5 Card Stud (1968)

103 mins | Western | 12 July 1968

Director:

Henry Hathaway

Producer:

Hal B. Wallis

Cinematographer:

Daniel L. Fapp

Editor:

Warren Low

Production Designer:

Walter Tyler
Full page view
HISTORY

Producer Hal B. Wallis acquired screen rights to Ray Gaulden’s 1967 novel, Glory Gulch, in spring 1967, as noted in the 17 May 1967 Var. Shortly after, the 8 Jun 1967 DV confirmed that Henry Hathaway would direct. The project marked a re-teaming of Wallis and Hathaway after The Sons of Katie Elder (1965, see entry). Filming was initially scheduled to begin on 1 Oct 1967 at Paramount Pictures studios in Hollywood, CA, and on location. An item in the 28 Aug 1967 DV later reported that Hathaway was scouting locations in Durango, Mexico. The start of production was delayed until early Feb 1968, the 22 Dec 1967 DV reported.
       The 29 Aug 1967 LAT announced that Dean Martin and Robert Mitchum would co-star. On the same day, a DV news brief stated that Burt Reynolds had met with Wallis to discuss playing the role of a “heavy,” but had turned it down. Items in the 19 Feb 1968, 20 Feb 1968, and 16 Mar 1968 LAT listed Hope Summers, Trinidad Villa, and Robert Houser as cast members.
       According to a 13 Mar 1968 LAT news item, Hathaway wrote an original hymn, titled “Come, Sinners,” to be used in a church meeting scene, but he did not plan to credit himself, or the song, onscreen.
       Principal photography began on 7 Feb 1968 in Durango, Mexico. As noted in the 27 Mar 1968 DV, twenty-two actors and fifty-two crewmembers were flown in from Hollywood. After seven weeks of filming in Durango, the 22 Mar 1968 DV ... More Less

Producer Hal B. Wallis acquired screen rights to Ray Gaulden’s 1967 novel, Glory Gulch, in spring 1967, as noted in the 17 May 1967 Var. Shortly after, the 8 Jun 1967 DV confirmed that Henry Hathaway would direct. The project marked a re-teaming of Wallis and Hathaway after The Sons of Katie Elder (1965, see entry). Filming was initially scheduled to begin on 1 Oct 1967 at Paramount Pictures studios in Hollywood, CA, and on location. An item in the 28 Aug 1967 DV later reported that Hathaway was scouting locations in Durango, Mexico. The start of production was delayed until early Feb 1968, the 22 Dec 1967 DV reported.
       The 29 Aug 1967 LAT announced that Dean Martin and Robert Mitchum would co-star. On the same day, a DV news brief stated that Burt Reynolds had met with Wallis to discuss playing the role of a “heavy,” but had turned it down. Items in the 19 Feb 1968, 20 Feb 1968, and 16 Mar 1968 LAT listed Hope Summers, Trinidad Villa, and Robert Houser as cast members.
       According to a 13 Mar 1968 LAT news item, Hathaway wrote an original hymn, titled “Come, Sinners,” to be used in a church meeting scene, but he did not plan to credit himself, or the song, onscreen.
       Principal photography began on 7 Feb 1968 in Durango, Mexico. As noted in the 27 Mar 1968 DV, twenty-two actors and fifty-two crewmembers were flown in from Hollywood. After seven weeks of filming in Durango, the 22 Mar 1968 DV stated that cast and crew moved to Churubusco Studios in Mexico City, where interiors would be shot. Filming was scheduled to be completed on 15 Apr 1968, as reported in the 16 Feb 1968 DV. The 10 Apr 1968 DV confirmed that Robert Mitchum and Dean Martin had finished work on the picture, and the 24 Apr 1968 Var announced that principal photography had ended.
       5 Card Stud opened on 12 Jul 1968 at the Oriental Theatre in Chicago, IL. Openings followed on 31 Jul 1968 in New York City, and on 14 Aug 1968 in Los Angeles, CA. Despite lukewarm reviews, the 5 Feb 1969 Var cited a cumulative domestic box-office gross of $3.5 million, to date. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Chicago Tribune
7 Jul 1968
p. 114.
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1967
p. 1.
Daily Variety
28 Aug 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
29 Aug 1967
p. 2.
Daily Variety
22 Dec 1967
p. 1.
Daily Variety
31 Jan 1968
p. 8.
Daily Variety
7 Feb 1968
p. 4.
Daily Variety
16 Feb 1968
p. 2.
Daily Variety
22 Mar 1968
p. 38.
Daily Variety
27 Mar 1968
p. 8.
Daily Variety
10 Apr 1968
p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
10 Jun 1967
Section B, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
29 Aug 1967
Section D, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
19 Feb 1968
Section C, p. 29.
Los Angeles Times
20 Feb 1968
Section C, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
13 Mar 1968
Section D, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
16 Mar 1968
Section B, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
9 Aug 1968
Section E, p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
14 Aug 1968
Section G, p. 11.
New York Times
1 Aug 1968.
---
The Odessa American
27 Apr 1968
p. 19.
Variety
17 May 1967
p. 14.
Variety
14 Jun 1967
p. 21.
Variety
13 Mar 1968
p. 19.
Variety
24 Apr 1968
p. 22.
Variety
17 Jul 1968
p. 6.
Variety
5 Feb 1969
p. 35.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Hal Wallis Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp & cond
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Glory Gulch by Ray Gaulden (New York, 1967).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"5 Card Stud," words and music by Maurice Jarre and Ned Washington
"Mercy's Call," words and music W. H. Doane and F. C. Van Alstyne.
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 July 1968
Premiere Information:
Chicago opening: 12 July 1968
New York opening: 31 July 1968
Los Angeles opening: 14 August 1968
Production Date:
7 February--mid April 1968
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures
Copyright Date:
12 July 1968
Copyright Number:
LP36394
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
103
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1880, a stud poker game in Rincon, Colorado, ends violently when one of the players, a stranger, is lynched for attempting to cheat. Gambler Van Morgan, who alone tried to prevent the hanging, decides to move on to Denver. After he leaves, a gold rush hits Rincon, bringing with it the self-ordained Reverend Jonathan Rudd, a fire-and-brimstone preacher, and Lily Langford, a madam with a group of lady barbers. After learning that two of the poker players have been murdered, Van returns to Rincon, despite the warning of bartender Little George that someone may be planning to kill every man who played in the game. While Van divides his time between tracking down the killer and diverting himself with both Lily and Nora Evers, two more of the game's participants are murdered. Unknown to Van, the killer is Rev. Rudd, whose brother was the lynch victim; he was supplied with the names of the other players by Nora's brother, Nick, who claims he tried to circumvent the hanging, although he actually instigated it. After killing Little George on Evers's advice, Rudd discovers that Nick was the ringleader of the lynching and that Van was also in the card game. He outdraws Nick and then goes after his final victim, but the preacher is killed in the final shootout. Van leaves once more for Denver, bidding farewell to both Nora and ... +


In 1880, a stud poker game in Rincon, Colorado, ends violently when one of the players, a stranger, is lynched for attempting to cheat. Gambler Van Morgan, who alone tried to prevent the hanging, decides to move on to Denver. After he leaves, a gold rush hits Rincon, bringing with it the self-ordained Reverend Jonathan Rudd, a fire-and-brimstone preacher, and Lily Langford, a madam with a group of lady barbers. After learning that two of the poker players have been murdered, Van returns to Rincon, despite the warning of bartender Little George that someone may be planning to kill every man who played in the game. While Van divides his time between tracking down the killer and diverting himself with both Lily and Nora Evers, two more of the game's participants are murdered. Unknown to Van, the killer is Rev. Rudd, whose brother was the lynch victim; he was supplied with the names of the other players by Nora's brother, Nick, who claims he tried to circumvent the hanging, although he actually instigated it. After killing Little George on Evers's advice, Rudd discovers that Nick was the ringleader of the lynching and that Van was also in the card game. He outdraws Nick and then goes after his final victim, but the preacher is killed in the final shootout. Van leaves once more for Denver, bidding farewell to both Nora and Lily. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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