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HISTORY

According to an item in the 20 February 1915 Moving Picture World, Broadway producer William A. Brady joined Lewis J. Selznick's new distribution company, World Film Corporation, to adapt his successful plays into four- and five-reel feature films, using the original stage actors in the roles they created. In the case of The Man of the Hour, Robert Warwick reprised his "Henry Garrison" from the Broadway production. Brady's new production company, William A. Brady's Picture Plays, incorporated in Wilmington, DE, began with a capitalization of one million dollars, the 21 February 1914 Motion Picture News reported. He said he chose this moment to branch out into films because the motion picture medium had grown "beyond its experimental stage."
       The 5 Jun 1915 Motion Picture News noted that Anthony P. Kelly wrote the scenario.
       According to an item in the 28 November 1914 Moving Picture World, director Maurice Tourneur had helmed several of William A. Brady's films, including The Man of the Hour, at his own Peerless studio in Fort Lee, NJ. The films were completed during the summer, according to the 1 Aug 1914 Motion Picture News, but were not released until later, starting in September, one per month.
       The 24 October 1912 Moving Picture World ran the following review by Rev. E. Boudinot Stockton: “This picture is a photo dramatization of the famous play by George Broadhurst dealing with modern political corruption, and is the fourth of the William A. Brady features to be released by the World Film Corporation. That it will meet with the success of its original on the ...

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According to an item in the 20 February 1915 Moving Picture World, Broadway producer William A. Brady joined Lewis J. Selznick's new distribution company, World Film Corporation, to adapt his successful plays into four- and five-reel feature films, using the original stage actors in the roles they created. In the case of The Man of the Hour, Robert Warwick reprised his "Henry Garrison" from the Broadway production. Brady's new production company, William A. Brady's Picture Plays, incorporated in Wilmington, DE, began with a capitalization of one million dollars, the 21 February 1914 Motion Picture News reported. He said he chose this moment to branch out into films because the motion picture medium had grown "beyond its experimental stage."
       The 5 Jun 1915 Motion Picture News noted that Anthony P. Kelly wrote the scenario.
       According to an item in the 28 November 1914 Moving Picture World, director Maurice Tourneur had helmed several of William A. Brady's films, including The Man of the Hour, at his own Peerless studio in Fort Lee, NJ. The films were completed during the summer, according to the 1 Aug 1914 Motion Picture News, but were not released until later, starting in September, one per month.
       The 24 October 1912 Moving Picture World ran the following review by Rev. E. Boudinot Stockton: “This picture is a photo dramatization of the famous play by George Broadhurst dealing with modern political corruption, and is the fourth of the William A. Brady features to be released by the World Film Corporation. That it will meet with the success of its original on the legitimate stage there can hardly be any doubt. Not only is the picture story equally forcible and true to life as the stage version, but the picture allows of many little bits of characterization and detail, necessarily omitted before the footlights, that greatly enhance the human heart interest of the story and bring before us most vividly the reality of the characters as human beings. The actors from Robert Warwick, who created the part and plays the central character in both play and photodrama, down to the sneak thief, butlers, aldermen and other supers, have made the most of their opportunity in a very intelligent and gratifying way and, except on rare occasions, make us forget that they are actors and actresses. Especially good are Ned Burton as the corrupt political boss, Eric Mayne as the unscrupulous financier and false friend, Alec B. Francis as the trusting and ruined father of the 'man of the hour,' and Belle Adair as the heroine. Mention should also be made of the two western characters: Chester Barrett as the hero's 'pal' and Thomas Jackson as the sheriff. The exteriors are very well chosen and some of them are extremely beautiful. The interiors are also noteworthy for their fidelity to the atmosphere and tone of the story and especially remarkable are the convention hall where the man of the hour makes his campaign speech and the council room of the board of aldermen where the fight on the franchise bill is played. Political plays as a rule have on the screen a farcical element due to the fact that the settings in which they are played are manifestly unreal. The undoubted genuineness of the settings in The Man of the Hour eliminate this element and force home to the spectator in a most telling way the reality of what is being enacted.”

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
21 Feb 1914
p. 32
Motion Picture News
1 Aug 1914
p. 72
Motion Picture News
10 Oct 1914
p. 48
Motion Picture News
30 Jan 1915
p. 30
Motion Picture News
5 Jun 1915
p. 41
Motography
10 Oct 1914
p. 515
Motography
17 Oct 1914
p. 546
Moving Picture World
17 Jun 1914
p. 32
Moving Picture World
10 Oct 1914
p. 150-151
Moving Picture World
24 Oct 1914
p. 496
Moving Picture World
28 Nov 1914
p. 1242
Moving Picture World
20 Feb 1915
p. 1153
Moving Picture World
11 Sep 1915
p. 1838
NYDM
7 Oct 1914
p. 30
Variety
10 Oct 1914
p. 24
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 October 1914
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
World Film Corp.
14 October 1914
LU3525
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in feet):
5,000
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

George Garrison kills himself after he is ruined by speculating in the stock market on phony tips given to him by financier Charles Wainwright, but before his death he begs his son Henry to avenge him. Henry, known as an idler, wants to marry Wainwright's daughter, Dallas, but she insists that he first accomplishes something worthwhile. In the tradition of these wayward young Easterners, Henry goes out West to make his fortune prospecting for gold, and succeeds. When he returns to New York City, however, he assumes the name of Henry Thompson. He becomes Wainwright's political protégé and is elected as a figurehead mayor, backed by Wainwright's crony, political boss Richard Horrigan. In return for Wainwright's support, Henry is supposed to sign a franchise agreement binding the city to the financier's railway. When Henry refuses, Wainwright and his flunkies attempt to discredit him by dredging up an old murder charge, but the charge is proved false when the supposed victim, Henry's mining partner Joe Standing, shows up very much alive. Finally, Henry confronts Wainwright and accuses him of causing his father's death, along with attempting to defraud the city. Despite Henry's denunciation of her father, Dallas proclaims him worthy of her love. In an epilogue, the hands of the victims of political boss Horrigan clutch at him from the ...

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George Garrison kills himself after he is ruined by speculating in the stock market on phony tips given to him by financier Charles Wainwright, but before his death he begs his son Henry to avenge him. Henry, known as an idler, wants to marry Wainwright's daughter, Dallas, but she insists that he first accomplishes something worthwhile. In the tradition of these wayward young Easterners, Henry goes out West to make his fortune prospecting for gold, and succeeds. When he returns to New York City, however, he assumes the name of Henry Thompson. He becomes Wainwright's political protégé and is elected as a figurehead mayor, backed by Wainwright's crony, political boss Richard Horrigan. In return for Wainwright's support, Henry is supposed to sign a franchise agreement binding the city to the financier's railway. When Henry refuses, Wainwright and his flunkies attempt to discredit him by dredging up an old murder charge, but the charge is proved false when the supposed victim, Henry's mining partner Joe Standing, shows up very much alive. Finally, Henry confronts Wainwright and accuses him of causing his father's death, along with attempting to defraud the city. Despite Henry's denunciation of her father, Dallas proclaims him worthy of her love. In an epilogue, the hands of the victims of political boss Horrigan clutch at him from the grave.

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Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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