What Next, Corporal Hargrove? (1945)

95-96 mins | Comedy | November 1945

Director:

Richard Thorpe

Writer:

Harry Kurnitz

Producer:

George Haight

Cinematographer:

Henry Sharp

Editor:

Albert Akst

Production Designers:

Cedric Gibbons, Leonid Vasian

Production Company:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
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HISTORY

This film was a sequel to the 1943 M-G-M film See Here, Private Hargrove (see above), which also starred Robert Walker in the title role and Keenan Wynn as "Private Thomas Mulvehill." A Jul 1945 HR news item noted that M-G-M paid $100,000 to Sgt. Marion Hargrove for the use of his name in this film. An Aug 1945 HR news item listed Army veterans John Saunders and Alfred Reisman in the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Some filming took place at Camp Pendleton, CA. For his work on the film, Harry Kurnitz received an Academy Award nomination in the Writing (Original Story) ... More Less

This film was a sequel to the 1943 M-G-M film See Here, Private Hargrove (see above), which also starred Robert Walker in the title role and Keenan Wynn as "Private Thomas Mulvehill." A Jul 1945 HR news item noted that M-G-M paid $100,000 to Sgt. Marion Hargrove for the use of his name in this film. An Aug 1945 HR news item listed Army veterans John Saunders and Alfred Reisman in the cast, but their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. Some filming took place at Camp Pendleton, CA. For his work on the film, Harry Kurnitz received an Academy Award nomination in the Writing (Original Story) category. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
17 Nov 1945.
---
Daily Variety
16 Nov 45
p. 3.
Film Daily
21 Nov 45
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jul 45
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 45
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 45
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Aug 45
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Sep 45
p. 16.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 45
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jan 46
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
10 Nov 45
p. 2710.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
17 Nov 45
p. 2717.
New York Times
26 Dec 45
p. 15.
Variety
21 Nov 45
p. 10.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
James Davis
Charles Latorre
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
Story and scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus score
SOUND
Rec dir
Unit mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Re-rec and eff mixer
Mus mixer
Mus mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Matte paintings, cam
Asst to A. Arnold Gillespie
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Research dir
Asst research dir
STAND INS
Double for Keenan Wynn
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Marion Hargrove.
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1945
Production Date:
19 July--early September 1945
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 November 1945
Copyright Number:
LP10
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
95-96
Length(in feet):
8,522
Country:
United States
PCA No:
11206
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

A short time after the D-Day invasion, as the Allied forces move across the Normandy peninsula toward Paris, an American unit, the B Battery of 352nd Field Artillery, becomes separated from the caravan when its artillery truck gets stuck in the mud. Unable to catch up with the caravan, Corporal Marion Hargrove, the commander of the gun crew, leads his battery to the small French town of Mardenne, which has just been liberated from the Germans. When the townspeople see Hargrove and his men approaching, they mistake them for their liberators and hail them as heroes in a huge celebration. The mayor of Mardenne, Ouidoc, extends a warm welcome to Hargrove and proudly introduces him to his attractive young daughter Jeanne. Jeanne later takes Hargrove on a private tour of the town, but Hargrove, who wishes to remain faithful to his girl friend back home, carefully resists any romantic entanglement with Jeanne. Meanwhile, another member of Hargrove's unit, Private Thomas Mulvehill, stirs up trouble by exploiting the town's hospitality and subjecting some of the residents to his confidence schemes. When the day comes for Hargrove and his men to leave Mardenne, the town sends them off with a huge farewell ceremony. Despite Hargrove's success in fostering good will between the French citizens and the Allied forces, he is later demoted for his actions and sent to work digging a garbage pit as punishment. Hargrove's fortunes soon change, however, when the Army encounters difficulties securing the trust and cooperation of the people of Mardenne, and sends his unit back to help set up a military government. Hargrove is again given a warm welcome ... +


A short time after the D-Day invasion, as the Allied forces move across the Normandy peninsula toward Paris, an American unit, the B Battery of 352nd Field Artillery, becomes separated from the caravan when its artillery truck gets stuck in the mud. Unable to catch up with the caravan, Corporal Marion Hargrove, the commander of the gun crew, leads his battery to the small French town of Mardenne, which has just been liberated from the Germans. When the townspeople see Hargrove and his men approaching, they mistake them for their liberators and hail them as heroes in a huge celebration. The mayor of Mardenne, Ouidoc, extends a warm welcome to Hargrove and proudly introduces him to his attractive young daughter Jeanne. Jeanne later takes Hargrove on a private tour of the town, but Hargrove, who wishes to remain faithful to his girl friend back home, carefully resists any romantic entanglement with Jeanne. Meanwhile, another member of Hargrove's unit, Private Thomas Mulvehill, stirs up trouble by exploiting the town's hospitality and subjecting some of the residents to his confidence schemes. When the day comes for Hargrove and his men to leave Mardenne, the town sends them off with a huge farewell ceremony. Despite Hargrove's success in fostering good will between the French citizens and the Allied forces, he is later demoted for his actions and sent to work digging a garbage pit as punishment. Hargrove's fortunes soon change, however, when the Army encounters difficulties securing the trust and cooperation of the people of Mardenne, and sends his unit back to help set up a military government. Hargrove is again given a warm welcome by the townspeople, especially by Jeanne, who greets him with a big kiss. When Jeanne resumes her romantic pursuit of Hargrove, Hargrove expresses his concerns to his superiors and asks permission to tell Jeanne about his girl friend. The request is denied, however, because the Army fears that Hargrove's admission will undermine the delicate relationship between military police and the town officials. Mulvehill, meanwhile, continues to press his confidence games on the townspeople with little success. Mulvehill himself falls victim to a confidence scheme when watchmaker Marcel Vivin sells him a fake map detailing the exact location of valuable watches that are supposedly buried in a Paris cellar. When Mulvehill realizes that his unit is being forced to remain in Mardenne because of Jeanne's infatuation with Hargrove, he secretly arranges to have her leave town to join the French WACS. With their services no longer required in Mardenne, Hargrove and his division are sent to rejoin the Allied troop movement toward Paris. A short time later, while en route to the supply depot, Hargrove and Mulvehill get lost and wind up in Paris. Mulvehill insists that they look for the hidden watches, but no sooner do they start digging than they are caught by military police officers and are arrested for going AWOL. Mulvehill later wins their release by lying to the military chaplain and telling him that Hargrove left his post to see his fiancée. The plan backfires, however, when the chaplain finds Hargrove and Mulvehill consorting with Jeanne, who makes it known that she is not Hargrove's fiancée. Fed up with Mulvehill's tricks and lies, Hargrove returns to camp alone and asks to be reassigned away from him. Hargrove later has a change of heart, though, when Mulvehill fails to return to camp and is believed to be missing. After finding Mulvehill in Paris, Hargrove and Scramps return him to their unit in time to participate in a successful military offensive. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.