Paradise--Hawaiian Style (1966)

91 mins | Drama | 15 June 1966

Director:

Michael Moore

Producer:

Hal B. Wallis

Cinematographer:

Wallace Kelley

Editor:

Warren Low

Production Designers:

Hal Pereira, Walter Tyler

Production Company:

Hal Wallis Productions
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HISTORY

The 14 Jul 1965 DV announced singer Elvis Presley’s next film as Hawaiian Paradise, to be filmed on location in Honolulu, Oahu, HI. On 23 Jul 1965 DV reported that principal photography would begin 27 Jul 1965, with members of the cast and crew arriving on location over the next ten days. According to the 27 Jul 1965 DV, Presley began recording ten songs for the film the previous day, accompanied by The Jordanaires, a vocal group comprised of Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews, Ray Sanders, and Hoyt Hawkins.
       As reported in the 3 Aug 1965 DV, production manager Robert Goodstein won a concession from the Hawaiian Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, allowing the company to count only the hours child actors appeared on set, while discounting those spent waiting for a “camera call.” The same concession was given to the producers of Hawaii (1966, see entry), which was filming elsewhere on the island. Both productions reportedly encountered difficulty hiring child actors due to state labor laws that restricted working hours for juveniles.
       The 9 Aug 1965 LAT claimed that veteran character actor Grady Sutton was disappointed over having to remain in Los Angeles, CA, while a stand-in played his scenes on location. Sutton completed his role later that month at Paramount Studios. Later that week, the 13 Aug 1965 DV reported that composer Joseph J. Lilley arrived on Oahu to supervise two production numbers featuring Presley and “200 native dancers.”
       As stated in the 18 Aug 1965 LAT, several scenes ... More Less

The 14 Jul 1965 DV announced singer Elvis Presley’s next film as Hawaiian Paradise, to be filmed on location in Honolulu, Oahu, HI. On 23 Jul 1965 DV reported that principal photography would begin 27 Jul 1965, with members of the cast and crew arriving on location over the next ten days. According to the 27 Jul 1965 DV, Presley began recording ten songs for the film the previous day, accompanied by The Jordanaires, a vocal group comprised of Gordon Stoker, Neal Matthews, Ray Sanders, and Hoyt Hawkins.
       As reported in the 3 Aug 1965 DV, production manager Robert Goodstein won a concession from the Hawaiian Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, allowing the company to count only the hours child actors appeared on set, while discounting those spent waiting for a “camera call.” The same concession was given to the producers of Hawaii (1966, see entry), which was filming elsewhere on the island. Both productions reportedly encountered difficulty hiring child actors due to state labor laws that restricted working hours for juveniles.
       The 9 Aug 1965 LAT claimed that veteran character actor Grady Sutton was disappointed over having to remain in Los Angeles, CA, while a stand-in played his scenes on location. Sutton completed his role later that month at Paramount Studios. Later that week, the 13 Aug 1965 DV reported that composer Joseph J. Lilley arrived on Oahu to supervise two production numbers featuring Presley and “200 native dancers.”
       As stated in the 18 Aug 1965 LAT, several scenes were also filmed at the Polynesian Cultural Center in Laie, HI, on the northwest side of the island. According to the 26 Aug 1965 LAT, production in Laie lasted two weeks, during which Presley was ensconced in a guarded hotel suite. After location shooting was completed, Presley’s manager, Col. Tom Parker, allowed 500 fans to file through the suite for the singer’s autograph. A private event was held later that day, during which Presley was given a personal farewell by 150 young women representing the Maori, Tonga, Fiji, Samoan, Tahitian, and Hawaiian cultures. All had reportedly appeared in scenes filmed at the Polynesian Cultural Center. The 24 Aug 1965 DV announced the 22 Aug 1965 completion of location filming. Production later resumed in Los Angeles.
       On 8 Sep 1965, DV announced Paradise, Hawaiian Style as the new title. Associate producer Paul Nathan was returning to the set following a week in the hospital for treatment of a “muscle spasm.” The 22 Sep 1965 DV stated that actress Julie Parrish was also hospitalized, although her condition was not disclosed. Seven days later, production ended with a party sponsored by producer Hal Wallis, as reported in the 30 Sep 1965 DV.
       On 29 Nov 1965, DV noted that Joseph J. Lilley would begin recording the film’s score with his forty-five-piece orchestra.
       Paradise—Hawaiian Style opened 15 Jun 1966 in New York City. Critical response was lukewarm, with the 16 Jun 1966 NYT comparing it to formulaic 1930s program films starring Bing Crosby. Regardless, Seventeen magazine declared it “Picture of the Month,” and the 6 Jul 1966 DV projected earnings of $120,000 for its opening week at twenty-nine Los Angeles theaters. By the end of 1966, the film made $2.5 million in rentals, with projected earning of $3.2 million, as noted in the 4 Jan 1967 Var.
       Casting announcements during the course of production included Playboy magazine model China Lee (1 Sep 1965 DV), Anne Morell (27 Aug 1965 DV), and Lisa Seagram (7 Sep 1965 DV). A news item in the 8 Sep 1965 LAT noted that the picture marked the singing debut of actress Marianna Hill.
       “Film Assignments” in the 30 Jul 1965 DV listed the following crewmembers: Nat Holt and Robert Templeton , assistant directors; Lennie South , camera operator; Gene Liggett and Dewey Wrigley, assistants; Richard Cook, recorder; Bud Parman, boom; Bob McCrillis, props; Herb Welts, and Douglas Cook, grips; Loren Netten , gaffer; Bud Kirkpatrick, best boy; Grace Harris and John Anderson: wardrobe; Gary Morris, makeup; Sherri Wilson, hairdresser; Marvin Weldon, script supervisor.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Jul 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
15 Jul 1965
p. 5.
Daily Variety
23 Jul 1965
p. 9.
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1965
p. 5.
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1965
p. 11.
Daily Variety
30 Jul 1965
p. 16.
Daily Variety
3 Aug 1965
p. 5.
Daily Variety
6 Aug 1965
p. 9.
Daily Variety
13 Aug 1965
p. 6.
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1965
p. 10.
Daily Variety
27 Aug 1965
p. 3.
Daily Variety
1 Sep 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
7 Sep 1965
p. 5.
Daily Variety
8 Sep 1965
p. 10.
Daily Variety
22 Sep 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
30 Sep 1965
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Nov 1965
p. 15.
Daily Variety
4 May 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
6 Jun 1966
p. 3.
Daily Variety
6 Jul 1966
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
9 Aug 1965
Section C, p. 18.
Los Angeles Times
18 Aug 1965
Section D, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
26 Aug 1965
Section D, p. 13.
Los Angeles Times
8 Sep 1965
Section C, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
1 Jul 1966
Section D, p. 8.
New York Times
15 Jun 1966
p. 43.
New York Times
16 Jun 1966
p. 53.
Variety
4 Jan 1967
p. 8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Helicopter photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
MUSIC
Background mus comp & cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
DANCE
Choreog
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Asst to the prod
SOURCES
SONGS
"Paradise Hawaiian Style," "Scratch My Back (Then I'll Scratch Yours)," "Stop Where You Are" and "This Is My Heaven," words and music by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum and Florence Kaye
"House of Sand" and "Queenie Wahine's Papaya," words and music by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum, Florence Kaye and Donna Butterworth
"Datin'," words and music by Fred Wise and Randy Starr
+
SONGS
"Paradise Hawaiian Style," "Scratch My Back (Then I'll Scratch Yours)," "Stop Where You Are" and "This Is My Heaven," words and music by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum and Florence Kaye
"House of Sand" and "Queenie Wahine's Papaya," words and music by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum, Florence Kaye and Donna Butterworth
"Datin'," words and music by Fred Wise and Randy Starr
"A Dog's Life," words and music by Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman
"Sand Castles," words and music by Herb Goldberg, David Hess and Sonna Butterworth
"Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home?" words and music by Hughie Cannon.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Hawaiian Paradise
Release Date:
15 June 1966
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 15 June 1966
Production Date:
27 July--29 September 1965
Copyright Claimant:
Hal Wallis Productions
Copyright Date:
31 December 1965
Copyright Number:
LP32470
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
91
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Airline pilot Rick Richards, unemployed because of his playboy ways, returns to Hawaii. There, with his old friend Danny Kohana, he establishes a charter helicopter service to fly tourists around the islands. Judy Hudson, hired as a secretary, intrigues Rick with her aloofness, although he continues to see other girl friends who work in the hotels. When dogs in his helicopter cause Rick accidentally to buzz the car of a Federal aviation agent and force him into a ditch, Rick is grounded until a hearing can determine if his license should be revoked. He violates the order, however, to rescue Danny, whose leg is broken when his helicopter crashes in a remote section of the islands. At a big party, Rick's girl friends learn of his deals with other girls and gang up on him. He escapes, successfully pleads his case with the aviation agent, and wins Judy's ... +


Airline pilot Rick Richards, unemployed because of his playboy ways, returns to Hawaii. There, with his old friend Danny Kohana, he establishes a charter helicopter service to fly tourists around the islands. Judy Hudson, hired as a secretary, intrigues Rick with her aloofness, although he continues to see other girl friends who work in the hotels. When dogs in his helicopter cause Rick accidentally to buzz the car of a Federal aviation agent and force him into a ditch, Rick is grounded until a hearing can determine if his license should be revoked. He violates the order, however, to rescue Danny, whose leg is broken when his helicopter crashes in a remote section of the islands. At a big party, Rick's girl friends learn of his deals with other girls and gang up on him. He escapes, successfully pleads his case with the aviation agent, and wins Judy's affection. +

GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Aviation, with songs


Subject

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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