Blind Man's Eyes (1919)

Drama | 10 March 1919

Full page view
HISTORY

Principal photography began 6 Jan 1919 at Metro Pictures Corp. Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to the 4 Jan 1919 Motion Picture News and the 11 Jan 1919 Moving Picture World. As of 25 Jan 1919, production was half completed, according to that day’s Motion Picture News. Sets for the film included a replica Pullman “sleeper” railroad car, constructed on the studio lot. One week later, the 1 Feb 1919 Moving Picture World reported that Metro had chartered an actual train, including sleeper and observation cars, for exterior and interior scenes. The train travelled approximately 110 miles to and from Los Angeles, CA. An item in the 22 Feb 1919 Moving Picture World revealed that production ended at least two weeks earlier.
       The picture debuted 10 Mar 1919, followed by a 6 Apr 1919 opening at the Hippodrome in Los Angeles. Reviews were generally positive, with the 29 Mar 1919 Exhibitors Herald and Motography noting scenarist June Mathis’s faithful adaptation of the 1916 source novel, The Blind Man’s Eyes by William Briggs MacHarg.
       The scenario was adapted as a short story by W. Emory Cheesman for the Apr 1919 Photo-Play Journal.
...

More Less

Principal photography began 6 Jan 1919 at Metro Pictures Corp. Studios in Hollywood, CA, according to the 4 Jan 1919 Motion Picture News and the 11 Jan 1919 Moving Picture World. As of 25 Jan 1919, production was half completed, according to that day’s Motion Picture News. Sets for the film included a replica Pullman “sleeper” railroad car, constructed on the studio lot. One week later, the 1 Feb 1919 Moving Picture World reported that Metro had chartered an actual train, including sleeper and observation cars, for exterior and interior scenes. The train travelled approximately 110 miles to and from Los Angeles, CA. An item in the 22 Feb 1919 Moving Picture World revealed that production ended at least two weeks earlier.
       The picture debuted 10 Mar 1919, followed by a 6 Apr 1919 opening at the Hippodrome in Los Angeles. Reviews were generally positive, with the 29 Mar 1919 Exhibitors Herald and Motography noting scenarist June Mathis’s faithful adaptation of the 1916 source novel, The Blind Man’s Eyes by William Briggs MacHarg.
       The scenario was adapted as a short story by W. Emory Cheesman for the Apr 1919 Photo-Play Journal.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Bio
29 Apr 1920
p. 54
Camera
6 Apr 1919
p. 10, 14
Exhibitors Herald and Motography
29 Mar 1919
p. 33
Exhibitors Trade Review
22 Mar 1919
p. 1207
Motion Picture News
4 Jan 1919
p. 122
Motion Picture News
18 Jan 1919
p. 408
Motion Picture News
25 Jan 1919
p. 585
Motion Picture News
15 Feb 1919
p. 1025
Motion Picture News
22 Feb 1919
p. 8
Motion Picture News
1 Jun 1919
p. 13
Moving Picture World
22 Mar 1919
p. 1854
Moving Picture World
11 Jan 1919
p. 196
Moving Picture World
1 Feb 1919
p. 661
Moving Picture World
22 Feb 1919
p. 1018
Moving Picture World
1 Mar 1919
p. 1227
Moving Picture World
15 Mar 1919
p. 1536
Moving Picture World
22 Mar 1919
p. 1698
Photo-Play Journal
Apr 1919
p. 19.
DETAILS
Release Date:
10 March 1919
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 6 Apr 1919
Production Date:
6 Jan--early Feb 1919
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Metro Pictures Corp.
19 March 1919
LP13514
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

In a Pullman sleeper car, Hugh Overton, alias Philip D. Eaton, is returning to Chicago, Illinois, after escaping from a penitentiary, hoping to clear himself of the murder of Matthew Latrone, a crooked financier who cheated Hugh's mother out of her estate. However, Latrone is still alive and has sent Donald Avery, the secretary to blind lawyer Basil Santoine, to kill Hugh. Avery enters the wrong berth and knocks his employer unconscious. Santoine suspects Hugh and invites him to his home to investigate further. He accepts since he knows that Santoine is to receive a confession clearing him of the murder. Hugh falls in love with Santoine's daughter Harriet, known as "the blind man's eyes," but cannot tell her until he clears his name. Latrone, aided by Avery, enters the house to steal the confession, but Hugh stops him and during their struggle, Latrone is shot. Hugh, now proven innocent, declares his love for Harriet, and she ...

More Less

In a Pullman sleeper car, Hugh Overton, alias Philip D. Eaton, is returning to Chicago, Illinois, after escaping from a penitentiary, hoping to clear himself of the murder of Matthew Latrone, a crooked financier who cheated Hugh's mother out of her estate. However, Latrone is still alive and has sent Donald Avery, the secretary to blind lawyer Basil Santoine, to kill Hugh. Avery enters the wrong berth and knocks his employer unconscious. Santoine suspects Hugh and invites him to his home to investigate further. He accepts since he knows that Santoine is to receive a confession clearing him of the murder. Hugh falls in love with Santoine's daughter Harriet, known as "the blind man's eyes," but cannot tell her until he clears his name. Latrone, aided by Avery, enters the house to steal the confession, but Hugh stops him and during their struggle, Latrone is shot. Hugh, now proven innocent, declares his love for Harriet, and she reciprocates.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.