Full page view
HISTORY

An item in the Jun 1917 Photoplay noted that filming took place on Long Island, New York. Months later, director John B. O’Brien told the Feb 1918 Motion Picture that he had been receiving complaints since the film’s release about the staged death of “Gwendolyn,” the title character’s pet goat. O’Brien insisted that the goat was not harmed, but merely sedated with chloroform. However, Gwendolyn proved resistant to the drug and required eight ounces of chloroform and the director and seven crew members to control her before she was rendered unconscious. Also in the cast was Cesare Gravina, as stated in the 21 Oct 1916 Motion Picture Studio Directory and Trade Annual.
       The 5 Aug 1916 editions of Motography and Moving Picture World revealed that distributor Paramount Pictures Corp. allowed exhibitors in some major cities to book the film prior to its scheduled 31 Jul 1916 release date. A Chicago, IL, debut occurred the previous week during an exhibitors’ convention while star Mary Pickford was in town. Reviews were generally positive, with critics heralding Pickford’s return to the screen after an absence of several months. The 2 Sep 1916 Motion Picture News noted that the film set a new box-office record for Woodley’s Theatre in Los Angeles, despite the sweltering summer weather. Some credit was given to theater manager R. W. Woodley, who filled the lobby with Dutch-themed paintings and transformed the ticket booth into “the lower portion of a windmill.” Similar record-breaking engagements were reported from other parts of the U.S., including Boston, MA.
       The ... More Less

An item in the Jun 1917 Photoplay noted that filming took place on Long Island, New York. Months later, director John B. O’Brien told the Feb 1918 Motion Picture that he had been receiving complaints since the film’s release about the staged death of “Gwendolyn,” the title character’s pet goat. O’Brien insisted that the goat was not harmed, but merely sedated with chloroform. However, Gwendolyn proved resistant to the drug and required eight ounces of chloroform and the director and seven crew members to control her before she was rendered unconscious. Also in the cast was Cesare Gravina, as stated in the 21 Oct 1916 Motion Picture Studio Directory and Trade Annual.
       The 5 Aug 1916 editions of Motography and Moving Picture World revealed that distributor Paramount Pictures Corp. allowed exhibitors in some major cities to book the film prior to its scheduled 31 Jul 1916 release date. A Chicago, IL, debut occurred the previous week during an exhibitors’ convention while star Mary Pickford was in town. Reviews were generally positive, with critics heralding Pickford’s return to the screen after an absence of several months. The 2 Sep 1916 Motion Picture News noted that the film set a new box-office record for Woodley’s Theatre in Los Angeles, despite the sweltering summer weather. Some credit was given to theater manager R. W. Woodley, who filled the lobby with Dutch-themed paintings and transformed the ticket booth into “the lower portion of a windmill.” Similar record-breaking engagements were reported from other parts of the U.S., including Boston, MA.
       The 2 Sep 1916 Motography announced that Pickford had left Famous Players-Lasky to form the Mary Pickford Film Corporation. She completed Hulda from Holland as her final release for the studio, although her contract had expired in Mar 1916.
       The film was re-issued by Famous Players-Lasky Corp. in their Success Series on 26 Apr 1919. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Motion Picture
Feb 1918
p. 166
Motion Picture News
3 Jul 1915
p. 32
Motion Picture News
1 Jan 1916
p. 106
Motion Picture News
12 Aug 1916
p. 946
Motion Picture News
2 Sep 1916
p. 1364, 1405
Motion Picture Studio Directory and Trade Annual
21 Oct 1916
p. 49
Motography
5 Aug 1916
p. 333
Motography
12 Aug 1916
p. 397
Motography
2 Sep 1916
p. 525
Motography
23 Sep 1916
p. 709
Moving Picture World
3 Jul 1915
p. 75
Moving Picture World
5 Aug 1916
p. 923
Moving Picture World
12 Aug 1916
p. 1102
New York Times
31 Jul 1916
p. 6
NYDM
5 Aug 1916
p. 22
Photoplay
Jun 1917
p. 156
Variety
4 Aug 1916
p. 29
Wid's Daily
20 Jul 1916
p. 726
DETAILS
Release Date:
31 July 1916
Copyright Claimant:
Famous Players Film Co.
Copyright Date:
14 July 1916
Copyright Number:
LU8683
Physical Properties:
Silent
Black and White
Length(in reels):
5
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

When Uncle Peter goes to pick up his niece Hulda, newly arrived in the United States from Holland, he is hit by a car and must be hospitalized. As a result, Hulda takes a room in a boardinghouse, where she falls in love with Allan, the artist son of John Walton, a railroad magnate who has been badgering Peter to sell him his land. Peter eventually recovers and Hulda goes to live with him, but Allan follows her and, at his father's request, keeps on suggesting that Peter sell his land to the railroad. Peter finally relents, after which Hulda and Allan get married. John attends the ceremony, and after the couple is married, there is a reconciliation between him and ... +


When Uncle Peter goes to pick up his niece Hulda, newly arrived in the United States from Holland, he is hit by a car and must be hospitalized. As a result, Hulda takes a room in a boardinghouse, where she falls in love with Allan, the artist son of John Walton, a railroad magnate who has been badgering Peter to sell him his land. Peter eventually recovers and Hulda goes to live with him, but Allan follows her and, at his father's request, keeps on suggesting that Peter sell his land to the railroad. Peter finally relents, after which Hulda and Allan get married. John attends the ceremony, and after the couple is married, there is a reconciliation between him and Peter. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.