The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962)

90 mins | Comedy | 18 April 1962

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Writer:

George Wells

Producer:

Joe Pasternak

Cinematographer:

Robert Bronner

Editor:

Richard Farrell

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Merrill Pye

Production Company:

Euterpe, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The 4 Apr 1961 DV noted that the film version of Gordon Cotler’s 1959 novel, The Bottletop Affair, was to be titled The Horizontal Lieutenant. It was the fourth picture in which Jim Hutton was teamed with Paula Prentiss, and the first to feature comedian Jack Carter. Principal photography began 5 Sep 1961, as noted in 8 Sep 1961 DV production charts. The 11 Sep 1961 DV identified the shooting location as MGM Studios in Culver City, CA. A news item in the 10 Oct 1961 DV stated that Sudanese president El Ferik Ibrahim Abboud visited the set the previous day, guarded by twenty uniformed police. Jack Carter completed his role and returned to New York City soon after, as reported in the 12 Oct 1961 DV.
       The 8 Nov 1961 DV listed the picture among several that were completed or nearing completion for release by MGM. Editing was underway by the following month, as noted in the 6 Dec 1961 DV.
       The film was released 2 May 1962 in Los Angeles, CA, and 11 May 1962 in New York City. Critical response was unenthusiastic, although the 3 May 1962 LAT review mentioned an “unequivocally funny” scene involving a Pacific islander and five translators. In the 9 May 1962 LAT , a reader named Mrs. Donald Maxwell informed the critic that an identical routine appeared years earlier in the French release, The Pearls of the Crown (1937). Box office receipts were tepid, as evidenced by the 8 ... More Less

The 4 Apr 1961 DV noted that the film version of Gordon Cotler’s 1959 novel, The Bottletop Affair, was to be titled The Horizontal Lieutenant. It was the fourth picture in which Jim Hutton was teamed with Paula Prentiss, and the first to feature comedian Jack Carter. Principal photography began 5 Sep 1961, as noted in 8 Sep 1961 DV production charts. The 11 Sep 1961 DV identified the shooting location as MGM Studios in Culver City, CA. A news item in the 10 Oct 1961 DV stated that Sudanese president El Ferik Ibrahim Abboud visited the set the previous day, guarded by twenty uniformed police. Jack Carter completed his role and returned to New York City soon after, as reported in the 12 Oct 1961 DV.
       The 8 Nov 1961 DV listed the picture among several that were completed or nearing completion for release by MGM. Editing was underway by the following month, as noted in the 6 Dec 1961 DV.
       The film was released 2 May 1962 in Los Angeles, CA, and 11 May 1962 in New York City. Critical response was unenthusiastic, although the 3 May 1962 LAT review mentioned an “unequivocally funny” scene involving a Pacific islander and five translators. In the 9 May 1962 LAT , a reader named Mrs. Donald Maxwell informed the critic that an identical routine appeared years earlier in the French release, The Pearls of the Crown (1937). Box office receipts were tepid, as evidenced by the 8 Jun 1962 DV, which described the film as “only marking time in its fourth week” in New York City.
       An advertisement in the 8 May 1962 DV credited Al Sendrey as collaborating with composer George Stoll. The 5 Oct 1961 DV announced the casting of Leslie Matsunaga, Cheri Nagai, and Cherylene Lee.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Apr 1961
p. 8.
Daily Variety
27 Jul 1961
p. 3.
Daily Variety
29 Aug 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
8 Sep 1961
p. 6.
Daily Variety
11 Sep 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
19 Sep 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
5 Oct 1961
p. 16.
Daily Variety
9 Oct 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
10 Oct 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
12 Oct 1961
p. 2.
Daily Variety
8 Nov 1961
p. 4.
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1961
p. 1.
Daily Variety
25 Apr 1962
p. 3.
Daily Variety
8 May 1962
p. 3, 6.
Daily Variety
8 Jun 1962
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
25 Apr 1962
Section A, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
3 May 1962
Section F, p. 1; Section C, p. 9.
Los Angeles Times
9 May 1962
Section D, p. 17.
New York Times
7 May 1962
p. 38.
New York Times
12 May 1962
p. 15.
Variety
14 Mar 1962
p. 4.
Variety
4 Apr 1962
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec supv
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
Spec visual eff
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to the prod
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Bottletop Affair by Gordon Cotler (New York, 1959).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"The Horizontal Lieutenant," music and lyrics by George Stoll and Stella Unger, sung by The Diamonds
"How About You?," music and lyrics by Burton Lane and Ralph Freed.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Bottletop Affair
Release Date:
18 April 1962
Premiere Information:
San Francisco opening: 18 April 1962
Los Angeles opening: 2 May 1962
New York opening: 11 May 1962
Production Date:
began 5 September 1961
Copyright Claimant:
Euterpe, Inc.
Copyright Date:
31 December 1961
Copyright Number:
LP21546
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
90
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Stationed in Hawaii in World War II, Merle Wye, a 2d lieutenant in Army Intelligence, becomes enamored of Molly Blue, a former schoolmate, now an Army nurse. But because of his ineptitude on the intraservice baseball team, Merle is transferred to the remote American-held island of Rotohan. His "mission" is to capture one Kobayashi, a harmless but annoying Japanese who has been stealing "vital" Army supplies (gefilte fish, soda pop, etc.). After the miserable failure of several of his schemes, Merle disguises his Oriental aide, timid Sgt. Roy Tada, as a Japanese captive and orders him to learn the identity of Kobayashi from the islanders. At this time Molly arrives at the base hospital, but she still refuses to respond to Merle's advances. One evening the islanders put on a show for the Americans, and Tada's new girl friend, Akiko, points out an acrobat as Kobayashi. Merle, however, again bungles everything, and the thief escapes. As a result, Merle is ordered transferred to an even more remote outpost. On the eve of his departure, he and Molly accidentally discover the hiding place of Kobayashi. There is a scuffle in which Merle is knocked unconscious, but Molly subdues the elusive Kobayashi. Merle receives the credit for the capture and wins both a citation and ... +


Stationed in Hawaii in World War II, Merle Wye, a 2d lieutenant in Army Intelligence, becomes enamored of Molly Blue, a former schoolmate, now an Army nurse. But because of his ineptitude on the intraservice baseball team, Merle is transferred to the remote American-held island of Rotohan. His "mission" is to capture one Kobayashi, a harmless but annoying Japanese who has been stealing "vital" Army supplies (gefilte fish, soda pop, etc.). After the miserable failure of several of his schemes, Merle disguises his Oriental aide, timid Sgt. Roy Tada, as a Japanese captive and orders him to learn the identity of Kobayashi from the islanders. At this time Molly arrives at the base hospital, but she still refuses to respond to Merle's advances. One evening the islanders put on a show for the Americans, and Tada's new girl friend, Akiko, points out an acrobat as Kobayashi. Merle, however, again bungles everything, and the thief escapes. As a result, Merle is ordered transferred to an even more remote outpost. On the eve of his departure, he and Molly accidentally discover the hiding place of Kobayashi. There is a scuffle in which Merle is knocked unconscious, but Molly subdues the elusive Kobayashi. Merle receives the credit for the capture and wins both a citation and Molly. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.