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HISTORY

The start of principal photography was announced in the 26 Jul 1919 Wid’s Daily. The 9 Aug 1919 Motion Picture News noted that production took place at Biograph Studios in Bronx, NY. Lead actor Eugene O’Brien claimed that he was often distracted during production by entertainer Elsie Janis, who was working on a neighboring set. Filming was completed in early Sep 1919, according to articles in the 6 Sep 1919 Exhibitors Herald and Motography and the 13 Sep 1919 Motion Picture World. Within days, the 20 Sep 1919 Exhibitors Herald reported that O’Brien was being treated for an ear abscess.
       Sealed Hearts was released on 16 Nov 1919, followed by an opening that same week at the Stanley Theatre in Philadelphia, PA, and a 21 Feb 1920 Los Angeles opening at the Alvarado Theatre. Critics for the 14 Nov 1919 Var, 15 Nov 1919 Motion Picture News, and Feb 1920 Photoplay agreed that the film did not adequately showcase O’Brien, who was overshadowed by co-star Robert Edeson. Some reviews referred to the characters named "Prentiss" as "Marchbanks," and the characters named "Gray" as "Rutherfords."
       Letters to the Jun 1920 and Jan 1921 editions of Photoplay revealed two continuity problems with the picture. The first noted a scene in which O’Brien climbed a flight of stairs wearing a vest, but arrived at the top without it. Another sequence showed actress Lucille Lee Stewart suffering a sprained right ankle, and later saying her left ankle was injured.
       The scenario ...

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The start of principal photography was announced in the 26 Jul 1919 Wid’s Daily. The 9 Aug 1919 Motion Picture News noted that production took place at Biograph Studios in Bronx, NY. Lead actor Eugene O’Brien claimed that he was often distracted during production by entertainer Elsie Janis, who was working on a neighboring set. Filming was completed in early Sep 1919, according to articles in the 6 Sep 1919 Exhibitors Herald and Motography and the 13 Sep 1919 Motion Picture World. Within days, the 20 Sep 1919 Exhibitors Herald reported that O’Brien was being treated for an ear abscess.
       Sealed Hearts was released on 16 Nov 1919, followed by an opening that same week at the Stanley Theatre in Philadelphia, PA, and a 21 Feb 1920 Los Angeles opening at the Alvarado Theatre. Critics for the 14 Nov 1919 Var, 15 Nov 1919 Motion Picture News, and Feb 1920 Photoplay agreed that the film did not adequately showcase O’Brien, who was overshadowed by co-star Robert Edeson. Some reviews referred to the characters named "Prentiss" as "Marchbanks," and the characters named "Gray" as "Rutherfords."
       Letters to the Jun 1920 and Jan 1921 editions of Photoplay revealed two continuity problems with the picture. The first noted a scene in which O’Brien climbed a flight of stairs wearing a vest, but arrived at the top without it. Another sequence showed actress Lucille Lee Stewart suffering a sprained right ankle, and later saying her left ankle was injured.
       The scenario was adapted by Joseph Bernard Rethy as a short story for the Dec 1919 Picture-Play.
       An item in the 15 Dec 1919 Motion Picture Times stated that music publisher Irving Berlin, Inc., featured O’Brien on the cover of sheet music for the song, Sealed Hearts, named after the film.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Camera
21 Feb 1920
p. 8
Exhibitors Herald
20 Sep 1919
p. 44
Exhibitors Herald and Motography
16 Aug 1919
p. 78
Exhibitors Herald and Motography
6 Sep 1919
p. 70
Exhibitors Trade Review
8 Nov 1919
p. 1981
Motion Picture News
9 Aug 1919
p. 1289
Motion Picture News
13 Sep 1919
p. 2246
Motion Picture News
15 Nov 1919
p. 3644
Motion Picture News
22 Nov 1919
p. 3747
Motion Picture News
10 Jan 1920
p. 686
Motion Picture Times
15 Dec 1919
p. 14
Moving Picture World
15 Nov 1919
p. 362
Photoplay
Feb 1920
p. 115
Photoplay
Jun 1920
p. 76
Photoplay
Jan 1921
p. 78
Picture-Play
Dec 1919
p. 63
Variety
14 Nov 1919
p. 59
Wid's Daily
26 Jul 1919
---
DETAILS
Release Date:
16 November 1919
Premiere Information:
Philadelphia opening: week of 16 Nov 1919; Los Angeles opening: 21 Feb 1920
Production Date:
late Jul--early Sep 1919
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Selznick Pictures Corp.
26 October 1919
LP14365
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Frank Prentiss, a multi-millionaire who hates and distrusts women, convinces his adopted son, Jack, that they are detrimental to a man's success. The overworked Frank is forced to rest at the country home of his friend, Mr. Gray, where he meets and falls in love with the host's daughter, Kate. She refuses his proposal at first, but later accepts because her father, who has two younger children, is experiencing financial difficulties. Following the wedding, Kate is subjected to Frank’s verbal abuse and seeks solace with Jack. Their friendship enrages Frank, who tortures them with his accusations. During a dinner party, Frank accuses Jack and Kate of being lovers in front of the male guests. Jack is restrained from accosting his father, but Frank suffers a fatal heart attack. Later, Jack and Kate fall in love and are ...

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Frank Prentiss, a multi-millionaire who hates and distrusts women, convinces his adopted son, Jack, that they are detrimental to a man's success. The overworked Frank is forced to rest at the country home of his friend, Mr. Gray, where he meets and falls in love with the host's daughter, Kate. She refuses his proposal at first, but later accepts because her father, who has two younger children, is experiencing financial difficulties. Following the wedding, Kate is subjected to Frank’s verbal abuse and seeks solace with Jack. Their friendship enrages Frank, who tortures them with his accusations. During a dinner party, Frank accuses Jack and Kate of being lovers in front of the male guests. Jack is restrained from accosting his father, but Frank suffers a fatal heart attack. Later, Jack and Kate fall in love and are married.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.