The Studio Girl (1918)

Comedy | 1918

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HISTORY

The start of principal photography was announced in the 1 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News. Provisionally titled The Cliffs, the scenario was based on the 1911 French play, La gamine (The Runaway) by Pierre Veber and Henri de Gorsse. The company had spent a week on location in and around Marblehead, MA, and Ausable Chasm near Keeseville, NY. The 15 Dec 1917 Exhibitors Herald included Russell Dassett among the cast.
       The 8 Dec 1917 Motography noted that lead actress Constance Talmadge was required to perform several scenes in the rain. While unseasonably mild weather interfered with the film’s progress, Talmadge was reportedly urging director Charles Giblyn to finish production before the winter set in. One week later, the 15 Dec 1917 Motography revealed that delays continued, although the company was able to shoot one scene near Englewood, NJ, on a rainy day. However, their automobile was impounded because its license plates appeared to have expired two years earlier. Giblyn spent the rest of the afternoon explaining to police that the outdated plates were necessary for the picture, which had been officially re-titled, The Studio Girl. On 22 Dec 1917, Motion Picture News reported that Talmadge endured freezing weather while dressed in summer attire in an effort to complete filming. One week later, the 29 Dec 1917 Moving Picture World stated that editing and titling were in process, and Talmadge was returning to her home in Los Angeles, CA.
       The Studio Girl opened in late Jan or early Feb 1918 to ...

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The start of principal photography was announced in the 1 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News. Provisionally titled The Cliffs, the scenario was based on the 1911 French play, La gamine (The Runaway) by Pierre Veber and Henri de Gorsse. The company had spent a week on location in and around Marblehead, MA, and Ausable Chasm near Keeseville, NY. The 15 Dec 1917 Exhibitors Herald included Russell Dassett among the cast.
       The 8 Dec 1917 Motography noted that lead actress Constance Talmadge was required to perform several scenes in the rain. While unseasonably mild weather interfered with the film’s progress, Talmadge was reportedly urging director Charles Giblyn to finish production before the winter set in. One week later, the 15 Dec 1917 Motography revealed that delays continued, although the company was able to shoot one scene near Englewood, NJ, on a rainy day. However, their automobile was impounded because its license plates appeared to have expired two years earlier. Giblyn spent the rest of the afternoon explaining to police that the outdated plates were necessary for the picture, which had been officially re-titled, The Studio Girl. On 22 Dec 1917, Motion Picture News reported that Talmadge endured freezing weather while dressed in summer attire in an effort to complete filming. One week later, the 29 Dec 1917 Moving Picture World stated that editing and titling were in process, and Talmadge was returning to her home in Los Angeles, CA.
       The Studio Girl opened in late Jan or early Feb 1918 to generally enthusiastic reviews. A dissenting opinion appeared in the Jul 1918 Film Fun, claiming that Talmadge “struggled through the stupid story as best she could” under Giblyn’s poor direction.
       According to the 23 Feb 1918 Exhibitors Herald, the Chicago, IL, Board of Censors removed only two subtitles, one of which made reference to the Mann Act, a law that prevented the transportation of minors across state lines for immoral purposes.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
Personal note credit:
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald
15 Dec 1917
p. 20
Exhibitors Herald
9 Feb 1918
p. 25
Exhibitors Herald
23 Feb 1918
p. 29
Exhibitors Trade Review
2 Feb 1918
p. 764
Exhibitors Trade Review
9 Feb 1918
p. 793
Film Fun
Jul 1918
---
Motion Picture News
1 Dec 1917
p. 3868
Motion Picture News
22 Dec 1917
p. 4352.
Motion Picture News
9 Feb 1918
p. 886
Motion Picture News
17 Aug 1918
p. 1021
Motography
8 Dec 1917
p. 1196
Motography
15 Dec 1917
p. 1247
Motography
9 Feb 1918
p. 281
Moving Picture World
29 Dec 1917
p. 1975
Moving Picture World
19 Jan 1918
p. 417
Moving Picture World
9 Feb 1918
p. 866
NYDM
2 Feb 1918
p. 22
Variety
1 Feb 1918
p. 47
Wid's Daily
31 Jan 1918
pp. 912-913
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
WRITER
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play La gamine (The Runaway) by Pierre Veber, Henri de Gorsse (1911).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Cliffs
Release Date:
1918
Premiere Information:
Jan or early Feb 1918
Production Date:
Nov-Dec 1917
Copyright Info
Claimant
DATE
CopyrightNumber
Select Pictures Corp.
17 January 1918
LP11982
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Weary of the straitlaced surroundings of her New England coastal village, Celia Laird is thrilled when dashing New York City artist Frazer Ordway vacations in Cliff Haven for his health. Celia's frequent meetings with Frazer prompt her two maiden aunts, Harriet and Rachel Farnum, to arrange a marriage with Obediah Daw, a wealthy though foppish man whom the aunts consider an ideal match for their niece. Realizing that the pretty and high-spirited girl is distracting him from thoughts of his fiancée, Adriana Peroni, Frazer decides to return to New York City. Halfway there, he finds Celia hiding in the back seat of his car and promptly puts her on a train for home. However, Celia is determined to escape a union with Obediah and secretly boards a train to the city instead. Frazer later enters his home to find Celia in his easy chair. When Adriana learns of Celia's presence, she ends the engagement, ultimately finding happiness with Dr. Walter Grierson. Celia's aunts arrive with police to arrest Frazer for kidnapping, then discover that the happy couple is about to depart on their ...

More Less

Weary of the straitlaced surroundings of her New England coastal village, Celia Laird is thrilled when dashing New York City artist Frazer Ordway vacations in Cliff Haven for his health. Celia's frequent meetings with Frazer prompt her two maiden aunts, Harriet and Rachel Farnum, to arrange a marriage with Obediah Daw, a wealthy though foppish man whom the aunts consider an ideal match for their niece. Realizing that the pretty and high-spirited girl is distracting him from thoughts of his fiancée, Adriana Peroni, Frazer decides to return to New York City. Halfway there, he finds Celia hiding in the back seat of his car and promptly puts her on a train for home. However, Celia is determined to escape a union with Obediah and secretly boards a train to the city instead. Frazer later enters his home to find Celia in his easy chair. When Adriana learns of Celia's presence, she ends the engagement, ultimately finding happiness with Dr. Walter Grierson. Celia's aunts arrive with police to arrest Frazer for kidnapping, then discover that the happy couple is about to depart on their honeymoon.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.