Jealous Husbands (1923)

Melodrama | 12 November 1923

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HISTORY

According to the 31 Jul 1923 FD, director Maurice Tourneur indefinitely delayed making Two Little Vagrants, based on the 1896 stage play, to begin filming Jealous Fools. Tourneur told the 18 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review that he planned an “unhappy ending” for the picture, as he preferred realism over fantasy. Production was currently underway at United Studios in Hollywood, CA. The 19 Aug 1923 FD included child actor Marion Feducha among the cast, who was credited on screen as “Don Marion.” Another child actor, four-year-old Edwin Hubbell, appeared in the film, as noted in the 22 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. The 25 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review reported the start of principal photography. The original story was attributed to Tourneur, although contemporary sources credited scenarist Fred Kennedy Myton.
       The 22 Aug and 9 Sep 1923 issues of FD reported delays in production when Tourneur contracted ptomaine poisoning in Aug 1923, and his assistant, Scott R. Beal, sustained a broken arm the following month after being struck by a “gypsy wagon” while on location in San Pedro, CA. The 24 Sep 1923 FD reported the conclusion of filming. Editing was already in progress, with titles provided by drama critic Walter Anthony. The 20 Oct 1923 Motion Picture News announced Jealous Husbands as the film’s official title, although it had already appeared a week earlier in the 13 Oct 1923 Motion Picture News. The new title was chosen following a preview screening in ... More Less

According to the 31 Jul 1923 FD, director Maurice Tourneur indefinitely delayed making Two Little Vagrants, based on the 1896 stage play, to begin filming Jealous Fools. Tourneur told the 18 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review that he planned an “unhappy ending” for the picture, as he preferred realism over fantasy. Production was currently underway at United Studios in Hollywood, CA. The 19 Aug 1923 FD included child actor Marion Feducha among the cast, who was credited on screen as “Don Marion.” Another child actor, four-year-old Edwin Hubbell, appeared in the film, as noted in the 22 Sep 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review. The 25 Aug 1923 Exhibitors Trade Review reported the start of principal photography. The original story was attributed to Tourneur, although contemporary sources credited scenarist Fred Kennedy Myton.
       The 22 Aug and 9 Sep 1923 issues of FD reported delays in production when Tourneur contracted ptomaine poisoning in Aug 1923, and his assistant, Scott R. Beal, sustained a broken arm the following month after being struck by a “gypsy wagon” while on location in San Pedro, CA. The 24 Sep 1923 FD reported the conclusion of filming. Editing was already in progress, with titles provided by drama critic Walter Anthony. The 20 Oct 1923 Motion Picture News announced Jealous Husbands as the film’s official title, although it had already appeared a week earlier in the 13 Oct 1923 Motion Picture News. The new title was chosen following a preview screening in Venice, CA. United Studios president M. C. Levee provided audience members with printed cards to express their opinions, and found that, despite an overwhelmingly positive response, many objected to the word “Fools” in the context of the story.
       The 3 Nov 1923 Motion Picture News noted that “jealousy” was a popular topic that year, as demonstrated by a series of syndicated editorials by Dr. Frank Crane. In preparation for the film, Tourneur hired a “clipping service,” which, in only one week, provided over 4,000 newspaper stories with “jealousy” in the headline.
       Jealous Husbands opened 12 Nov 1923 to positive reviews. It marked Tourneur’s third film for M. C. Levee, and his fiftieth since immigrating to the U.S. in 1914. According to the 5 Nov 1923 FD, the picture was endorsed by Captain James McDowell, head of the Los Angeles Police Department traffic division. McDowell believed that the automobile wreck depicted in the film would “prove a warning to motorists.”
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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Trade Review
1 Sep 1923
p. 599.
Exhibitors Trade Review
29 Dec 1923
p. 38.
Exhibitors Trade Review
5 Jan 1924
p. 21.
Film Daily
24 Apr 1923
p. 2.
Film Daily
5 Aug 1923
p. 8.
Film Daily
22 Aug 1923
p. 3.
Film Daily
6 Sep 1923
p. 5.
Film Daily
9 Sep 1923
p. 15.
Film Daily
23 Sep 1923
p. 5.
Film Daily
14 Dec 1923
p. 4.
Film Daily
20 Dec 1923
p. 3.
Film Daily
23 Dec 1923
p. 10.
Film Daily
3 Feb 1924.
---
Motion Picture News
11 Aug 1923
p. 677.
Motion Picture News
1 Sep 1923
p. 1081, 1104.
Motion Picture News
8 Sep 1923
p. 1237.
Motion Picture News
20 Oct 1923
p. 1929.
Motion Picture News
27 Oct 1923
p. 1981.
Motion Picture News
22 Dec 1923
p. 2900.
Motion Picture News
16 Feb 1924
p. 749.
Motion Picture News
23 Feb 1924
p. 834.
Moving Picture World
29 Dec 1923.
---
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Jealous Fools
Release Date:
12 November 1923
Production Date:
August--late September 1923
Copyright Claimant:
M. C. Levee
Copyright Date:
14 November 1923
Copyright Number:
LP19606
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
6,500
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Believing his wife, Alice, has been unfaithful, jealous husband Ramón Martínez condemns her and gives away their son, Bobbie, to some Gypsies. Alice is merely trying to protect Ramon's sister, Carmen, who is being blackmailed by a former lover, Harvey Clegg. Ramón and Alice separate; Carmen drowns in a shipwreck; but Bobbie, called Spud by the Gypsies, returns to prove his mother's innocence and thereby reunite his ... +


Believing his wife, Alice, has been unfaithful, jealous husband Ramón Martínez condemns her and gives away their son, Bobbie, to some Gypsies. Alice is merely trying to protect Ramon's sister, Carmen, who is being blackmailed by a former lover, Harvey Clegg. Ramón and Alice separate; Carmen drowns in a shipwreck; but Bobbie, called Spud by the Gypsies, returns to prove his mother's innocence and thereby reunite his family. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.