Her American Husband (1918)

Drama | 27 January 1918

Full page view
HISTORY

The 1 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News announced that filming was in progress under the provisional title, Mr. Butterfly. The scenario was inspired by the 1898 short story, Madame Butterfly, by John Luther Long.
       As stated in the 8 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News, location filming was expected to begin the following week in San Diego, CA, at the site of a Japanese garden. Meanwhile, at Ince-Triangle Studios in Culver City, CA, the costume department was reportedly “overworked” in its rush to create a wardrobe for the production. The 15 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News noted that sets were under construction to avoid interruptions in the schedule when the company returned. Among the more elaborate sets was an “Oriental palace” built inside a glass stage, according to the 29 Dec 1917 Moving Picture World. The article also stated that the garden in San Diego was undergoing renovations, requiring the company to move to a similar location in Sierra Madre, CA.
       Although the cast featured several Japanese-American actors, the role of “Cherry Blossom” went to Caucasian actress Teddy Sampson, based on her portrayal of a Japanese maiden in The Fox Woman (1915, see entry).
       The 5 Jan 1918 Moving Picture World announced that principal photography had been completed and editing was underway. As reported in the 12 Jan 1918 issues of Motion Picture News and Moving Picture World, the end of production was celebrated with a traditional Japanese dinner party hosted by cast members Thomas Kurihara, Jack ... More Less

The 1 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News announced that filming was in progress under the provisional title, Mr. Butterfly. The scenario was inspired by the 1898 short story, Madame Butterfly, by John Luther Long.
       As stated in the 8 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News, location filming was expected to begin the following week in San Diego, CA, at the site of a Japanese garden. Meanwhile, at Ince-Triangle Studios in Culver City, CA, the costume department was reportedly “overworked” in its rush to create a wardrobe for the production. The 15 Dec 1917 Motion Picture News noted that sets were under construction to avoid interruptions in the schedule when the company returned. Among the more elaborate sets was an “Oriental palace” built inside a glass stage, according to the 29 Dec 1917 Moving Picture World. The article also stated that the garden in San Diego was undergoing renovations, requiring the company to move to a similar location in Sierra Madre, CA.
       Although the cast featured several Japanese-American actors, the role of “Cherry Blossom” went to Caucasian actress Teddy Sampson, based on her portrayal of a Japanese maiden in The Fox Woman (1915, see entry).
       The 5 Jan 1918 Moving Picture World announced that principal photography had been completed and editing was underway. As reported in the 12 Jan 1918 issues of Motion Picture News and Moving Picture World, the end of production was celebrated with a traditional Japanese dinner party hosted by cast members Thomas Kurihara, Jack Abbe, and Misao Seki, all members of the Japanese Photoplay Association of Los Angeles. The event, held at an unidentified café, was attended by members of the cast and crew, along with actors Yukio Aoyama, Goro Kino, and Henry Ketani, among others.
       Despite glowing reviews in the 25 Jan 1918 Var and Apr 1918 Photoplay, box-office reports in the 23 Mar 1918 Motion Picture News revealed that audience attendance was only average. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture News
1 Dec 1917
p. 3822, 3855
Motion Picture News
8 Dec 1917
p. 4, 3999
Motion Picture News
15 Dec 1917
p. 4198
Motion Picture News
22 Dec 1917
p. 4396
Motion Picture News
29 Dec 1917
p. 8
Motion Picture News
12 Jan 1918
p. 287, 288
Motion Picture News
23 Mar 1918
p. 1717
Moving Picture World
8 Dec 1917
p. 1474
Moving Picture World
29 Dec 1917
p. 1976
Moving Picture World
5 Jan 1918
p. 64
Moving Picture World
8 Jan 1918
p. 221
Moving Picture World
2 Feb 1918
p. 684, 722
NYDM
26 Jan 1918
pp. 19-20
Photoplay
Apr 1918
p. 73
Variety
25 Jan 1918
p. 45
Wid's Daily
24 Jan 1918
p. 898
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
COSTUMES
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story, Madame Butterfly by John Luther Long, first published in Century Magazine (New York, 1898).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Mr. Butterfly
Release Date:
27 January 1918
Production Date:
December 1917
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Herbert Franklyn, the son of a wealthy dealer of imported goods, refuses to curb his appetite for gaiety and women, forcing his fiancée, Miriam Faversham, to end their engagement. During the firm's annual trip to Japan, Herbert meets Cherry Blossom, whose father, Tokimasa, wishes her to marry a westerner. Despite her love for Kato Nakamura, Cherry Blossom obeys her father and departs for New Rochelle, NY, with her new husband. Soon after their arrival, Herbert resumes his old habits, neglecting his lonely bride. Kato has a vision of Cherry Blossom's unhappiness and arrives in the U.S. with Tokimasa, who strangles Herbert and later commits ... +


Herbert Franklyn, the son of a wealthy dealer of imported goods, refuses to curb his appetite for gaiety and women, forcing his fiancée, Miriam Faversham, to end their engagement. During the firm's annual trip to Japan, Herbert meets Cherry Blossom, whose father, Tokimasa, wishes her to marry a westerner. Despite her love for Kato Nakamura, Cherry Blossom obeys her father and departs for New Rochelle, NY, with her new husband. Soon after their arrival, Herbert resumes his old habits, neglecting his lonely bride. Kato has a vision of Cherry Blossom's unhappiness and arrives in the U.S. with Tokimasa, who strangles Herbert and later commits suicide. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.