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HISTORY

According to the 24 Aug 1918 Motion Picture News, the provisionally titled Part White was the only film in production that week at Robert Brunton Studios in Hollywood, CA, the future site of Paramount Studios. The title was a reference to the protagonist, a “quarter-breed Indian maiden” played by Louise Glaum. The Dec 1918 Picture-Play identified the production company by its former ownership, Peralta Studios.
       The 31 Aug 1918 Motion Picture News referred to the project by its official title, The Goddess of Lost Lake, and reported that location filming was planned for the Northern California town of Pinecrest. Two weeks later, however, the 14 Sep 1918 issue revealed that the company had been on location in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California. As noted in the 19 Oct 1918 Moving Picture World, the location team was comprised of “twenty-six people and eight horses.” Mountain scenes were filmed at altitudes of 5,500 to 7,000 feet above sea level, and a horse-drawn buckboard was used in areas that could not accommodate automobiles. The pinto pony ridden on screen by Louise Glaum was identified as “Paint” in the 19 Oct 1918 Exhibitors Herald and Motography. The Mar 1919 Photoplay included actor Monte Blue among the cast, appearing as a Native American.
       An article in the 5 Oct 1918 Motion Picture News claimed that the film’s release was postponed due to “difficulties attending the production,” and another Brunton picture, The Heart of Rachael, was scheduled to open in its place. However, ...

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According to the 24 Aug 1918 Motion Picture News, the provisionally titled Part White was the only film in production that week at Robert Brunton Studios in Hollywood, CA, the future site of Paramount Studios. The title was a reference to the protagonist, a “quarter-breed Indian maiden” played by Louise Glaum. The Dec 1918 Picture-Play identified the production company by its former ownership, Peralta Studios.
       The 31 Aug 1918 Motion Picture News referred to the project by its official title, The Goddess of Lost Lake, and reported that location filming was planned for the Northern California town of Pinecrest. Two weeks later, however, the 14 Sep 1918 issue revealed that the company had been on location in the San Bernardino Mountains of Southern California. As noted in the 19 Oct 1918 Moving Picture World, the location team was comprised of “twenty-six people and eight horses.” Mountain scenes were filmed at altitudes of 5,500 to 7,000 feet above sea level, and a horse-drawn buckboard was used in areas that could not accommodate automobiles. The pinto pony ridden on screen by Louise Glaum was identified as “Paint” in the 19 Oct 1918 Exhibitors Herald and Motography. The Mar 1919 Photoplay included actor Monte Blue among the cast, appearing as a Native American.
       An article in the 5 Oct 1918 Motion Picture News claimed that the film’s release was postponed due to “difficulties attending the production,” and another Brunton picture, The Heart of Rachael, was scheduled to open in its place. However, contemporary sources stated that both pictures were released on 14 Oct 1918.
       The Goddess of Lost Lake opened to generally positive reviews, with several critics commending Glaum, known as a dramatic actress, for undertaking a comedic role.
       According to an advertisement in the 30 Nov 1918 Motion Picture News, distributor W. W. Hodkinson Corp. had arranged a re-release through the Pathé Exchange, inc., scheduled for 2 Dec 1918. An item in the 27 Mar 1919 Wid’s Daily stated that marketing company Federal Photoplays, Inc., had sold the picture’s foreign distribution rights to Inter Ocean Films.
       The 19 Oct 1918 Moving Picture World included a music and sound effects cue sheet to accompany the film.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Exhibitors Herald and Motography
19 Oct 1918
p. 27, 42
Exhibitors Trade Review
31 Aug 1918
p. 3
Motion Picture News
24 Aug 1918
p. 1266
Motion Picture News
31 Aug 1918
p. 3
Motion Picture News
14 Sep 1918
p. 9
Motion Picture News
5 Oct 1918
p. 2211
Motion Picture News
12 Oct 1918
p. 2414
Motion Picture News
19 Oct 1918
p. 2598
Motion Picture News
30 Dec 1918
p. 3169
Motion Picture News
5 Jun 1920
p. 4682
Moving Picture World
28 Sep 1918
p. 1899
Moving Picture World
12 Oct 1918p
p. 259
Moving Picture World
19 Oct 1918
p. 360, 382
Moving Picture World
26 Oct 1918
p. 542
Moving Picture World
2 Nov 1918
p. 626
NYDM
28 Dec 1918
p. 998
Photoplay
Mar 1919
p. 35
Picture-Play
Dec 1918
p. 296
Variety
18 Oct 1918
p. 38
Wid's Daily
27 Mar 1919
---
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Part White
Release Date:
14 October 1918
Production Date:
began Aug 1918
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Mary Thorne, a quarter-breed Native American, returns home from the East with a college degree and an air of refinement, although she relishes the freedom of her father Marshall's mountain cabin. When Mark Hamilton and Chester Martin visit the cabin on a hunting expedition, Mary, in a spirit of mischief, dons her Indian clothing and convinces them that she is full-blooded. Mark falls deeply in love with the girl, while Chester, contemptuous of her Indian background, though attracted to her, decides to possess her. While her father is hunting for gold at Lost Lake, Chester enters Mary's room and attacks her. Mark rescues her, after which he realizes, by the modern decor of her room, that Mary is a cultured young lady. Later, Marshall is killed by an Indian guard at Lost Lake, but Mary inherits the gold he discovered and marries ...

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Mary Thorne, a quarter-breed Native American, returns home from the East with a college degree and an air of refinement, although she relishes the freedom of her father Marshall's mountain cabin. When Mark Hamilton and Chester Martin visit the cabin on a hunting expedition, Mary, in a spirit of mischief, dons her Indian clothing and convinces them that she is full-blooded. Mark falls deeply in love with the girl, while Chester, contemptuous of her Indian background, though attracted to her, decides to possess her. While her father is hunting for gold at Lost Lake, Chester enters Mary's room and attacks her. Mark rescues her, after which he realizes, by the modern decor of her room, that Mary is a cultured young lady. Later, Marshall is killed by an Indian guard at Lost Lake, but Mary inherits the gold he discovered and marries Mark.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.