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HISTORY

The play was based on the book Arsène Lupin by Maurice Leblanc, first published in Paris in 1907. Paul Potter wrote an American version of the play which may have been related more directly to the book than the French play. Var on 10 Mar 1917, p. 29, gives a description of the legal case concerning Potter's claim to copyright of the original play. The film opened in New York on 4 Feb 1917. It was originally to be released nationally on 26 Feb 1917, but was held back until 12 Mar 1917. Among the many other films based on the play, Leblanc's books, or the Arsène Lupin character are: the 1916 British film Arsène Lupin , directed by George Loane Tucker; the 1919 Famous Players-Lasky film The Teeth of the Tiger (see entry); the 1920 Robertson-Cole film 813 (see entry); the 1921 Hungarian film Arsène Lupin Utolso Kalandja , directed by Paul Fejos; the 1923 Japanese film 813 , directed by Kenji Mizoguchi; the 1932 M-G-M production Arsène Lupin , starring John and Lionel Barrymore and directed by Jack Conway; the 1938 M-G-M film Arsène Lupin Returns , starring Melvyn Douglas and directed by George Fitzmaurice; and the 1957 French film Les Aventures d'Arsène Lupin , directed by Jacques Becker. ...

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The play was based on the book Arsène Lupin by Maurice Leblanc, first published in Paris in 1907. Paul Potter wrote an American version of the play which may have been related more directly to the book than the French play. Var on 10 Mar 1917, p. 29, gives a description of the legal case concerning Potter's claim to copyright of the original play. The film opened in New York on 4 Feb 1917. It was originally to be released nationally on 26 Feb 1917, but was held back until 12 Mar 1917. Among the many other films based on the play, Leblanc's books, or the Arsène Lupin character are: the 1916 British film Arsène Lupin , directed by George Loane Tucker; the 1919 Famous Players-Lasky film The Teeth of the Tiger (see entry); the 1920 Robertson-Cole film 813 (see entry); the 1921 Hungarian film Arsène Lupin Utolso Kalandja , directed by Paul Fejos; the 1923 Japanese film 813 , directed by Kenji Mizoguchi; the 1932 M-G-M production Arsène Lupin , starring John and Lionel Barrymore and directed by Jack Conway; the 1938 M-G-M film Arsène Lupin Returns , starring Melvyn Douglas and directed by George Fitzmaurice; and the 1957 French film Les Aventures d'Arsène Lupin , directed by Jacques Becker.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
ETR
24 Feb 1917
p. 836
Motog
3 Mar 1917
p.483
MPN
10 Mar 1917
p. 1566
MPW
12 Feb 1916
p. 850
NYDM
3 Feb 1917
p. 32
NYDM
17 Feb 1917
p. 31
NYDM
24 Feb 1917
p. 26
Wid's
22 Feb 1917
p. 125
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Arsène Lupin by Francis de Croisset (pseud. of Francis Wiener), Maurice Leblanc (Paris, 28 Oct 1908).
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 March 1917
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
The Vitagraph Co. of America
20 February 1917
LP10242
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Arsene Lupin, a gentleman thief, matches wits with the Paris police. Posing as the Duke of Charmerace, Lupin assumes title to the duke's estates and then sets about stealing rare works of art and jewels belonging to Monsieur Guernay-Martin. As the first step in his plan, he becomes engaged to Germaine, Guernay-Martin's daughter. When his art works begin to disappear, Guernay-Martin asks Guerchard, the shrewdest detective in Paris, to investigate the robberies. As Guerchard closes in on Lupin, the crook falls in love with Sonia Kritchoff, Germaine's secretary. Aided by his loyal assistant Victoire, Lupin escapes with Sonia, whom he discovers is a fellow crook. Guerchard trails them to Lupin's apartment where the couple evade the detective by locking him in a concealed elevator and then driving off in his automobile. Relieved, Sonia and Lupin decide to marry and retire from criminal ...

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Arsene Lupin, a gentleman thief, matches wits with the Paris police. Posing as the Duke of Charmerace, Lupin assumes title to the duke's estates and then sets about stealing rare works of art and jewels belonging to Monsieur Guernay-Martin. As the first step in his plan, he becomes engaged to Germaine, Guernay-Martin's daughter. When his art works begin to disappear, Guernay-Martin asks Guerchard, the shrewdest detective in Paris, to investigate the robberies. As Guerchard closes in on Lupin, the crook falls in love with Sonia Kritchoff, Germaine's secretary. Aided by his loyal assistant Victoire, Lupin escapes with Sonia, whom he discovers is a fellow crook. Guerchard trails them to Lupin's apartment where the couple evade the detective by locking him in a concealed elevator and then driving off in his automobile. Relieved, Sonia and Lupin decide to marry and retire from criminal life.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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