Full page view
HISTORY

This was John Mason's first film. At the time of the filming, both Marguerite Leslie and Frederick Perry were playing leading roles in Broadway plays. Early in Jun 1915, an exhibition of stereoscopic pictures given by Edwin S. Porter and William E. Waddell at the Astor Theater in New York included scenes from this film. The camera used contained two lenses separated by the distance between a normal pair of eyes. The two films produced were tinted red and green. Spectators at the exhibition wore two-color glasses to view the film. Porter and Waddell spent several years developing the process. In 1921, a film from the same source was made by William Bennett Productions and released by Associated First National Pictures, starring Lionel Barrymore. (See AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; ... More Less

This was John Mason's first film. At the time of the filming, both Marguerite Leslie and Frederick Perry were playing leading roles in Broadway plays. Early in Jun 1915, an exhibition of stereoscopic pictures given by Edwin S. Porter and William E. Waddell at the Astor Theater in New York included scenes from this film. The camera used contained two lenses separated by the distance between a normal pair of eyes. The two films produced were tinted red and green. Spectators at the exhibition wore two-color glasses to view the film. Porter and Waddell spent several years developing the process. In 1921, a film from the same source was made by William Bennett Productions and released by Associated First National Pictures, starring Lionel Barrymore. (See AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ; F2.2805.) More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motog
26 Jun 15
p. 1077.
MPN
30 Jan 15
p. 36.
MPN
19 Jun 15
p. 73.
MPW
21 Aug 15
p. 1322.
NYDM
16 Jun 15
p. 21, 28
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Jim the Penman by Sir Charles L. Young (New York, 1 Nov 1886).
DETAILS
Release Date:
3 June 1915
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Nina L'Estrange chooses to marry Louis Percival over his rival and friend, bank cashier James Ralston. After Percival goes to Chicago to take care of his inheritance, Ralston forges a letter to Nina from Percival breaking the engagement. She marries Ralston and they move to London, where Ralston begins a forging operation with Baron Hartfeld and amasses a fortune, though no one suspects that he is the notorious "Jim the Penman." After Ralston and Hartfeld successfully steal the famous Drelincourt necklace, Ralston learns that his daughter is engaged to Lord Drelincourt. He tries to return the necklace, but Hartfeld refuses to give it up. Captain Redwood, an English aristocrat and amateur detective, overhears their disagreement. He recovers the necklace and obtains $75,000 "hush money" from Ralston, which he gives to Percival, whom Jim the Penman earlier robbed. Although Nina learns about Ralston's forgeries, she overlooks them for the sake of their daughter who is about to marry. On the eve of the wedding, Ralston, now remorseful, dies of heart failure while arguing with Hartfeld. Redwood then apprehends ... +


Nina L'Estrange chooses to marry Louis Percival over his rival and friend, bank cashier James Ralston. After Percival goes to Chicago to take care of his inheritance, Ralston forges a letter to Nina from Percival breaking the engagement. She marries Ralston and they move to London, where Ralston begins a forging operation with Baron Hartfeld and amasses a fortune, though no one suspects that he is the notorious "Jim the Penman." After Ralston and Hartfeld successfully steal the famous Drelincourt necklace, Ralston learns that his daughter is engaged to Lord Drelincourt. He tries to return the necklace, but Hartfeld refuses to give it up. Captain Redwood, an English aristocrat and amateur detective, overhears their disagreement. He recovers the necklace and obtains $75,000 "hush money" from Ralston, which he gives to Percival, whom Jim the Penman earlier robbed. Although Nina learns about Ralston's forgeries, she overlooks them for the sake of their daughter who is about to marry. On the eve of the wedding, Ralston, now remorseful, dies of heart failure while arguing with Hartfeld. Redwood then apprehends Hartfeld. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.