
---
Motion Picture News
25 Dec 1920.
---
Motion Picture News
1 Jan 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
15 Jan 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
29 Jan 1921.
---
Motion Picture News
5 Mar 1921.
---
Moving Picture World
18 Dec 1920.
---
Moving Picture World
24 Dec 1921.
---
Variety
3 Jun 1921.
---
Wid's Daily
20 Oct 1920.
---
Wid's Daily
13 Dec 1920.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "The Uncharted Sea," by John Fleming Wilson in Munsey's Magazine (Sep 1920).
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Woman Who Went Away
The Uncharted Sea
Release Date:
25 April 1921
Copyright Claimant:
Metro Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
26 April 1921
Copyright Number:
LP16431
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,803
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Persuaded by her father-in-law to give her negligent and drunken husband one more chance, Lucretia Eastman accompanies him on an expedition to the Arctic Circle, but Eastman turns back out of fear. Another ship, commanded by Frank Underwood, who loves Lucretia, arrives on the same mission, and she joins it. While Eastman denounces his wife and obtains a divorce, she and her lover are imprisoned for months in the icebound ship. After a trek across the frozen waste, they are ... +


Persuaded by her father-in-law to give her negligent and drunken husband one more chance, Lucretia Eastman accompanies him on an expedition to the Arctic Circle, but Eastman turns back out of fear. Another ship, commanded by Frank Underwood, who loves Lucretia, arrives on the same mission, and she joins it. While Eastman denounces his wife and obtains a divorce, she and her lover are imprisoned for months in the icebound ship. After a trek across the frozen waste, they are rescued. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.