Uncertain Glory (1944)

100 or 102 mins | Drama | 22 April 1944

Director:

Raoul Walsh

Producer:

Robert Buckner

Cinematographer:

Sid Hickox

Editor:

George Amy

Production Designer:

Robert Haas

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Apr 1944.
---
Daily Variety
5 Apr 44
p. 3.
Film Daily
24 Apr 44
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Aug 43
p. 23.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Oct 43
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Apr 44
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 44
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
8 Apr 44
p. 1833.
New York Times
8 Apr 44
p. 9.
Variety
5 Apr 44
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Thomson Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
Scr
Orig story
Orig story
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Orch arr
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Unit mgr
Unit pub
DETAILS
Release Date:
22 April 1944
Premiere Information:
New York opening: week of 7 April 1944
Production Date:
late August--mid October 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
29 April 1944
Copyright Number:
LP12619
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
100 or 102
Length(in feet):
9,186
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a French prison in 1943, habitual criminal Jean Picard is to be executed. On the way to the guillotine, however, the prison is bombed and Picard escapes. He demands a passport and money from a fellow criminal, Henri Duval. Louise, Duval's girl friend, follows Picard when he leaves, and a jealous Duval then betrays Picard to his nemesis, police detective Marcel Bonet, who recaptures Picard near the Spanish border. On the train returning to Paris, their journey is interrupted because a bridge has been blown up by the French underground. In response, the Germans arrest 100 hostages, whom they intend to kill if the saboteur does not surrender to them. Seeing a possible avenue of escape, Picard suggests that as he must die anyway, he could claim to be the saboteur and thus die for a good cause. At first Bonet is skeptical of Picard's motives and rejects the idea, but later changes his mind and tells his superiors that Picard was killed trying to escape. Picard and Bonet then survey the ruined bridge, and that night, Bonet coaches Picard so that he can convince the Germans of the truth of his claim. Meanwhile, shopkeeper Mme. Maret, whose son is a hostage, suggests that one of the villagers pretend to be the saboteur and sacrifice himself for the release of the prisoners. The villagers reject her plan, but later, when Picard and Bonet come into her shop, she decides to accuse them of sabotage. She encourages her shopgirl, Marianne, to go out with the flirtatious Picard, hoping the girl will keep him in the village until she can ... +


In a French prison in 1943, habitual criminal Jean Picard is to be executed. On the way to the guillotine, however, the prison is bombed and Picard escapes. He demands a passport and money from a fellow criminal, Henri Duval. Louise, Duval's girl friend, follows Picard when he leaves, and a jealous Duval then betrays Picard to his nemesis, police detective Marcel Bonet, who recaptures Picard near the Spanish border. On the train returning to Paris, their journey is interrupted because a bridge has been blown up by the French underground. In response, the Germans arrest 100 hostages, whom they intend to kill if the saboteur does not surrender to them. Seeing a possible avenue of escape, Picard suggests that as he must die anyway, he could claim to be the saboteur and thus die for a good cause. At first Bonet is skeptical of Picard's motives and rejects the idea, but later changes his mind and tells his superiors that Picard was killed trying to escape. Picard and Bonet then survey the ruined bridge, and that night, Bonet coaches Picard so that he can convince the Germans of the truth of his claim. Meanwhile, shopkeeper Mme. Maret, whose son is a hostage, suggests that one of the villagers pretend to be the saboteur and sacrifice himself for the release of the prisoners. The villagers reject her plan, but later, when Picard and Bonet come into her shop, she decides to accuse them of sabotage. She encourages her shopgirl, Marianne, to go out with the flirtatious Picard, hoping the girl will keep him in the village until she can put her plan into action. Later that afternoon, when Picard and Bonet return to their room, the police are waiting for them. They have arrested a man they believe to be the saboteur, but they are also suspicious of these strangers. Bonet shows them his police identification and pretends that both Picard and the other man, who is the real saboteur, also belong to the Sureté, or secret police. Before they help the real saboteur to escape, Bonet questions him closely, without explaining that Picard will then use the information to bolster his own confession. As the time nears to take Picard to Paris, Bonet becomes ill and is confined to his bed. Picard takes advantage of his illness to escape, accompanied by Marianne, who warns him of the villagers' plot. The couple hides out with a farm family whose son is one of the hostages. Picard, who has genuinely fallen in love with Marianne, leaves her at the farm while he returns to Paris in order to acquire enough money to leave the country. In Paris, however, Picard goes to Bonet and asks the policeman to accompany him to Gestapo headquarters. His love for Marianne has convinced Picard to redeem his life of crime by sacrificing himself for the hostages. At Picard's request, Bonet delivers the news to Marianne. Sadly she asks Bonet what Picard was really like in his heart and Bonet responds, "He was a Frenchman." +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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