Why Worry? (1923)

60 mins | Comedy | 16 September 1923

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HISTORY

A 13 Jan 1923 Motion Picture News brief announced that sets had been built for comedian Harold Lloyd’s next picture. Principal photography began sometime in Jan 1923, as confirmed by a 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review news item indicating that Lloyd had finished production after seven months at the Hal E. Roach Studios in Culver City, CA.
       On 18 Mar 1923, Exhibitors Trade Review described producer Hal Roach’s plans to expand his studios, but suggested that the team of people working with Harold Lloyd would be unaffected by changes. Seven months later, Lloyd and Roach decided to officially end their long-standing business association. The 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that the separation was amicable. Lloyd planned to form his own company, and Roach agreed to release all those who worked closely with the comedian from their contracts. Why Worry? thus capped a succession of popular Roach–Lloyd collaborations, including A Sailor-Made Man (1921, see entry), Grandma’s Boy (1922, see entry), Dr. Jack (1922, see entry), and Safety Last! (1923, see entry).
       In anticipation of the picture’s Sep 1923 release, an 11 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review noted that Why Worry? would mark the screen debut of actor John Aasen, who was reportedly over eight feet tall and weighed 460 pounds. The trade journal also indicated that writers Ted Wilde and Tim Whelan had assisted Hal Roach and Sam Taylor with writing the story and scenario. However, contemporary reviews consistently credited Taylor, alone, as writer. On 4 Oct 1923, FD reported that New York ... More Less

A 13 Jan 1923 Motion Picture News brief announced that sets had been built for comedian Harold Lloyd’s next picture. Principal photography began sometime in Jan 1923, as confirmed by a 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review news item indicating that Lloyd had finished production after seven months at the Hal E. Roach Studios in Culver City, CA.
       On 18 Mar 1923, Exhibitors Trade Review described producer Hal Roach’s plans to expand his studios, but suggested that the team of people working with Harold Lloyd would be unaffected by changes. Seven months later, Lloyd and Roach decided to officially end their long-standing business association. The 7 Jul 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review indicated that the separation was amicable. Lloyd planned to form his own company, and Roach agreed to release all those who worked closely with the comedian from their contracts. Why Worry? thus capped a succession of popular Roach–Lloyd collaborations, including A Sailor-Made Man (1921, see entry), Grandma’s Boy (1922, see entry), Dr. Jack (1922, see entry), and Safety Last! (1923, see entry).
       In anticipation of the picture’s Sep 1923 release, an 11 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review noted that Why Worry? would mark the screen debut of actor John Aasen, who was reportedly over eight feet tall and weighed 460 pounds. The trade journal also indicated that writers Ted Wilde and Tim Whelan had assisted Hal Roach and Sam Taylor with writing the story and scenario. However, contemporary reviews consistently credited Taylor, alone, as writer. On 4 Oct 1923, FD reported that New York playwright Owen Davis intended to sue Harold Lloyd for plagiarism, claiming that Why Worry? was an infringement of his stage play, The Nervous Wreck, which Hal Roach had seen during the play’s first run on the West Coast. Lloyd’s legal representatives countered that making a comedy about a hypochondriac was hardly a unique idea. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
18 Mar 1923.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
7 Jul 1923.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
11 Aug 1923.
---
Exhibitors Trade Review
15 Sep 1923.
---
Film Daily
9 Sep 1923.
---
Film Daily
4 Oct 1923
pp. 1-2.
Motion Picture News
13 Jan 1923.
---
Motion Picture News
15 Sep 1923.
---
Variety
6 Sep 1923
p. 23.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
Pres
WRITER
Story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 September 1923
Production Date:
January--July 1923
Copyright Claimant:
Hal E. Roach Studios
Copyright Date:
11 August 1923
Copyright Number:
LU19294
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
60
Length(in feet):
5,500
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Wealthy young hypochondriac Harold Van Pelham visits a South American "island of paradise" and encounters a revolution which he believes is staged for his entertainment. Van Pelham enlists the help of Colosso, a giant bodyguard, when he sees that the revolt is genuine; and together they defend themselves against the revolutionaries. After quelling the revolution and receiving the ministration of his charming nurse, Van Pelham discovers he has exchanged his imaginary illnesses for a real ... +


Wealthy young hypochondriac Harold Van Pelham visits a South American "island of paradise" and encounters a revolution which he believes is staged for his entertainment. Van Pelham enlists the help of Colosso, a giant bodyguard, when he sees that the revolt is genuine; and together they defend themselves against the revolutionaries. After quelling the revolution and receiving the ministration of his charming nurse, Van Pelham discovers he has exchanged his imaginary illnesses for a real sweetheart. +

GENRE
Genre:


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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