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HISTORY

According to reviews, at the end of the cast list the following statement was included: "Additional cast of 200 minor players" According to a news item, Leonce Perret supervised the editing as well as the arrangement of the musical scores and composition of the film's themes for all his films. Another news item, however, stated that Boosey and Company, music publishers, prepared the orchestration, musical score and setting to accompany this film's screenings. A song entitled "Lafayette, We Come!" was published and distributed to exhibitors as a promotional aide. The film had a New York opening on 2 Nov 1918. The film contains documentary footage of French Marshal Ferdinand Foch, General John Joseph Pershing, President Woodrow Wilson, Sir Douglas Haig, and General Armando Díaz. Some reviews and ads include a subtitle: Pershing '17 . The scenario included in the copyright descriptions was originally entitled "America First." According to news items, Perret used General Pershing's first words upon seeing Lafayette's tomb as his final title, Lafayette, We Come! ... More Less

According to reviews, at the end of the cast list the following statement was included: "Additional cast of 200 minor players" According to a news item, Leonce Perret supervised the editing as well as the arrangement of the musical scores and composition of the film's themes for all his films. Another news item, however, stated that Boosey and Company, music publishers, prepared the orchestration, musical score and setting to accompany this film's screenings. A song entitled "Lafayette, We Come!" was published and distributed to exhibitors as a promotional aide. The film had a New York opening on 2 Nov 1918. The film contains documentary footage of French Marshal Ferdinand Foch, General John Joseph Pershing, President Woodrow Wilson, Sir Douglas Haig, and General Armando Díaz. Some reviews and ads include a subtitle: Pershing '17 . The scenario included in the copyright descriptions was originally entitled "America First." According to news items, Perret used General Pershing's first words upon seeing Lafayette's tomb as his final title, Lafayette, We Come! . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
20 Jul 18
p. 531.
ETR
26 Oct 18
p. 1773.
ETR
2 Nov 18
pp. 1807-10.
MPN
2 Nov 18
p. 1821.
MPW
2 Nov 18
p. 622.
MPW
9 Nov 18
p. 693.
New York Times
4 Nov 18
p. 11.
NYDM
16 Nov 18
p. 734.
Variety
25 Oct 18
p. 35.
Wid's
15 Sep 18
p. 29.
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 November 1918
Copyright Claimant:
Leonce Perret
Copyright Date:
21 June 1918
Copyright Number:
LU12617
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Leroy Trenchard, an American pianist studying in France, falls in love with Therese Vaneuil and is heartbroken when she mysteriously disappears. At a recital hosted by Princess Sonia, who never appears in public unveiled, Leroy is moved by the resemblance of the Princess' eyes to his sweetheart's. With the outbreak of World War I, the young man enlists and, at the front, temporarily loses his sight. Upon his recovery, he learns that the nurse who has cared for him is Therese, but again she disappears. In Nice, he visits Princess Sonia's home, and as he hides behind a curtain, he sees her turn over two of her guests to secret service men. When she removes her veil, Leroy recognizes Therese and denounces her as a spy. Later, however, he learns that she was only impersonating the real Princess Sonia, a German agent executed earlier by the French, in order to assist in the capture of her confederates. Leroy begs for forgiveness and the two are ... +


Leroy Trenchard, an American pianist studying in France, falls in love with Therese Vaneuil and is heartbroken when she mysteriously disappears. At a recital hosted by Princess Sonia, who never appears in public unveiled, Leroy is moved by the resemblance of the Princess' eyes to his sweetheart's. With the outbreak of World War I, the young man enlists and, at the front, temporarily loses his sight. Upon his recovery, he learns that the nurse who has cared for him is Therese, but again she disappears. In Nice, he visits Princess Sonia's home, and as he hides behind a curtain, he sees her turn over two of her guests to secret service men. When she removes her veil, Leroy recognizes Therese and denounces her as a spy. Later, however, he learns that she was only impersonating the real Princess Sonia, a German agent executed earlier by the French, in order to assist in the capture of her confederates. Leroy begs for forgiveness and the two are united. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.